Author Topic: Reicha's RomperRoom  (Read 17067 times)

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Offline SonicMan46

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Re: Reicha's RomperRoom
« Reply #60 on: January 07, 2021, 09:01:48 AM »
Well, has been over 3 years of dormancy here!  :(  8)

My Reicha collection consists mainly of his wind chamber music, including a 12-CD box of the Wind Quintets - BUT, appears that Toccata & Chandos have/are releasing sets of his solo piano music w/ pianists, Ivan Ilíc & Henrik Löwenmark - the current releases are shown below, included in a quoted post just left in the listening thread; attached are reviews of all discs shown, except No. 3 by Ilíc.

So, something new from Reicha - hope that some have heard both performers in these works and offer some comments - from the reviews I've read, appears to be a 'toss up'!  Dave :)

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Reicha, Antoine (1770-1836) - Piano Music w/ Henrik Löwenmark - from a Spotify playlist - 4 volumes; there is another 3 volume series now on Chandos w/ Ivan Ilić that was just mentioned in another thread; being a fan of Reicha's wind music, I was curious about his solo piano output - would be curious if anyone has heard both pianists in this repertoire?  If so, any comments?  Thanks - Dave :)



   

Offline SonicMan46

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Re: Reicha's RomperRoom
« Reply #61 on: January 07, 2021, 09:53:12 AM »
Well, I was curious about the number of potential 'solo piano' CDs these two pianists might finally produce - so, looked at Reicha's output for the piano (Wiki source below) - he wrote a LOT!  The works are divided into those w/ Opus numbers (top of list) & those without a number (bottom portion) - also in the bottom pic are the recorded works on the 4 discs w/ Löwenmark - easy to match the Opus numbered works (in bold in the list) but nearly all of the recordings on V.4 have no numbers.  BOTTOM LINE - there is plenty more that could be recorded!  Dave :)

Works for piano solo (Source)
* Différentes pièces, Op. 23 (c. 1796–8)
* Rondos and a Fantasia (c. 1796–8)
* Twelve Fugues (Paris, 1800–01)
* Etudes ou Exercices, Op. 30 (Paris, c. 1800-01) (includes exercises 2, 9, 23 and 24 from Practische Beispiele) - V3
* Etude de transitions and 2 fantasies, Op. 31 (Paris, 1802)
* Fugue on a theme by Domenico Scarlatti, Op. 32 (Paris, 1802)
* 36 Fugues (Vienna, 1803) (includes Op. 32 as Fugue No. 9, a Fantasia from Op. 31, Etude No. 9 from Op. 30, exercises 10 and 22 from Practische Beispiele and "12 Fugues" of 1799 (no opus number). The opus number 36 is sometimes assigned to this work.)
* Sonata in E major, Op. 40 (Leipzig, 1803)
* L'art de varier, Op. 57 (Leipzig, c. 1803–4)
* Sonata in E flat major, Op. 43 (Leipzig, 1804)
* Three Sonatas (G major, B-flat major, E major), Op. 46 (Leipzig, 1804) - V1
* Sonata in E-flat (c. 1804-5)
* Two Fantasies (C major, F major), Op. 59 (Leipzig, 1805) - V1
* Fantasy in C minor, exercise 13 from Practische Beispiele, Op. 61 (Leipzig, 1807)
* Six Fugues, Op. 81 (Paris, 1810) - V2
* Variations, Op. 83 (Paris, before 1815)
* Variations on Charmante Gabrielle, Op. 85 (Paris, before 1815)
- La victoire (Allegro brillant), Op. 86 (Paris, before 1815)
* Variations on a theme by Gluck, Op. 87 (Paris, before 1815)
* L’enharmonique, piece no. 16 from Op. 97 (c. 1815)
* Etudes dans le genre fugué, Op. 97 (La fugue et le contrepoint, 34 études de fugues et contrepoint) (c. 1815-17)
* Fugue analysée sous le rapport de l’harmonie, in Cours de composition musicale (before 1818)
* Etudes de piano ou 57 variations sur un theme, suivies, variations on a theme by Grétry and a rondeau, Op. 102 (Paris, c. 1820) - V2
* Allegretto in A major (1822)
* Harmonie retrograde (1825)
* Fugue à 3 dans le style moderne (before 1826)

In addition, a number of undated pieces are known, among which are untitled pieces, sonata movements and the following titled works:
* Air de ballet
* Allegretto
* Andante varié
* Andantino
* Capriccio
* Fantaisie sur l'harmonie précédente, 5 fantasias
* Fantaisie sur un seul accord ("Fantasy on a single chord")
* Fantasia on a theme by Frescobaldi - V3
* La chercheuse d'esprit, arr. of 13 Fr. 16th-century ariettas
* L'espiègle
* Marche funèbre
* Marche funèbre, from "Musique pour célébrer.." (see Miscellaneous works for orchestra)
* Prelude in E-flat major
* Three Rondos
* Sonate facile (La pastorale)
* Sonata in F major (Variations on a theme by Mozart)
* Six Sonatas
* Variations in E-flat major



Offline Brian

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Re: Reicha's RomperRoom
« Reply #62 on: January 09, 2021, 07:34:57 PM »
I have recently been enjoying a disc of Reicha's wind quintets with the Belfiato Quintet (Supraphon) and wondering why on earth I ignored his music for so long. It's delightful and endlessly creative in very small unflashy ways. Sort of like the windy heir to Haydn.

Hurwitz recently had huge praise for a Brilliant recording of the "quatuor scientifique" and mentioned Reicha's personal view that fugues could be composed on any subject, with the voices in any key. Now that sounds like something worth hearing.

Offline SonicMan46

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Re: Reicha's RomperRoom
« Reply #63 on: January 09, 2021, 08:46:38 PM »
I have recently been enjoying a disc of Reicha's wind quintets with the Belfiato Quintet (Supraphon) and wondering why on earth I ignored his music for so long. It's delightful and endlessly creative in very small unflashy ways. Sort of like the windy heir to Haydn.

Hurwitz recently had huge praise for a Brilliant recording of the "quatuor scientifique" and mentioned Reicha's personal view that fugues could be composed on any subject, with the voices in any key. Now that sounds like something worth hearing.

Thanks Brian for your post - the Wind Quintets are a delight - a half dozen years ago I settled on the set w/ the Westwood Wind Quintet, although others are available as shown below - I wrote to Crystal Records back then about the instruments used - quoted below is the response from Peter Christ, the oboist (date 2015) - believe the others are modern instruments, too.  Dave :)

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Hello David,

Always good to hear from a Reicha fan. We used modern instruments for all of the quintets. For our touch of historical authenticity, we did use the original Reicha manuscripts.

Good listening,

Peter Christ
Crystal Records Inc.

   

Brass Hole

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Re: Reicha's RomperRoom
« Reply #64 on: January 10, 2021, 01:35:54 AM »
I have recently been enjoying a disc of Reicha's wind quintets with the Belfiato Quintet (Supraphon) and wondering why on earth I ignored his music for so long. It's delightful and endlessly creative in very small unflashy ways. Sort of like the windy heir to Haydn.

Hurwitz recently had huge praise for a Brilliant recording of the "quatuor scientifique" and mentioned Reicha's personal view that fugues could be composed on any subject, with the voices in any key. Now that sounds like something worth hearing.

Did you know that a woodwind quintet didn't exist when Reich composed his first set? Anyone who shared living quarters with Beethoven is good in my book.
And this is an excerpt from his autobiography:
There was a dearth not only of good classic music, but of any good music for wind instruments, simply because the composers knew little of their technique. The effects that a combination of these instruments could produce had not been explored. Instrumentalists have made enormous strides in the past twenty years, their instruments have been perfected by the addition of keys, but there was no worthwhile music to show their possibilities. Such was the state of affairs when I conceived the idea of writing a quintet for a combination of the five principal wind instruments (flute, oboe, clarinet, horn and bassoon). My first attempt was a failure, and I discarded it. A new style of composition was necessary for these instruments, which are between the voices and strings. Combinations of a particular kind had to be devised in order to strike the listener. After much thought and careful study of the possibilities of each instrument, I made my second attempt, and wrote two very successful quintets. A few years later I had completed the six that make up the first book [Op. 88].

There, a few Reicha PI recordings:



Notes on his 36 fugues Op 36:
Bold writing for the period. Makes high demands on the pianist's interpretive powers. Kind of a later Well-Tempered Clavier. Some fugues are based on subjects by other composers, such as Bach, Mozart, Haydn, and Scarlatti.

PS. There needs to be a proper and informed discussion about the distinction between using period instruments and a historically informed practice somewhere sometime, especially for the past transition period. I have serious notes based on Bach Violin Sonatas.


« Last Edit: January 10, 2021, 01:43:32 AM by Brass Hole »