Author Topic: Cooking Hacks For Those That Love To Cook  (Read 2443 times)

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Online Pohjolas Daughter

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Re: Cooking Hacks For Those That Love To Cook
« Reply #20 on: February 09, 2021, 08:46:43 AM »
Interesting thread, which I'll certainly be checking in on, now and then.

As an aside, here's Cookwise, the great book by Shirley Corriher, who (if I recall) was the chef that Julia Child consulted when she had cooking questions. The book goes deep into the chemistry of cooking, and why certain ingredients react in the way they do. 



--Bruce
Oh, neat!  I'll have to keep an eye out for it.  I like checking out this website:  https://www.seriouseats.com/the-food-lab

He's also written a book (which a friend of mine really likes).  Alton Brown used to have a show on the Food Network which was fun to watch too.

PD

Offline DavidW

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Re: Cooking Hacks For Those That Love To Cook
« Reply #21 on: February 09, 2021, 09:37:03 AM »
Alton Brown used to have a show on the Food Network which was fun to watch too.

PD

He actually brought it back on YT.  I was shocked to see how much he aged!  I used to watch Good Eats all the time.

Online Mandryka

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Re: Cooking Hacks For Those That Love To Cook
« Reply #22 on: February 09, 2021, 09:48:35 AM »
Apologies for the delay in replying to you; trust that things still came out o.k.?

For me, I like to cut off the top and the bottom of the squash.  I then cut off the round bottom.  You can then either stand the bottom on end (since you now have a flat base) and then cut it in half lengthwise.  I then use a sturdy soup spoon to scoop/scrape the seeds and the stringy stuff out (i normally toss it but you could also, if you're patient, clean off and roast the seeds).  I then cut the narrow half down the middle and chunk it up---it depends what all I'm using it for.The freezing trick for a few minutes works for a number of things:  making a carpaccio, grating soft cheeses, etc.

Tip:  When wanting to cook almost any protein, make sure first that it's at or close to room temperature--avoids having a burnt exterior and a raw interior!

And please, oh please, do NOT wash your chicken, beef, etc. before cooking it.  It's not necessary and only spreads bacteria all around your sink and possibly your countertops.  Just pat it dry with paper towels.

PD

It's that stringy stuff which I hate. There must be a better way.
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Online Pohjolas Daughter

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Re: Cooking Hacks For Those That Love To Cook
« Reply #23 on: February 09, 2021, 09:56:02 AM »
It's that stringy stuff which I hate. There must be a better way.
You might try an ice-cream scooper?  I would not try it though with one of those types that you squeeze to get it to release the ice cream.

See No. 4 here:  https://www.huffpost.com/entry/butternut-squash-hacks_n_55f970d5e4b0d6492d63a733

PD

p.s.  I just peeled a yam...yard to get the skin off, but I did it!  :)

Offline DavidW

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Re: Cooking Hacks For Those That Love To Cook
« Reply #24 on: February 09, 2021, 11:03:51 AM »
And please, oh please, do NOT wash your chicken, beef, etc. before cooking it.  It's not necessary and only spreads bacteria all around your sink and possibly your countertops.  Just pat it dry with paper towels.

PD

Oh I didn't know this!

Online Pohjolas Daughter

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Re: Cooking Hacks For Those That Love To Cook
« Reply #25 on: February 09, 2021, 11:13:21 AM »
Oh I didn't know this!
Here's one article about it from Food & Wine (magazine).  https://www.foodandwine.com/news/raw-poultry-wash-usda-study

Online Mandryka

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Re: Cooking Hacks For Those That Love To Cook
« Reply #26 on: February 10, 2021, 12:57:10 PM »
You might try an ice-cream scooper?  I would not try it though with one of those types that you squeeze to get it to release the ice cream.

See No. 4 here:  https://www.huffpost.com/entry/butternut-squash-hacks_n_55f970d5e4b0d6492d63a733

PD

p.s.  I just peeled a yam...yard to get the skin off, but I did it!  :)

Very good! I shall try the scoop forthwith.
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Offline Brewski

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Re: Cooking Hacks For Those That Love To Cook
« Reply #27 on: February 10, 2021, 09:46:00 PM »
Oh, neat!  I'll have to keep an eye out for it.  I like checking out this website:  https://www.seriouseats.com/the-food-lab

He's also written a book (which a friend of mine really likes).  Alton Brown used to have a show on the Food Network which was fun to watch too.

PD

And thanks for that site, new to me. "Unraveling the mysteries of home cooking through science" gets my attention!  8)

--Bruce
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Twitter: @BruceHodgesNY

Handelian

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Re: Cooking Hacks For Those That Love To Cook
« Reply #28 on: February 10, 2021, 10:12:48 PM »
Discovered a recipe for the good old English cottage pie which makes very well and feeds about six. Absolutely delicious with gravy!

https://www.bbcgoodfood.com/recipes/cottage-pie

Offline OrchestralNut

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Re: Cooking Hacks For Those That Love To Cook
« Reply #29 on: February 11, 2021, 05:33:51 AM »
Discovered a recipe for the good old English cottage pie which makes very well and feeds about six. Absolutely delicious with gravy!

https://www.bbcgoodfood.com/recipes/cottage-pie

That looks tasty. Thanks for sharing!  :)

I might try this one. In Canada, we usually call this "shepherd's pie".

Offline OrchestralNut

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Re: Cooking Hacks For Those That Love To Cook
« Reply #30 on: February 11, 2021, 05:38:03 AM »
Another tip that will be obvious to many, but perhaps not everyone:

Rinse your beans (especially canned beans like navy, kidney and black beans) under cold water before cooking. It will greatly reduce the "gas" impact.  :)

Online Pohjolas Daughter

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Re: Cooking Hacks For Those That Love To Cook
« Reply #31 on: February 11, 2021, 06:10:16 AM »
And thanks for that site, new to me. "Unraveling the mysteries of home cooking through science" gets my attention!  8)

--Bruce
Bruce,

Do you recall a program that used to be on NPR called "Ask Dr. Science!"? ["Remember, he knows more than you do."].  For those not familiar with it, it was a spoof/comedy science program; alas, they eventually took if off of the air because they were afraid of possible lawsuits from people who took it seriously.

Discovered a recipe for the good old English cottage pie which makes very well and feeds about six. Absolutely delicious with gravy!

https://www.bbcgoodfood.com/recipes/cottage-pie

That sounds yummy!  :)

Online Pohjolas Daughter

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Re: Cooking Hacks For Those That Love To Cook
« Reply #32 on: February 11, 2021, 06:27:35 AM »
Another tip that will be obvious to many, but perhaps not everyone:

Rinse your beans (especially canned beans like navy, kidney and black beans) under cold water before cooking. It will greatly reduce the "gas" impact.  :)
I've been thinking that I should try saving that liquid.  It's called aquafaba and is often used in vegan cooking (to replace eggwhites); I'd still rinse the beans though.
PD

p.s.  I really need to get better at getting used to soaking beans overnight  and cooking them myself.  It can make such a difference in recipes!

Speaking of beans, I love this recipe.  Yes, it takes forever to make, but it is soooo good and makes quite a bit and makes for excellent leftovers.  All you have to do the following day(s) is to poach an egg and slice the bread.  I'm tempted to try making the sauce mixture in a slow cooker and used some tinned peeled tomatoes instead of the plum (particularly this time of the year as it's hard to get ahold of nice ripe tomatoes).  https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2013/oct/18/chickpea-recipes-gondi-yotam-ottolenghi  The recipe is "Slow-cooked tomatoes on toast with poached egg".

Offline Brewski

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Re: Cooking Hacks For Those That Love To Cook
« Reply #33 on: February 11, 2021, 10:43:59 AM »
Bruce,

Do you recall a program that used to be on NPR called "Ask Dr. Science!"? ["Remember, he knows more than you do."].  For those not familiar with it, it was a spoof/comedy science program; alas, they eventually took if off of the air because they were afraid of possible lawsuits from people who took it seriously.


As an occasional NPR denizen, the show sounds familiar, but I know I never saw it. But of course, as usual, just did a quick YouTube search and...voila!

Thanks, looks like lots of fun.

--Bruce
"Do you realize that we're meteorites; almost as soon as we're born, we have to disappear?"

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Twitter: @BruceHodgesNY

Offline Benji

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Re: Cooking Hacks For Those That Love To Cook
« Reply #34 on: February 11, 2021, 02:07:33 PM »
That looks tasty. Thanks for sharing!  :)

I might try this one. In Canada, we usually call this "shepherd's pie".

Shepherd's pie is almost identical but it's made with lamb though. In the UK at least. I think I prefer that ... But I've not had either in so long. I don't know what you'd call a fake meat version - food scientist's pie? 😖

Offline OrchestralNut

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Re: Cooking Hacks For Those That Love To Cook
« Reply #35 on: February 11, 2021, 02:54:52 PM »
Shepherd's pie is almost identical but it's made with lamb though. In the UK at least.

Ahh, I see. I think in Canada it's all called shepherd's pie, regardless of what type of meat is in it, if I'm not mistaken.

Online Mandryka

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Re: Cooking Hacks For Those That Love To Cook
« Reply #36 on: March 17, 2021, 08:50:49 AM »
You might try an ice-cream scooper?  I would not try it though with one of those types that you squeeze to get it to release the ice cream.

See No. 4 here:  https://www.huffpost.com/entry/butternut-squash-hacks_n_55f970d5e4b0d6492d63a733

PD

p.s.  I just peeled a yam...yard to get the skin off, but I did it!  :)

The scoop works like a dream. It's a pleasure to deseed a butternut squash.
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Online Pohjolas Daughter

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Re: Cooking Hacks For Those That Love To Cook
« Reply #37 on: March 17, 2021, 02:29:15 PM »
The scoop works like a dream. It's a pleasure to deseed a butternut squash.
Glad to hear that it works for you.   :)  Here, I use a large spoon (oblong soup spoon) with good results.

Best wishes,

PD

Offline Holden

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Re: Cooking Hacks For Those That Love To Cook
« Reply #38 on: June 21, 2021, 11:42:17 PM »
Time to resurrect this thread as I listen to Mahler 1/Walter.

OK, a new cooking hack that I tried that is so easy and produces great results. All you need to do to make it work is think in advance. If you are vegetarian or vegan then read no further.

This is all about getting tender, flavorful meat every time. The process is called dry brining and it works. Many of us will season a beef steak, pork chop, lamb cutlet or a roast with a sprinkling of salt just prior to cooking it. However, what if you did this 24 hours before cooking? The results might surprise you. I came across this method at the beginning of the year. The idea is that you sprinkle on the salt as per normal but then put the meat uncovered in the fridge for up to 24 hours. In those 24 hours the salt is drawn into the meat, effectively tenderising it by breaking down the muscle proteins. The meat doesn't taste salty at all.

When I read about this method and being the skeptic I am I decided to give it the ultimate test - I'd roast a turkey drumstick. We all know how dry and tough roast turkey can get, especially if you decide to roast it in the BBQ which I did. I was gobsmacked by the result. The drummie was moist, tender and had great flavour. I've since done this with small cuts of meat (think chops and steaks) and full roasts.

If you want to give it a go look up 'dry brining'. This is an excellent site.

https://www.seriouseats.com/how-to-dry-brine

I've got a lamb rump roast finishing off as I type this post.
Cheers

Holden

Online Pohjolas Daughter

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Re: Cooking Hacks For Those That Love To Cook
« Reply #39 on: June 30, 2021, 06:39:07 AM »
Time to resurrect this thread as I listen to Mahler 1/Walter.

OK, a new cooking hack that I tried that is so easy and produces great results. All you need to do to make it work is think in advance. If you are vegetarian or vegan then read no further.

This is all about getting tender, flavorful meat every time. The process is called dry brining and it works. Many of us will season a beef steak, pork chop, lamb cutlet or a roast with a sprinkling of salt just prior to cooking it. However, what if you did this 24 hours before cooking? The results might surprise you. I came across this method at the beginning of the year. The idea is that you sprinkle on the salt as per normal but then put the meat uncovered in the fridge for up to 24 hours. In those 24 hours the salt is drawn into the meat, effectively tenderising it by breaking down the muscle proteins. The meat doesn't taste salty at all.

When I read about this method and being the skeptic I am I decided to give it the ultimate test - I'd roast a turkey drumstick. We all know how dry and tough roast turkey can get, especially if you decide to roast it in the BBQ which I did. I was gobsmacked by the result. The drummie was moist, tender and had great flavour. I've since done this with small cuts of meat (think chops and steaks) and full roasts.

If you want to give it a go look up 'dry brining'. This is an excellent site.

https://www.seriouseats.com/how-to-dry-brine

I've got a lamb rump roast finishing off as I type this post.
I haven't tried this technique before but have heard of it.  I seldom cook big cuts of meat, but I see that it also works for smaller pieces of meat and fish too.  I like the idea of really crispy skin.   :)  Part of the issue for me would be in trying to find enough room on the bottom shelf of my fridge (normally fridge is pretty packed with veggies and other things).  Wish that I had a spare fridge--could really use it at times.  Do you ever get concerned about cross-contamination with the meat/fish/chicken not being covered up and with air circulation in the fridge?

And, yes, like you I love that serious eats website!  Been tempted to buy his book.

PD