Author Topic: Chopin Op 48/1  (Read 834 times)

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Offline Holden

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Chopin Op 48/1
« on: February 11, 2021, 04:13:53 PM »
Op 48/1 is, IMO the jewel in the crown of the Chopin Nocturnes. It ranks up there for me with the first Ballade (much harder to play) as one of the finest of Chopin's works. I've played the work myself and while it's easier than the Ballade it has it's tricky interpretative moments.

I've heard some great versions over the years. I like Rubinstein's for it's simplicity and I also rate Moravec. Pollini's account from the 1960 Chopin competition is really spine tingling as is Sokolov live from Palau - such an interesting, intense and emotionally riveting performance though this is what you expect when Sokolov is on song. Argerich live at the Concertegebouw also rates for me.

Any other recommendations?
« Last Edit: February 11, 2021, 04:16:02 PM by Holden »
Cheers

Holden

Offline Mandryka

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Re: Chopin Op 48/1
« Reply #1 on: February 12, 2021, 01:12:03 AM »
It needs someone who won’t let the surfaces obscure the counterpoint, especially in the extraordinary central section. This may be hard to do on a modern piano, because the timbre is so much more uniform than the instruments Chopin was writing for, so there’s a danger that the voices are coloured in the same way. A modern piano doesn’t suit the music very well.

If you listen to Khouri, notice now the snarling bass voice in the opening section is so menacing, like artillery fire and bombs. That’s what’s needed to make this coherent and interesting, and to do justice to the part writing.

If you want this thread to turn into a list of performances, that’s my top pick


« Last Edit: February 12, 2021, 01:21:02 AM by Mandryka »
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Offline hvbias

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Re: Chopin Op 48/1
« Reply #2 on: February 12, 2021, 03:25:36 PM »
Andrzej Wasowski and Moravec's Nonesuch recording would be my two favorites. Wasowski is slow, but it's captivating throughout, it never sounds like the piece is breaking down. Pascal Amoyel's is another I find exceptional.

It needs someone who won’t let the surfaces obscure the counterpoint, especially in the extraordinary central section. This may be hard to do on a modern piano, because the timbre is so much more uniform than the instruments Chopin was writing for, so there’s a danger that the voices are coloured in the same way. A modern piano doesn’t suit the music very well.

If you listen to Khouri, notice now the snarling bass voice in the opening section is so menacing, like artillery fire and bombs. That’s what’s needed to make this coherent and interesting, and to do justice to the part writing.

If you want this thread to turn into a list of performances, that’s my top pick



What do you think of Fou Ts'ong? I've had his set of Nocturnes in my heavy rotation recently. Op. 48/1 is quite odd; throw some surface noise on the recording and I'd think it's someone like Mauriz Rosenthal or Emil von Sauer.
« Last Edit: February 12, 2021, 03:48:24 PM by hvbias »

Offline Mandryka

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Re: Chopin Op 48/1
« Reply #3 on: February 13, 2021, 04:47:19 AM »

What do you think of Fou Ts'ong? I've had his set of Nocturnes in my heavy rotation recently. Op. 48/1 is quite odd; throw some surface noise on the recording and I'd think it's someone like Mauriz Rosenthal or Emil von Sauer.

Haven't heard that one.
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Offline Mandryka

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Re: Chopin Op 48/1
« Reply #4 on: February 13, 2021, 08:40:16 AM »
Ok I've heard it now, he swoons his way through it!

With these nocturnes there are tons of wacky modern piano ones. For example, have you heard Roger Woodward play op 48/1? It's not on youtube as far as I can see. Unfortunately Tipo's not on youtube either. She doesn't swoon. Anyway after all that nonsense I felt the need for a rubato controlled version, much better, and a proper Chopin piano too.



« Last Edit: February 13, 2021, 08:52:53 AM by Mandryka »
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Offline Mandryka

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Re: Chopin Op 48/1
« Reply #5 on: February 13, 2021, 09:03:49 AM »
There's a tremendous moment just before the end, I put a red arrow there



I think a test of a good performance is what they make of that moment.
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