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Cool Britannia

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Mandryka:


I’m not sure if John Croft is British, I note he got his first degree in New Zealand, but he seems to work in the UK. What I find impressive is a seriousness, a sensuality and a feeling of the other worldly: pregnant silences, unexpected harmonies and timbres. The effects he uses are often not unfamiliar - Luigi Nono, Jonathan Harvey, maybe most of all Klaus Huber (because of the seriousness) all come to mind. But somehow the way he uses them is very impressive.


Mandryka:
Cassandra Miller is Australian, she works in London and so I'll put her here as an honorary Brit. I just want to make a note of links to papers I'm reading which discuss her music.

The composer's music Bel Canto
https://vimeo.com/444187045


James Weeks, Along The Grain
https://www.jstor.org/stable/43932618?read-now=1&refreqid=excelsior%3A2603605a641f2e6ddb96362d27b08121&seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents


Bernhard Lang's Cuts’n Beats
https://www.borealisfestival.no/2006/cutsandbeats.pdf

Martin Arnold's Piece Touchee
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AnDagpv4kUk&ab_channel=Jujyfruits

Mandryka:
Cassandra Miller is very active in London, where she works, and is one of those composers who has a sort of local cult. Most of her music is available on Another Timbre, but I just found an extraordinary piece for string orchestra, descending glissandi, relentlessly descending glissandi, on this interesting CD on bandcamp and spotify





She enjoys writing music which is based on found music, which he meticulously transcribes, her scores are micro-detailed and very technically demanding I'm told.

Probably my favourite pieces by her have been O Zomer and Philip The Wonderer (for Philip Thomas) -- here he is

https://www.youtube.com/v/FYiiilacMIs&ab_channel=continuummusic

Very often her work is based on found music. In the Tracery series a piece of found music is used initially as the basis of a meditation, where a singer spontaneously responds to what she hears -- she has a singer working with her, Juliet Fraser. These improvisations are recorded and then processed. Here's Tracery: Rocking and Swaying, which is based on a Ben Johnson quartet, introduced by Juliet

https://vimeo.com/267404968

In the introduction Juliet Fraser explains the evident connection to Pauline Oliveros's work. I note that, as far as I know, Oliveros's meditations were NOT performance pieces, and inded Fraser denies that what she's doing in Tracery is performing. I don't know what I think of this.

Mandryka:
Cassandra Miller’s doctorate.

http://eprints.hud.ac.uk/id/eprint/34998/1/FINAL%20THESIS%20-%20Miller.pdf

amw:


Have only listened to the big piece here but it's quite attractive music, in a vaguely post-new complexity-ish way. Pace sounds good to me here but I don't have very good speakers.

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