The Music Room > General Classical Music Discussion

Famous people's preferred classical music

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Brian:
The idea for this thread - the classical listening habits of non-musical great artists, leaders, etc - came to me this afternoon while I visited the house of Mexican architect Luis Barragán. Barragán pioneered a modernist yet emotional style where natural light, filtered through colored windows, played a major role, and where simple lines concealed an almost OCD attention to detail. I'll post some photos of his work at the bottom of this post.

But in his house, he kept four record players. One in his bedroom, one in the guest room, one in the living room, and one in his private den, which was just above the living room but cleverly concealed behind a partial wall. (You could throw a paper airplane or, as he did, eavesdrop on his guests.  ;D )

Records on his shelf in the den included:
Vivaldi Four Seasons
Vivaldi mixed concertos
Shostakovich 10 - Mitropoulos
Grieg concerto - Rubinstein
Rachmaninov rhapsody + 2 - Yakov Zak
African folk drumming (multiple)
Grofé Grand Canyon Suite (!!!! Hello Cato)

Records on his shelf in his bedroom included:
Bartók concerto & duos - Menuhin (concerto not numbered)
Scarlatti - Kirkpatrick harpsichord box set
Mahler 8 - Solti
Penderecki - complete operas composed in Barragán's lifetime (up to the late 80s)

So if you listen to Mahler 8 and Penderecki in bed, you might just be a great architect!!  :o





Pohjolas Daughter:

--- Quote from: Brian on August 04, 2021, 01:05:39 PM ---The idea for this thread - the classical listening habits of non-musical great artists, leaders, etc - came to me this afternoon while I visited the house of Mexican architect Luis Barragán. Barragán pioneered a modernist yet emotional style where natural light, filtered through colored windows, played a major role, and where simple lines concealed an almost OCD attention to detail. I'll post some photos of his work at the bottom of this post.

But in his house, he kept four record players. One in his bedroom, one in the guest room, one in the living room, and one in his private den, which was just above the living room but cleverly concealed behind a partial wall. (You could throw a paper airplane or, as he did, eavesdrop on his guests.  ;D )

Records on his shelf in the den included:
Vivaldi Four Seasons
Vivaldi mixed concertos
Shostakovich 10 - Mitropoulos
Grieg concerto - Rubinstein
Rachmaninov rhapsody + 2 - Yakov Zak
African folk drumming (multiple)
Grofé Grand Canyon Suite (!!!! Hello Cato)

Records on his shelf in his bedroom included:
Bartók concerto & duos - Menuhin (concerto not numbered)
Scarlatti - Kirkpatrick harpsichord box set
Mahler 8 - Solti
Penderecki - complete operas composed in Barragán's lifetime (up to the late 80s)

So if you listen to Mahler 8 and Penderecki in bed, you might just be a great architect!!  :o







--- End quote ---
Very cool house!  I looked at some more images of it online too.   8)  Question:  what is that area/room with the blue and white and what looks to be a red wall?

You do realize, that he could (and probably did) move records around his house and listen to them in any room that he chose?  :)  In any event, not surprising that he liked listening to a fair bit of modern music considering his style....but also nice to see that he mixed it up with some older and some early works too.  Did he keep a diary?  If so, did he mention music in it?  You could also check to see what friends/family/folks who knew him wrote.

Interesting idea for a thread Brian.  Looking forward to seeing what kind of responses you get here.

PD

Archaic Torso of Apollo:
Interesting topic. There was a well-known novelist (unfortunately I don't remember who it was, I read this in a newspaper interview) who said he liked to write to the music of Bartok and Janacek. Something about the peculiar rhythms of that music having an effect on his prose.


--- Quote from: Brian on August 04, 2021, 01:05:39 PM ---
But in his house, he kept four record players.

--- End quote ---

So he's a vinylist?

T. D.:
Slightly OT, but there are well-known photos of Steve McQueen's living room with a number of albums scattered on the floor. Many posts on jazz forums had fun trying to identify the albums.

It'd be interesting to find some photos of celebrities' homes that include classical record collections.
For instance, here's a pic of some of Jimi Hendrix's collection including Holst's The Planets and Handel's Messiah:



More at https://handelhendrix.org/learn/about-hendrix/jimi-hendrixs-record-collection/ , though there's not much classical.

Pohjolas Daughter:

--- Quote from: Archaic Torso of Apollo on August 05, 2021, 05:43:47 AM ---Interesting topic. There was a well-known novelist (unfortunately I don't remember who it was, I read this in a newspaper interview) who said he liked to write to the music of Bartok and Janacek. Something about the peculiar rhythms of that music having an effect on his prose.

So he's a vinylist?

--- End quote ---
Apparently he died in 1988, so he might not have yet acquired one?  I did also read that a friend of his inherited his personal effects--perhaps that might also have included his 'newish' CD player (if he had one then) and CDs?


--- Quote from: T. D. on August 05, 2021, 05:52:11 AM ---Slightly OT, but there are well-known photos of Steve McQueen's living room with a number of albums scattered on the floor. Many posts on jazz forums had fun trying to identify the albums.

It'd be interesting to find some photos of celebrities' homes that include classical record collections.
For instance, here's a pic of some of Jimi Hendrix's collection including Holst's The Planets and Handel's Messiah:



More at https://handelhendrix.org/learn/about-hendrix/jimi-hendrixs-record-collection/ , though there's not much classical.

--- End quote ---
Neat!  I'll check out that link a bit later.

PD

p.s.  I remember years ago reading an article in Gramophone Magazine (forget what the name of that column was) but it was about how he, Robert Redford became interested in music--jazz in particular due to a rather Auntie Mame-sounding kind of aunt.

Does anyone here remember the name of that column?  It was always located in the back of the magazine (perhaps last page) and well-known people wrote about how they were introduced to classical music, jazz, etc.  He wrote it between, I'm guessing here, about 10-20 years ago.  If anyone here has a subscription to Gramophone, you could probably look it up.  Ah!  I just looked through a bunch of old G's that I had which were going into the paper recycling bin:  the column was called "My Music".

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