Author Topic: Your 10 favorite joyful works  (Read 3105 times)

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Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: Your 10 favorite joyful works
« Reply #20 on: August 26, 2021, 08:36:56 AM »
I suppose I earn the designation of post to elicit the least interest in the thread.
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Offline Brian

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Re: Your 10 favorite joyful works
« Reply #21 on: August 26, 2021, 10:27:40 AM »
I suppose I earn the designation of post to elicit the least interest in the thread.
Well, when I saw it last night, I thought "shoot, I ought to plan a whole day of listening around this post."

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: Your 10 favorite joyful works
« Reply #22 on: August 26, 2021, 11:28:36 AM »
Well, when I saw it last night, I thought "shoot, I ought to plan a whole day of listening around this post."

Hah! :)
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
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[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
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Re: Your 10 favorite joyful works
« Reply #23 on: August 26, 2021, 01:49:16 PM »
I suppose I earn the designation of post to elicit the least interest in the thread.

Well you didn't have any Pettersson on your list, and you know that he is the most joyful composer that ever lived.  His music is like painting rainbows and unicorns.

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: Your 10 favorite joyful works
« Reply #24 on: August 26, 2021, 02:27:23 PM »
Well you didn't have any Pettersson on your list, and you know that he is the most joyful composer that ever lived.  His music is like painting rainbows and unicorns.

Balloons! You forgot the balloons!
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
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[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
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His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Offline Symphonic Addict

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Re: Your 10 favorite joyful works
« Reply #25 on: August 28, 2021, 06:43:22 PM »
Nielsen: Symphony No. 3

How could anyone forget this beauty?
Give us something else; give us something new; for Heaven's sake give us something bad, so long as we feel we are alive and active and not just passive admirers of tradition!

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Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Your 10 favorite joyful works
« Reply #26 on: August 28, 2021, 07:34:52 PM »
Nielsen: Symphony No. 3

How could anyone forget this beauty?

I couldn’t! An amazing work. The third movement, Allegretto un poco, always reminded me of Janáček. Also, if that finale doesn’t put a smile on your face, I don’t know what will!
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Offline Symphonic Addict

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Re: Your 10 favorite joyful works
« Reply #27 on: August 28, 2021, 08:37:38 PM »
I couldn’t! An amazing work. The third movement, Allegretto un poco, always reminded me of Janáček. Also, if that finale doesn’t put a smile on your face, I don’t know what will!

I see your point about the Janacek connection. Nobody can resist its charms.
Give us something else; give us something new; for Heaven's sake give us something bad, so long as we feel we are alive and active and not just passive admirers of tradition!

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Offline vandermolen

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Re: Your 10 favorite joyful works
« Reply #28 on: September 01, 2021, 08:40:31 PM »
Ravel: 'Mother Goose Suite' which I just heard on the radio. I should have included it in my original list.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

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Offline Roasted Swan

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Re: Your 10 favorite joyful works
« Reply #29 on: September 09, 2021, 05:51:19 AM »
I suppose I earn the designation of post to elicit the least interest in the thread.

GREAT CHOICES ALL!!!  I often praise the old Readers Digest box sets - some great programming angenuinely fine performances.  They did a whole series of 3-disc "Mood" boxes - Calm/Mystery/Tranquil/Dreams etc.  One was "Jubilation" and it includes some crackers


Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: Your 10 favorite joyful works
« Reply #30 on: September 09, 2021, 06:03:01 AM »
GREAT CHOICES ALL!!!  I often praise the old Readers Digest box sets - some great programming angenuinely fine performances.  They did a whole series of 3-disc "Mood" boxes - Calm/Mystery/Tranquil/Dreams etc.  One was "Jubilation" and it includes some crackers



Thanks!
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Offline Symphonic Addict

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Re: Your 10 favorite joyful works
« Reply #31 on: September 09, 2021, 03:27:25 PM »
Being quite sincere and honest, I don't think any composer could beat Dvorak as the king of joyful and tuneful composers. That combination is not to be found in the musical history that often. Maybe on par with Haydn, I'd say. His life wasn't that tragic (Dvorak), and that does resemble the music. It's a mix of them, along with truly sense of rusticism, depth and Slavonic longing, mastery and ease to create perfect melodies that make the ear fall in love with it.
Give us something else; give us something new; for Heaven's sake give us something bad, so long as we feel we are alive and active and not just passive admirers of tradition!

Carl Nielsen

Offline ritter

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Re: Your 10 favorite joyful works
« Reply #32 on: September 10, 2021, 12:03:21 AM »
One of the greatest examples ever of a joyful work (in my book): Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg:)
ritter
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« Je me suis rarement perdu de vue ; je me suis détesté, je me suis adoré ; puis, nous avons vieilli ensemble. »

Offline Florestan

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Re: Your 10 favorite joyful works
« Reply #33 on: September 11, 2021, 10:43:08 AM »
Being quite sincere and honest, I don't think any composer could beat Dvorak as the king of joyful and tuneful composers. That combination is not to be found in the musical history that often. Maybe on par with Haydn, I'd say.

Here's my quite sincere and honest reply.

If you mean composers whose music is mostly cheerful, joyful, sunny, life-affirming and tuneful (with numerous but occasional, temporary, brief outbursts of melancholy, anger or despair), the list is very long. Otomh and in no particular order, Vivaldi, Cimarosa, D. Scarlatti, Boccherini, Mozart, Myslivecek, Krommer, Dittersdorf, Kozeluch, Pleyel, Rossini, Paganini, Hummel, Weber, Schubert, Mendelssohn, Glinka, Tchaikovsky, Wieniawski, Vieuxtemps, Henri Herz, Sigismond Thalberg, Liszt in his virtuoso-pre-Weimar-years, Saint-Saens, Lalo, Gouvy, the Lachner bros, Onslow, Raff, Julius Roentgen, Glazunov, Grieg, Svendsen, Halvorsen, Bortkiewicz, Milhaud, Jean Francaix, Poulenc, Gershwin, Granados, Turina, Rodrigo, Albeniz, Scott Joplin, Ernesto Nazareth, Pablo de Sarasate etc etc etc --- I'm sure the list could be expanded forever and ever, with a particular nod to Classicism, imho THE most cheerful, joyful, sunny, life-affirming and tuneful era in the whole history of "classical" music.

If you mean composers who never ever in their whole life wrote a single sad, dark, bleak and depressing work, I'm sorry to say that Haydn and Dvorak are not among them --- exhibit A: Stabat Mater (both), Requiem (Dvorak), The Seven Last Words of Christ (Haydn). Yet, there are many composers who never ever in their whole life wrote a single sad, dark, bleak and depressing work; otomh and in no particular order: the Strauss family, Joseph Lanner, Jacques Offenbach, Juventino Rosas, Emile Waldteufel, Franz Lehar, Imre Kalman, Gilbert & Sullivan etc etc etc.

Now, why here on GMG composers of exclusively cheerful, joyful, sunny, life-affirming and tuneful music are generally held in much less esteem, and are much less commented upon, than composers of exclusively sad, dark, bleak and depressing music is another, albeit related, discussion.

"Melody is the essence of music." - Mozart

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Offline Symphonic Addict

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Re: Your 10 favorite joyful works
« Reply #34 on: September 11, 2021, 05:33:01 PM »
Here's my quite sincere and honest reply.

If you mean composers whose music is mostly cheerful, joyful, sunny, life-affirming and tuneful (with numerous but occasional, temporary, brief outbursts of melancholy, anger or despair), the list is very long. Otomh and in no particular order, Vivaldi, Cimarosa, D. Scarlatti, Boccherini, Mozart, Myslivecek, Krommer, Dittersdorf, Kozeluch, Pleyel, Rossini, Paganini, Hummel, Weber, Schubert, Mendelssohn, Glinka, Tchaikovsky, Wieniawski, Vieuxtemps, Henri Herz, Sigismond Thalberg, Liszt in his virtuoso-pre-Weimar-years, Saint-Saens, Lalo, Gouvy, the Lachner bros, Onslow, Raff, Julius Roentgen, Glazunov, Grieg, Svendsen, Halvorsen, Bortkiewicz, Milhaud, Jean Francaix, Poulenc, Gershwin, Granados, Turina, Rodrigo, Albeniz, Scott Joplin, Ernesto Nazareth, Pablo de Sarasate etc etc etc --- I'm sure the list could be expanded forever and ever, with a particular nod to Classicism, imho THE most cheerful, joyful, sunny, life-affirming and tuneful era in the whole history of "classical" music.

If you mean composers who never ever in their whole life wrote a single sad, dark, bleak and depressing work, I'm sorry to say that Haydn and Dvorak are not among them --- exhibit A: Stabat Mater (both), Requiem (Dvorak), The Seven Last Words of Christ (Haydn). Yet, there are many composers who never ever in their whole life wrote a single sad, dark, bleak and depressing work; otomh and in no particular order: the Strauss family, Joseph Lanner, Jacques Offenbach, Juventino Rosas, Emile Waldteufel, Franz Lehar, Imre Kalman, Gilbert & Sullivan etc etc etc.

Now, why here on GMG composers of exclusively cheerful, joyful, sunny, life-affirming and tuneful music are generally held in much less esteem, and are much less commented upon, than composers of exclusively sad, dark, bleak and depressing music is another, albeit related, discussion.

Oh, yes. I get your points. It's impossible to avoid any composer could not feel sadness, melancholy, more poignant lyricism in their lives. That makes us human entities.

BTW, some important and kind of "obvious" candidates I forgot about. Silly me!
Give us something else; give us something new; for Heaven's sake give us something bad, so long as we feel we are alive and active and not just passive admirers of tradition!

Carl Nielsen

Offline kyjo

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Re: Your 10 favorite joyful works
« Reply #35 on: September 11, 2021, 06:37:22 PM »
Alfvén: Symphony no. 3
Anderson, Leroy: Piano Concerto in C major
Braga Santos: Symphony no. 4
Brahms: Serenade no. 1
Dubois: Quintette for oboe, violin, viola, cello, and piano
Dvořák: Symphony no. 8
Martinů: Symphony no. 1
Mozart: Piano Concerto no. 17
Poulenc: Cello Sonata
Saint-Saëns: Piano Concerto no. 1

List #2, because one can never have too much joy in their life! :D

Alnaes: Piano Concerto
Arensky: the 5 Suites for two pianos
Falla: El sombrero de tres picos (particularly for the Danza final)
Glazunov: Symphony no. 5
Kalinnikov: Symphony no. 2
Lloyd: Symphony no. 6
Mendelssohn: Cello Sonata no. 2
Peterson-Berger: Törnrosasagan (The Story of the Sleeping Beauty)
Respighi: Ancient Airs and Dances
Suk: Symphony no. 1 in E major
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Offline relm1

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Re: Your 10 favorite joyful works
« Reply #36 on: September 12, 2021, 05:17:03 AM »
How can I not say Holst' Jupiter: Bringer of Jolity?
Torke's Bright Blue Music https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OF4QBX0Ku88
Bernstein's Candide Overture
Handel: Royal Fireworks
Copeland's Rodeo (especially Hoe Down)
Rossini tends to be joyful to me
Lots of stuff from Mozart