Author Topic: Baroque and early music on piano excluding Bach  (Read 8429 times)

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Offline Mandryka

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Re: Baroque and early music on piano excluding Bach
« Reply #80 on: April 19, 2021, 06:48:05 AM »
I think it's perfect background music while reading or sipping a drink.  :)

I’m not sure but I don’t think it’s an acoustic piano. I wonder if it’s midi.
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Offline Florestan

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Re: Baroque and early music on piano excluding Bach
« Reply #81 on: April 19, 2021, 06:55:34 AM »
I’m not sure but I don’t think it’s an acoustic piano. I wonder if it’s midi.

You mean Fontana? No way midi. I already got a volume and it definitely sounds like a genuine piano. A nice piano sound, even.

Info: https://www.girolamofrescobaldi.eu/en/minimal-english-2/
"Melody is the essence of music."  --- Mozart

Offline Mandryka

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Re: Baroque and early music on piano excluding Bach
« Reply #82 on: April 19, 2021, 07:04:53 AM »
You mean Fontana? No way midi. I already got a volume and it definitely sounds like a genuine piano. A nice piano sound, even.

Info: https://www.girolamofrescobaldi.eu/en/minimal-english-2/

Thanks for that, I see he’s recorded Fiori Musicali on the Mantua Antgenati, I shall listen tonight.

(The piano reminded me of the sound of Claudio Columbo. He too has recorded Frescobaldi on a piano.)
« Last Edit: April 19, 2021, 07:09:44 AM by Mandryka »
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Offline milk

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Re: Baroque and early music on piano excluding Bach
« Reply #83 on: April 20, 2021, 04:06:44 AM »
Hah!

https://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,2376.msg1094880.html#msg1094880
Ah it was you guys both who put it that way. Yes. I've got to put this on. I've gotta admit I'm not getting any mysticism from Fontana. But let's see I guess. ETA: Listening to Fontana and Schlime, they both have something to say here. Schlime does seem a bit freer but he also doesn't seem to be playing the entire scores? Is he shortening things? Or not playing some sort of repeats? I can't tell because this music is so abstract and weird. All the tracks on the Schlime are like two minutes. But Schlime is captivating.   
« Last Edit: April 20, 2021, 04:25:11 AM by milk »

Offline milk

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Re: Baroque and early music on piano excluding Bach
« Reply #84 on: April 20, 2021, 04:10:47 AM »
Thanks for that, I see he’s recorded Fiori Musicali on the Mantua Antgenati, I shall listen tonight.

(The piano reminded me of the sound of Claudio Columbo. He too has recorded Frescobaldi on a piano.)
I don't think Claudio Columbo is a real person. There's someone who's used some sort of technology to pump out (in midi) nearly every composer you can possibly think of and flood outlets with these. That's the name on it. Who knows if it's one person. To me, it's a bit of a scam.

Offline amw

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Re: Baroque and early music on piano excluding Bach
« Reply #85 on: April 20, 2021, 04:09:34 PM »
I can’t say I’m a huge fan of Fontana so far. He doesn’t play things completely straight and modernist like Pienaar in Gibbons (who I do like even though he’s just typing—he has energy and style, even if it is the style of the Stravinsky Serenade in A) or Brubaker in the Codex Faenza (who I like even more for the same reasons) and he doesn’t go into a haze of pianistic colour and softness like Kolesnikov in Couperin (who I also like, even though it’s arguably just salon music that way; that’s very much true to the context in which Couperin worked). Fontana feels sightread even though it isn’t; it’s hard to tell if he has a sense of longterm phrasing and everything seems very middle of the road. But I do like the meantone tuning on the piano so I’ll listen to all of the volumes in more detail and report if anything else stands out.

Offline milk

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Re: Baroque and early music on piano excluding Bach
« Reply #86 on: April 20, 2021, 10:04:11 PM »
I can’t say I’m a huge fan of Fontana so far. He doesn’t play things completely straight and modernist like Pienaar in Gibbons (who I do like even though he’s just typing—he has energy and style, even if it is the style of the Stravinsky Serenade in A) or Brubaker in the Codex Faenza (who I like even more for the same reasons) and he doesn’t go into a haze of pianistic colour and softness like Kolesnikov in Couperin (who I also like, even though it’s arguably just salon music that way; that’s very much true to the context in which Couperin worked). Fontana feels sightread even though it isn’t; it’s hard to tell if he has a sense of longterm phrasing and everything seems very middle of the road. But I do like the meantone tuning on the piano so I’ll listen to all of the volumes in more detail and report if anything else stands out.
That Tristano Frescobaldi recording is of a different sort. I think there's more command in the playing there while also seeming chancy and improvised. It seems more "rounded." 

Offline Mandryka

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Re: Baroque and early music on piano excluding Bach
« Reply #87 on: April 20, 2021, 10:47:20 PM »
I listened to the cento partite by Fontana.  The piano doesn’t have a strong bass response,  in fact some harpsichords are like this too, and Rousset has argued that this is the best way in the music. I found my ear constantly drawn to the top line. The interpretation, in the first part at least, is a bit linear. Claudio Colombo has also recorded it on piano.
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Offline milk

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Re: Baroque and early music on piano excluding Bach
« Reply #88 on: April 20, 2021, 11:44:58 PM »
I listened to the cento partite by Fontana.  The piano doesn’t have a strong bass response,  in fact some harpsichords are like this too, and Rousset has argued that this is the best way in the music. I found my ear constantly drawn to the top line. The interpretation, in the first part at least, is a bit linear. Claudio Colombo has also recorded it on piano.
Francesco Tristano is really talented IMO.
I was looking up Colombo and I think we had this discussion before, maybe many years ago.
I also found this old thread discussing him. It's interesting:

http://www.pianosociety.com/threads/claudio-colombo.1990/

Offline Mandryka

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Re: Baroque and early music on piano excluding Bach
« Reply #89 on: June 07, 2021, 04:26:14 AM »
<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/YPyNWSolkFY" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/YPyNWSolkFY</a>


Michael Hersch plays Josquin des Prez
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