Author Topic: Your Favorite Villain/s in Literature  (Read 7115 times)

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Offline Florestan

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Re: Your Favorite Villain/s in Literature
« Reply #80 on: March 19, 2019, 07:30:37 AM »
How were Villefort's other family members responsible for what Gérard de Villefort did? The mass murders throughout history have been committed on the basis that "sins of the fathers shall be visited on the children". Make no mistake, this was not the only reason. Being a power-hungry monster either born or bred certainly was a major factor in this. But it still doesn't change the horrific things  the Jews, for example, were forced to go through the centuries because their ancestors allegedly crucified Christ or were responsible for it.

See? Exactly like I said before: you go into far fetched and absurd comparisons. The topic was Edmond Dantes and you brought in first Stalin and now the plight of the Jews through the centuries. What's next, the Ottoman genocide against Armenians?

Try a little exercise: put yourself into Edmond Dantes' shoes and ask yourself: what would I have done if I had been him? Are you that sure you'd not have done what he eventually did?
What is Music? How do you define it? Music is a calm moonlit night, the rustle of leaves in Summer. Music is the far off peal of bells at dusk! Music comes straight from the heart and talks only to the heart: it is Love!  --- Rachmaninoff

Offline Jaakko Keskinen

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Re: Your Favorite Villain/s in Literature
« Reply #81 on: March 19, 2019, 07:33:34 AM »
Try a little exercise: put yourself into Edmond Dantes' shoes and ask yourself: what would I have done if I had been him? Are you that sure you'd not have done what he eventually did?

I have. And I wouldn't consider it impossible. However, did it ever occur to you that I might consider myself (a potential) real-life villain?
"Javert, though frightful, had nothing ignoble about him. Probity, sincerity, candor, conviction, the sense of duty, are things which may become hideous when wrongly directed; but which, even when hideous, remain grand."

- Victor Hugo

Offline Florestan

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Re: Your Favorite Villain/s in Literature
« Reply #82 on: March 19, 2019, 09:36:51 AM »
I have. And I wouldn't consider it impossible. However, did it ever occur to you that I might consider myself (a potential) real-life villain?

Anyone, myself included, is a potential real-life villain.  :laugh:
What is Music? How do you define it? Music is a calm moonlit night, the rustle of leaves in Summer. Music is the far off peal of bells at dusk! Music comes straight from the heart and talks only to the heart: it is Love!  --- Rachmaninoff

Ken B

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Re: Your Favorite Villain/s in Literature
« Reply #83 on: March 19, 2019, 12:16:55 PM »
Anyone, myself included, is a potential real-life villain.  :laugh:

FTFY


 :P ;D

Offline Florestan

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Re: Your Favorite Villain/s in Literature
« Reply #84 on: March 19, 2019, 12:19:07 PM »
FTFY


 :P ;D

Go on, confess! Whom have you murdered in the last 24 hours?  :P ;D
What is Music? How do you define it? Music is a calm moonlit night, the rustle of leaves in Summer. Music is the far off peal of bells at dusk! Music comes straight from the heart and talks only to the heart: it is Love!  --- Rachmaninoff

Ken B

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Re: Your Favorite Villain/s in Literature
« Reply #85 on: March 19, 2019, 12:41:09 PM »
Go on, confess! Whom have you murdered in the last 24 hours?  :P ;D
Statute of limitations.

Offline BasilValentine

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Re: Your Favorite Villain/s in Literature
« Reply #86 on: March 19, 2019, 02:51:43 PM »
I second the Stavrogin mention. The most evil and best written character I've ever read.

Of the two villains in Devils, I think Peter Verkhovensky is far more vile than Stavrogin, who would never have stooped to Peter's conniving, desire to control, and pettiness. There is a touch of grandeur in Stavrogin's nihilism and sociopathy. He is the raw power worms like Peter have to harness to raise themselves from the mud.       

Offline Florestan

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Re: Your Favorite Villain/s in Literature
« Reply #87 on: December 24, 2020, 01:48:42 PM »
Since it's Christmas, I nominate Ebenezer Scrooge. Possibly and probably the most vilified character in literature, he's actually the least vile of all famous villains in literature. What Dickens did to him is nothing short of character assassination (pun).  :D
What is Music? How do you define it? Music is a calm moonlit night, the rustle of leaves in Summer. Music is the far off peal of bells at dusk! Music comes straight from the heart and talks only to the heart: it is Love!  --- Rachmaninoff

Offline (poco) Sforzando

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Re: Your Favorite Villain/s in Literature
« Reply #88 on: December 24, 2020, 02:17:30 PM »
Since it's Christmas, I nominate Ebenezer Scrooge. Possibly and probably the most vilified character in literature, he's actually the least vile of all famous villains in literature. What Dickens did to him is nothing short of character assassination (pun).  :D

Anybody who loathes Christmas is a hero in my book.
"I don't know what sforzando means, though it clearly means something."

Offline Florestan

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Re: Your Favorite Villain/s in Literature
« Reply #89 on: December 24, 2020, 02:34:39 PM »
Anybody who loathes Christmas is a hero in my book.

I remember that, Larry, I vividly do --- in fact, I checked my memory just a very few hours ago...  ;D

Nevertheless I am sure that if you witnessed in person (ie, listened to, and tasted) a traditional Romanian Christmas --- which has got nothing, but absolutely nothing at all to do with what passes for "Christmas" in the USA --- you'd perhaps soften your stance on it. Our traditional Christmas is all about good traditional music, good traditional food and good traditional drinks --- truly and really Gloria in excelsis Deo, et in terra pax hominibus bonae voluntatis.

What is Music? How do you define it? Music is a calm moonlit night, the rustle of leaves in Summer. Music is the far off peal of bells at dusk! Music comes straight from the heart and talks only to the heart: it is Love!  --- Rachmaninoff

Offline Pohjolas Daughter

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Re: Your Favorite Villain/s in Literature
« Reply #90 on: December 24, 2020, 02:39:21 PM »
I remember that, Larry, I vividly do --- in fact, I checked my memory just a very few hours ago...  ;D

Nevertheless I am sure that if you witnessed in person (ie, listened to, and tasted) a traditional Romanian Christmas --- which has got nothing, but absolutely nothing at all to do with what passes for "Christmas" in the USA --- you'd perhaps soften your stance on it. Our traditional Christmas is all about good traditional music, good traditional food and good traditional drinks --- truly and really Gloria in excelsis Deo, et in terra pax hominibus bonae voluntatis.
What is a traditional Romanian Christmas like?  I'd love to know and also what you and your family are doing too (including if a bit different).

Best wishes,

PD

Offline Florestan

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Re: Your Favorite Villain/s in Literature
« Reply #91 on: December 24, 2020, 03:08:55 PM »
What is a traditional Romanian Christmas like?  I'd love to know and also what you and your family are doing too (including if a bit different).

First and foremost a traditional Romanian Christmas is full of snow, but courtesy of climate change this hasn't been the case for several years. (In my childhood, ie 1975-1985, it was very much the case.)

Secondly, groups of singers (mostly children & teenagers, but also grown-ups) go from house to house singing carols. They absolutely must be rewarded with money, drinks or food. Most of these carols are very old --- albeit arranged by modern composers. Just today I've been listening to some of them while driving and I was blown away by the quality of music and performance --- but then again I'm surely biased. Nevertheless, jiudge for yourself: here are five of the most famous ones:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LuVYRZ8cmsA

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bCPz6vOwWek

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TccCXeiN-_o

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ag059GLun48

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ih2Qqh5OsM8

Thirdly, we eat sarmale (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sarma_(food)), cozonac (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cozonac) and drink țuică (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C8%9Auic%C4%83) and homemade wine (I belong to those not a few happy who are able to grow their own grapes and make their own wine).

Fourthly, I guess the children's joy and happiness when opening the Christmas presents is the same as everywhere else.

 :D






What is Music? How do you define it? Music is a calm moonlit night, the rustle of leaves in Summer. Music is the far off peal of bells at dusk! Music comes straight from the heart and talks only to the heart: it is Love!  --- Rachmaninoff

Offline Pohjolas Daughter

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Re: Your Favorite Villain/s in Literature
« Reply #92 on: December 24, 2020, 03:28:13 PM »
First and foremost a traditional Romanian Christmas is full of snow, but courtesy of climate change this hasn't been the case for several years. (In my childhood, ie 1975-1985, it was very much the case.)

Secondly, groups of singers (mostly children & teenagers, but also grown-ups) go from house to house singing carols. They absolutely must be rewarded with money, drinks or food. Most of these carols are very old --- albeit arranged by modern composers. Just today I've been listening to some of them while driving and I was blown away by the quality of music and performance --- but then again I'm surely biased. Nevertheless, jiudge for yourself: here are five of the most famous ones:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LuVYRZ8cmsA

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bCPz6vOwWek

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TccCXeiN-_o

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ag059GLun48

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ih2Qqh5OsM8

Thirdly, we eat sarmale (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sarma_(food)), cozonac (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cozonac) and drink țuică (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C8%9Auic%C4%83) and homemade wine (I belong to those not a few happy who are able to grow their own grapes and make their own wine).

Fourthly, I guess the children's joy and happiness when opening the Christmas presents is the same as everywhere else.

 :D
Thank you Floristan, I'll check into the videos soon.  :)

Best wishes,

PD

Offline DavidW

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Re: Your Favorite Villain/s in Literature
« Reply #93 on: January 19, 2021, 04:54:09 PM »
Vronsky in Anna K.  He is very relatable and human.

Offline Dry Brett Kavanaugh

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Re: Your Favorite Villain/s in Literature
« Reply #94 on: January 25, 2021, 07:39:50 AM »
Svidrigaïlov in Crime and Punishment. He is a wealthy former-employer, and pursuer, of Raskolinikov’s sister. I like his nihilistic and paradoxical character with an apparent occult ability.
« Last Edit: January 25, 2021, 07:56:53 AM by Dry Brett Kavanaugh »

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Your Favorite Villain/s in Literature
« Reply #95 on: January 26, 2021, 03:13:01 AM »
Mr Murdstone in Dickens's 'David Copperfield' with his tyrannical mathematics question about Double Gloucester cheese.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Your Favorite Villain/s in Literature
« Reply #96 on: January 26, 2021, 03:13:41 AM »
Svidrigaïlov in Crime and Punishment. He is a wealthy former-employer, and pursuer, of Raskolinikov’s sister. I like his nihilistic and paradoxical character with an apparent occult ability.
+1
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).