Paul Juon (1872-1940)

Started by Symphonic Addict, January 24, 2022, 05:37:09 PM

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André


Symphonic Addict

I think that you're referring to this recording, Kyle:



And you're completely spot on. A simply delightful, deep, witty and tuneful piece of music. Andréi, it's a must hear!  ;) ;D
Music is life, and like it, inextinguishable.

I love the vast surface of silence; and it is my chief delight to break it.

Carl Nielsen

André

#22
The YT link has the score as visual background and it does state: op 27. OTOH the caption right underneath says op. 27a. Could the Kammersinfonie be the Octet ? Or a different version/instrumentarium ?

Edit: the back cover of the Musiques suisses CD lists 8 performers, so it would seem the two titles refer to the same work  :)

Symphonic Addict

Exactly, André. Moreover, Wikipedia lists a Kammersinfonie B-Dur for string orchestra, oboe, clarinet, horn, bassoon and piano   after the Octet (1905). Interesting combinations of forces for each of the three versions.
Music is life, and like it, inextinguishable.

I love the vast surface of silence; and it is my chief delight to break it.

Carl Nielsen

kyjo

Quote from: Symphonic Addict on February 26, 2022, 03:17:21 PM
I think that you're referring to this recording, Kyle:



And you're completely spot on. A simply delightful, deep, witty and tuneful piece of music. Andréi, it's a must hear!  ;) ;D

Yeah, it appears that the Octet and the Kammersinfonie are one in the same!
"Music is enough for a lifetime, but a lifetime is not enough for music" - Sergei Rachmaninoff

Symphonic Addict



This CD contains two extraordinary works! Craftsmanship, good tunes, drama, poetry, etc. are elements that run through this music. Both the Piano Sextet in C minor (Piano+'Cello' Quintet) and the Piano Quintet in F major stand among the finest pieces in chamber repertoire IMO.
Music is life, and like it, inextinguishable.

I love the vast surface of silence; and it is my chief delight to break it.

Carl Nielsen

kyjo

Quote from: Symphonic Addict on March 07, 2022, 06:19:33 PM


This CD contains two extraordinary works! Craftsmanship, good tunes, drama, poetry, etc. are elements that run through this music. Both the Piano Sextet in C minor (Piano+'Cello' Quintet) and the Piano Quintet in F major stand among the finest pieces in chamber repertoire IMO.

Absolutely, Cesar! Recently I listened to this disc for the first time:



While I wouldn't place these two works on par with his chamber music in terms of individuality and memorability, I enjoyed them more than the Rhapsodische Sinfonie and Sinfonietta capricciosa on that CPO disc. Vaegtervise is a colorful fantasy on Danish folk songs with some effective use of the chimes, and the Symphony showcases both the German and Russian influences on Juon's music. The first movement (Come Passacaglia) carries some expected Brahmsian echoes, and the scherzo and finale contain the unmistakable Russian stamp of Kalinnikov, Glazunov, and Tchaikovsky. The Moscow SO sound quite a bit more inspired here than they did under a certain other conductor... ;)
"Music is enough for a lifetime, but a lifetime is not enough for music" - Sergei Rachmaninoff

Symphonic Addict

Quote from: kyjo on March 07, 2022, 07:16:05 PM
Absolutely, Cesar! Recently I listened to this disc for the first time:



While I wouldn't place these two works on par with his chamber music in terms of individuality and memorability, I enjoyed them more than the Rhapsodische Sinfonie and Sinfonietta capricciosa on that CPO disc. Vaegtervise is a colorful fantasy on Danish folk songs with some effective use of the chimes, and the Symphony showcases both the German and Russian influences on Juon's music. The first movement (Come Passacaglia) carries some expected Brahmsian echoes, and the scherzo and finale contain the unmistakable Russian stamp of Kalinnikov, Glazunov, and Tchaikovsky. The Moscow SO sound quite a bit more inspired here than they did under a certain other conductor... ;)

Good to know you're enjoying this Sterling releases. I concur with what you say here. There seems to be German craftsmanship and counterpoint, whilst, on the another hand, the Russian-folksy element to the music is present as well. I read elsewhere Rachmaninov though of him like "the Russian Brahms". Along with Taneyev, I could agree with both associations.
Music is life, and like it, inextinguishable.

I love the vast surface of silence; and it is my chief delight to break it.

Carl Nielsen

Symphonic Addict



The more I listen to this composer's music, the more I'm convinced by his talent. I was listening to his Episodes Concertants, a concerto for piano trio and orchestra, and quite an interesting piece it is. It is 38 minutes long where the music seems to oscillate between Romanticism a la Rachmaninov and a sort of slight Neoclassical language. I don't know how to put that into words better, but the final impression is that of a work with substance.
Music is life, and like it, inextinguishable.

I love the vast surface of silence; and it is my chief delight to break it.

Carl Nielsen

Symphonic Addict

I still continue discovering interesting works by this composer. This CD contains music for two violins and piano, and it's a whole joy; little pieces with variegated moods (even folksy at times) full of spark. From the charming Idyll (Silhouettes I) that opens the program one knows that the music is going to be attractive, and effectively it is.

Music is life, and like it, inextinguishable.

I love the vast surface of silence; and it is my chief delight to break it.

Carl Nielsen

Symphonic Addict

Toccata has made some very fine recordings, but this is not one of them I'm afraid, not to mention the performances themselves. I didn't feel the viola sonatas weren't well interpreted (ditto the Romanza for viola and piano), I'm sure they can sound better in the right hands. On the other hand, the Silhouettes for violin viola and piano and the Trio-Miniaturen (for the same forces) managed to captivate me much better. They saved the CD IMO.

Music is life, and like it, inextinguishable.

I love the vast surface of silence; and it is my chief delight to break it.

Carl Nielsen