Quiz: Mystery scores

Started by Sean, August 27, 2007, 06:49:47 AM

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Luke

Actually, to me no 5 looks a lot like a very famous piece, and the composer of that piece, although not this composer's father, was closely connected to him.

Florestan

Quote from: Luke on June 13, 2023, 02:34:17 AMActually, to me no 5 looks a lot like a very famous piece, and the composer of that piece, although not this composer's father, was closely connected to him.

Hmmmm... Soulima Stravinsky and something like Rimsky-Korsakov's Flight of the Bumblebee?
I love Italian opera – it's so reckless. Damn Wagner, and his bellowings at Fate and Death. Damn Debussy, and his averted face. I like the Italians who run all on impulse, and don't care about their immortal souls, and don't worry about the ultimate — D. H. Lawrence

classicalgeek

No. 3 is by Johann Christian Bach... "The London Bach". Makes some sense that he did arrangements of Scottish folk songs.
So much great music, so little time...

Original compositions and orchestrations: https://www.youtube.com/@jmbrannigan

Luke

Quote from: classicalgeek on June 13, 2023, 04:56:55 AMNo. 3 is by Johann Christian Bach... "The London Bach". Makes some sense that he did arrangements of Scottish folk songs.

Is correct. And Florestan's guess for no 5, whilst not correct, is so pertinent that it reminds me why I love this thread so much.

Karl Henning

Quote from: Luke on June 13, 2023, 06:30:32 AMIs correct. And Florestan's guess for no 5, whilst not correct, is so pertinent that it reminds me why I love this thread so much.
One of Soulima Stravinsky's Etudes Pittoresques?
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

VonStupp

Since you've posted it, #5 reminds me terribly of Mussorgsky's Pictures 'Promenade' (it would have to be the d minor one). It doesn't seem to fit the theme though and I have never looked at the piano score.
VS
"All the good music has already been written by people with wigs and stuff."

Luke

Quote from: VonStupp on June 13, 2023, 07:15:32 AMSince you've posted it, #5 reminds me terribly of Mussorgsky's Pictures 'Promenade' (it would have to be the d minor one). It doesn't seem to fit the theme though and I have never looked at the piano score.
VS

Yes, that's the resemblance I meant. It looks so similar (but it isn't). So the resemblance is to Mussorgsky, not Rimsky, and the piece isn't by Soulima Stravinsky.

Karl Henning

Quote from: Luke on June 13, 2023, 07:17:49 AMYes, that's the resemblance I meant. It looks so similar (but it isn't). So the resemblance is to Mussorgsky, not Rimsky, and the piece isn't by Soulima Stravinsky.
Pity. The similarity I fancied I perceived was to the opening of the Symphony of Psalms.
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Florestan

Quote from: Luke on June 13, 2023, 06:30:32 AMIs correct. And Florestan's guess for no 5, whilst not correct, is so pertinent that it reminds me why I love this thread so much.

Andrey Rimsky-Korsakov? Various internet sources claim he was a musicologist and acoustical engineer. Did he also compose? I couldn't find anything in this respect.  ???
I love Italian opera – it's so reckless. Damn Wagner, and his bellowings at Fate and Death. Damn Debussy, and his averted face. I like the Italians who run all on impulse, and don't care about their immortal souls, and don't worry about the ultimate — D. H. Lawrence

Luke

Close enough. The other brother, Georgy. Dad's link with Mussorgsky is obvious, including making this edition of the Pictures. Compare with his son's piece:


BWV 1080

On these:

1


2


3: El Enterriano


here are images from the first edition covers of 1 and 2 (not saying which is which)



not sure how I can make these more obvious...

Florestan

Quote from: Luke on June 13, 2023, 08:27:38 AMClose enough. The other brother, Georgy. Dad's link with Mussorgsky is obvious, including making this edition of the Pictures. Compare with his son's piece:

But, Luke, you are mistaken. Georgy was not Nikolai's son but his grandson, not Andrey's brother but his nephew. You sent me/us on a wild goose chase.  ;D

https://www.encyclopedia.com/arts/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/rimsky-korsakov-georgi-mikhailovich
I love Italian opera – it's so reckless. Damn Wagner, and his bellowings at Fate and Death. Damn Debussy, and his averted face. I like the Italians who run all on impulse, and don't care about their immortal souls, and don't worry about the ultimate — D. H. Lawrence

Luke

Hmmmm, how to save face....?

OK, how about: I don't know how you speak English in your country, but over here 'sons' means any direct male descendant, I thought that was obvious....


does that work? No?


What about: yes, Georgy, the son of the much better known Andrey, whose tunes I'm certainly whistling day and night.

Actually - mea culpa! I'm not sure why I thought he was a son, I must have read it, or thought I'd read it somewhere. Funnily enough, I wrote (a bit) about him, in connection to experiments he made in microtonality, in a book I was writing a couple of years ago. So I must have known the truth then, and subsequently it morphed into this horrific aberration by which I am suitably appalled. I retreat into my hole of shame.

Luke

Quote from: BWV 1080 on June 13, 2023, 08:32:35 AMOn these:

1


2


3: El Enterriano


here are images from the first edition covers of 1 and 2 (not saying which is which)



not sure how I can make these more obvious...

Making me feel even more foolish!  :'(  :'(  :'(

Florestan

Quote from: Luke on June 13, 2023, 09:23:27 AMHmmmm, how to save face....?

OK, how about: I don't know how you speak English in your country, but over here 'sons' means any direct male descendant, I thought that was obvious....


does that work? No?


What about: yes, Georgy, the son of the much better known Andrey, whose tunes I'm certainly whistling day and night.

Actually - mea culpa! I'm not sure why I thought he was a son, I must have read it, or thought I'd read it somewhere. Funnily enough, I wrote (a bit) about him, in connection to experiments he made in microtonality, in a book I was writing a couple of years ago. So I must have known the truth then, and subsequently it morphed into this horrific aberration by which I am suitably appalled. I retreat into my hole of shame.

No worries, Luke, can happen to anyone. At least I learned something: that Nikolai had a son and this son in turn had a composer nephew.  :D

I love Italian opera – it's so reckless. Damn Wagner, and his bellowings at Fate and Death. Damn Debussy, and his averted face. I like the Italians who run all on impulse, and don't care about their immortal souls, and don't worry about the ultimate — D. H. Lawrence

Luke


BWV 1080

Quote from: Luke on June 13, 2023, 09:26:40 AMMaking me feel even more foolish!  :'(  :'(  :'(


Also what looks like a tango in #2 is a habanera rhythm which came from the non-hispanic composer's visit to Cuba, and is somewhat unusual for its genre. 

BWV 1080

and if I am feeling tomorrow like I am feeling today, I might drop another clue

BWV 1080

Ok here is a hint for one of them


Luke

OK, I know who that is and what you are probably referring to, but struggling to see how that connects to a part of the liturgical calendar  ;D