Recordings of silence.

Started by Mandryka, December 25, 2020, 05:31:30 AM

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Mandryka

Ligeti's early bagatelles for David Tudor seem to contain more silence than pitches - eveidently Cage influenced

https://www.youtube.com/v/6Dx2PIWZ0x4
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Mandryka

Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Mandryka

#22


https://www.squidco.com/miva/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=S&Product_Code=18829

Francisco Lopez's Paris Hiss has two tracks on my copy, with wonderful titles. Les paroles m'ont laissé indifférent, and Je ne voulait pas m'endormir avant de savoir comment l'histoire finirait.

Lopez writes in the sleeve

QuotePARIS HISS was born when I realised and connected three different facts. (1) For many years I'd been working with a treatment procedure that relies on successive generations of sound processing and recording; (2) I've done most of this work with analogue cassette tapes; (3) One of my main interests and source of aesthetical [sic] inspiration is the exploration of the broad brand universe. Three years ago I came up with the idea of using magnetic broad band noise of cassettes (tape hiss) for a sound work which would have blank tapes as the sole sound generators. I use a standard double tape deck and two standard normal position (normal bias - 120us EQ) cassette tapes dubbing one of them on to the other successively for hundreds of generations (real time and no NR) Tape hiss commonly considered as an obnoxious property of analogue tapes, is thus enhanced and appreciated here as a delightful virtue. I did a selection and further mix of the recordings for the two pieces of PARIS HISS , since this work expresses my anti-Lucier view: the point is not the process but the results. I did what I did not because I'm interested in the procedure (which is a question of recipes), but because I like tape hiss! (which is a question of taste.) PARIS HISS is a tribute to the cassette and all the people of the Experimental Network that have managed to use this technical tool in a creative way.

I wonder if he is being fair to Alvin Lucier there.

I must say I think it's absolutely wonderful both aesthetically, sensually,  and conceptually. But, as Francisco would say, that's a question of taste.
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

steve ridgway

Quote from: Mandryka on April 10, 2021, 05:25:03 AM
I must say I think it's absolutely wonderful both aesthetically, sensually,  and conceptually. But, as Francisco would say, that's a question of taste.

It's a great idea although with a hundred copies he must have spent a lot of time finding bits without any voices from the spirit world. ;)


Mandryka

#25
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ynKGCh9JDe0&ab_channel=FifthHouseEnsemble

In LaMont Young's Composition 1960 #6, performers play no music. Rather they act as the audience, attending to the other people in the hall.  Here's the score

Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Dry Brett Kavanaugh

Very important topics/concept, Mandryka. As you indicated several times, I think lutist Toyohiko Sato is "playing" silence and rests.
Plus I like Satie's Preludes de Fils des Etoiles, Vexations, etc. I think the notes are part of the silence in these works. I like the slow and cool performance by Cristina Ariagno, but I'm sure other players are fine too.

Mandryka

The score of Cage's Electronic Music for Piano asks for consideration of the imperfections in the silence where the music is performed (I'm enjoying Lexer and Tilbury now.)

Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Que

Quote from: Mandryka on June 28, 2022, 10:27:44 AM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ynKGCh9JDe0&ab_channel=FifthHouseEnsemble

In LaMont Young's Composition 1960 #6, performers play no music. Rather they act as the audience, attending to the other people in the hall.  Here's the score




It is art, performance art to be precise, but not music IMO.

Skogwald

This is a great topic. Many of my favorite composers and free improv people make heavy use of silence.

There's a composer collective Wandelweiser that focuses on this aspect. Make sure to get this album:


AnotherSpin

#30
Quote from: Mandryka on January 17, 2021, 01:33:49 PM


Bernhard Gunter's Whiteout is very quiet.  There is no pulse; no melody; no determinate pitch. It is so quiet you sometimes don't know whether what you hear is in the music or whether it's part of your environment. It erodes the barrier between music and life.

[flash=200,200]https://www.youtube.com/v/QZfMp6tredw&t=1167s&ab_channel=Dogevillage[/flash]

The recording is here, but mine is a different version and I'm not totally sure where Whiteout starts. Maybe at 9 minutes. But no matter, you'll get the idea.

A few years ago I collected some number of Bernhard Günter albums. The barely audible music was strangely interesting, and the fact that it could be listened to at almost any volume seemed appealing. There were also similar musicians in the electronic avant-garde milieu, names don't immediately come to mind now.

Recently mentioned in another thread Sachiko M uses silence extensively in some of her recordings.

Years ago I had a double LP edition of Keith Jarrett's Eyes of the Heart album. The sound was on three sides, the fourth side was a completely silent track, about 18 minutes long. The strange thing was that the track was cut, the vinyl was not "bald". Given that the ECM slogan was "the most beautiful sounds next to silence" it didn't seem coincidental.