EJ Moeran

Started by tjguitar, April 15, 2007, 05:18:53 PM

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Luke

It is indeed - which is why I love that picture of Moeran in situ alongside Ireland, on whose Amberley Wild Brooks, written a few months earlier, it seems to me he may have modelled his piece.

I went to Stalham for my own book, naturally... Also the perfect spot for Lonely Waters, whose folksong was collected not far from here.

So I'll go down to some lonely waters,
Go down where no one they shall me find,
Where the pretty little small birds do change their voices,
And every moment blow blustering wild.
 

Roasted Swan

#741
Quote from: Luke on July 08, 2024, 12:51:07 AM....in passing, interesting that in 37 pages there's no mention of the piano music at all apart from Stalham River halfway down a list of HotFXman's favourite Moeran pieces!

Yes that is curious.  Especially since the piano music is instantly appealing and it all fits rather neatly onto a single CD!  "Windmills" from the "Three Fancies" was one of my father's show-off pieces so I knew it before I had any idea or awareness of who E J Moeran was.  The 2nd movement of this suite "Elegy" is about as heavyweight as Moeran's piano music gets - its rather wonderful. 

I suppose because he did not write any major works - no big Baxian Sonatas or brooding depths of Ireland's Sarnia they have not entered the recital repertoire much if at all. 


Roasted Swan

Quote from: Luke on July 08, 2024, 02:42:45 AMIt is indeed - which is why I love that picture of Moeran in situ alongside Ireland, on whose Amberley Wild Brooks, written a few months earlier, it seems to me he may have modelled his piece.

I went to Stalham for my own book, naturally... Also the perfect spot for Lonely Waters, whose folksong was collected not far from here.

So I'll go down to some lonely waters,
Go down where no one they shall me find,
Where the pretty little small birds do change their voices,
And every moment blow blustering wild.
 

"Lonely Waters" is a miniature masterpiece and should always be performed with the ghostly sung final revelation of the melody.... (spoilt in Falletta very good Ulster recording by a far-too present and 'healthy'(!) soprano....

Luke

I love Parkin in this (and in most of what he plays). His twofer of Moeran and Baines is wonderful - Paradise Gardens makes a nice companion to Stalham River (and yes, I went to the Paradise Gardens too....)

Luke

#744
Quote from: Roasted Swan on July 08, 2024, 02:45:14 AM"Lonely Waters" is a miniature masterpiece and should always be performed with the ghostly sung final revelation of the melody.... (spoilt in Falletta very good Ulster recording by a far-too present and 'healthy'(!) soprano....

Agreed! I think that ruins an otherwise lovely recording. Get Robert Wyatt in to do it, or someone similar.

Edit - Robert Wyatt's classical work is necessarily limited, but I love his version of Cage's Wonderful Widow: 

Roasted Swan

Quote from: Luke on July 08, 2024, 02:45:54 AMI love Parkin in this (and in most of what he plays). His twofer of Moeran and Baines is wonderful - Paradise Gardens makes a nice companion to Stalham River (and yes, I went to the Paradise Gardens too....)

Baines and Moeran make good LP-fellows.  Paradise Gardens is a remarkable work - remind me where those Gardens are - wasn't he looking out at a sunset from them...?

Luke

Quote from: Roasted Swan on July 08, 2024, 02:59:48 AMBaines and Moeran make good LP-fellows.  Paradise Gardens is a remarkable work - remind me where those Gardens are - wasn't he looking out at a sunset from them...?

York, the gardens of the Station Hotel as viewed from the city walls at sunset.

Luke

#747
Quote from: Luke on July 08, 2024, 03:49:47 AMYork, the gardens of the Station Hotel as viewed from the city walls at sunset.

The view Baines had: somewhat less paradisiacal, but I still found the experience very moving

Luke

This is the garden itself (sorry for glitchy screenshot):

Roasted Swan

Quote from: Luke on July 08, 2024, 03:49:47 AMYork, the gardens of the Station Hotel as viewed from the city walls at sunset.

thankyou!

Irons

Quote from: calyptorhynchus on July 07, 2024, 10:57:48 PMThat's cos they wore their suits all the time, not just for weddings, funerals and job interviews.

Were there Dry Cleaners then? I should know because I was one - not then I hasten to add!
You must have a very good opinion of yourself to write a symphony - John Ireland.

I opened the door people rushed through and I was left holding the knob - Bo Diddley.

Irons

Quote from: Roasted Swan on July 08, 2024, 02:43:15 AMYes that is curious.  Especially since the piano music is instantly appealing and it all fits rather neatly onto a single CD!  "Windmills" from the "Three Fancies" was one of my father's dhow-off pieces so I knew it before I had any idea or awareness of who E J Moeran was.  The 2nd movement of this suite "Elegy" is about as heavyweight as Moeran's piano music gets - its rather wonderful. 

I suppose because he did not write any major works - no big Baxian Sonatas or brooding depths of Ireland's Sarnia they have not entered the recital repertoire much if at all. 



Iris Loveridge recorded a selection of piano pieces for Richard Itter in an early Lyrita recording. She has nothing like the finesse of Parkin but historically interesting, I think. I own this LP and plan to listen this evening along with the cello sonata.
You must have a very good opinion of yourself to write a symphony - John Ireland.

I opened the door people rushed through and I was left holding the knob - Bo Diddley.

calyptorhynchus

Although I'm mildly bantering Moeran for his drinking one thing that is remarkable about Moeran is how consistent his output is. Almost every work by Moeran is very good, he seems to write at a much higher level of inspiration than many of his contemporaries (and composers generally).

'Many men are melancholy by hearing music, but it is a pleasing melancholy that it causeth.' Robert Burton

Pohjolas Daughter

Quote from: Irons on July 08, 2024, 07:08:36 AMWere there Dry Cleaners then? I should know because I was one - not then I hasten to add!
I found this:  https://j.b5z.net/i/u/10230532/f/drycleaning-historical_developments.pdf

PD
Pohjolas Daughter

Roasted Swan

#754
Quote from: calyptorhynchus on July 08, 2024, 03:13:59 PMAlthough I'm mildly bantering Moeran for his drinking one thing that is remarkable about Moeran is how consistent his output is. Almost every work by Moeran is very good, he seems to write at a much higher level of inspiration than many of his contemporaries (and composers generally).



I have always enjoyed Moeran's music a lot.  For me he is an excellent example of just how good a composer can be without being "important" or "significant" or "great".  His music is recognisably his own - albeit with clear influences - it is well written and attractive and always engaging.

Irons

Quote from: Roasted Swan on July 08, 2024, 10:58:37 PMI have always enjoyed Moeran's music a lot.  For me he is an excellent of just how good a composer can be without being "important" or "significant" or "great".  His music is recognisably his own - albeit with clear influences - it is well written and attractive and always engaging.

Agreed. I might add he led an interesting if tragic life.
You must have a very good opinion of yourself to write a symphony - John Ireland.

I opened the door people rushed through and I was left holding the knob - Bo Diddley.

J

#756
Quote from: Irons on July 09, 2024, 07:53:28 AMAgreed. I might add he led an interesting if tragic life.

Why tragic, - as distinct from more simply just having endured some misfortunes (often self-inflicted, like drinking too much, and taking up with Peter Warlock as he did)?

One could just as easily say that in fact he led a mostly charmed life, at the forefront of which was never having to work for a living, and while alive always getting his music performed.

Irons

Quote from: J on July 11, 2024, 06:35:50 AMWhy tragic, - as distinct from more simply just having endured some misfortunes (often self-inflicted, like drinking too much, and taking up with Peter Warlock as he did)?

One could just as easily say that in fact he led a mostly charmed life, at the forefront of which was never having to work for a living, and while alive always getting his music performed.


https://www.warcomposers.co.uk/moeran
You must have a very good opinion of yourself to write a symphony - John Ireland.

I opened the door people rushed through and I was left holding the knob - Bo Diddley.

J

Quote from: Irons on July 11, 2024, 07:01:31 AMhttps://www.warcomposers.co.uk/moeran

Not that there's any reason to cover the same ground all over again (as earlier in this thread) but Maxwell believes he's largely debunked the war wound "shrapnel in the brain" story as just another plank in the "Moeran Myth" he spends so much time in his book deconstructing (including the causes of Moeran's over propensity for alcohol).

I'd certainly agree with you about the "interest" (and even fascination) adhering to Moeran's life and times and music, but "tragic" I still remain to be convinced of.

Irons

Quote from: J on July 11, 2024, 12:12:41 PMNot that there's any reason to cover the same ground all over again (as earlier in this thread) but Maxwell believes he's largely debunked the war wound "shrapnel in the brain" story as just another plank in the "Moeran Myth" he spends so much time in his book deconstructing (including the causes of Moeran's over propensity for alcohol).

I'd certainly agree with you about the "interest" (and even fascination) adhering to Moeran's life and times and music, but "tragic" I still remain to be convinced of.

You are misquoting my quote. ;D No mention in article above of "shrapnel in the brain".

Of course one man's tragic is another man's not but a marriage to a woman I think Moeran loved (some of his best music written for Peers IMO) breaking up after less then five years is fairly tragic in my book.
You must have a very good opinion of yourself to write a symphony - John Ireland.

I opened the door people rushed through and I was left holding the knob - Bo Diddley.