Hungaroton Fan Club

Started by Dry Brett Kavanaugh, May 07, 2022, 08:50:54 AM

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It was reasonably common, I think, cf. also the later "Hungarian Concerto" by Joseph Joachim or certain pieces by Strauss (Csardas, Gypsy Baron etc.). But supposedly a direct biographical link was that the young Brahms toured with the hungarian violinist Remenyi and they might have played some hungarian/gypsy tunes as encores or in any case Brahms got into contact with that kind of music via Remenyi. In any case it apparently was already "tamed" and partly adapted to the tasts of Salon and concert hall, not the raw authentic ethnic music collected by Bartok a generation or two later.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ede_Rem%C3%A9nyi


Tout le malheur des hommes vient d'une seule chose, qui est de ne savoir pas demeurer en repos, dans une chambre.
- Blaise Pascal

Dry Brett Kavanaugh

Quote from: Mandryka on May 08, 2022, 06:02:54 AM
The Ranki/Rollo Mozart PC 27 is very good. I played it for the first time in a long time this morning and was very impressed. Andrianne Csengeri in Kurtag is special -- the one in the pic is good, but they're all good. Cziffra made several recordings in for Hungaroton -- they're all outstanding. Ranki's Haydn is quite distinctive -- I like what he does with the music more than anyone else who uses a modern piano.

I also listened to the Faidit CD last night -- the singers are very fine I think. And some of the Bakfark - I have the whole set and it's too much for more than half an hour, but it's fine music, committed and characterful playing and the lute sounds slightly like a banjo, which is good.

While Ranki's Mozart PC and Haydn recordings sound very good, I was impressed by his Ravel works. A lot of space and delicate nuances in his very sensitive performance- a sort of "iki" style.  ;D
The Kurtag is innovative and new music. Atmospheric and inspiring.

Dry Brett Kavanaugh

Quote from: Mandryka on May 09, 2022, 07:51:48 PM
Does anyone know the connection between the Brahms waltzes and the Liszt Rhapsodies? Presumably one inspired the other, or was this sort of stuff common at the time?

Astonishing that Cziffra could think of giving a concert with 21 Hungarian Waltzes! Who would do that now? In a way, it's too much - like the world's greatest display of fireworks which goes on slightly longer than it should. After a while you feel the need for an introspective intimate spiritual slow movement, but there ain't one!

I listened to quite a bit of the Senlis box last night. In addition to the Brahms there's a fabulous Couperin recital, a Chopin recital which didn't have an impact on me, though it could be excellent. There's also a Liszt recital, but I couldn't possibly listen to the Brahms AND the Liszt in the same week, so I didn't play it.

Sound is listenable, in a way rather good in that the piano timbre is caught - but clearly old live recordings. I think that old sound has its own charms actually, all part of the experience.

There is no strong evidence for connection. However, possibly, L may have influenced B according to this author. Just a possibility. Please read pp 16-7.

https://macsphere.mcmaster.ca/bitstream/11375/11150/1/fulltext.pdf

Mandryka

#23
Quote from: Dry Brett Kavanaugh on May 11, 2022, 01:42:05 PM


While Ranki's Mozart PC and Haydn recordings sound very good, I was impressed by his Ravel works. A lot of space and delicate nuances in his very sensitive performance- a sort of "iki" style.  ;D
The Kurtag is innovative and new music. Atmospheric and inspiring.

What Kurtag? I have a radio recording of a concert with him playing some Bach/Kurtag.

For iki style Ravel try Pogorelich's waltzes. Ranki made a recording of a couple of movements from Ma mère l'oye with Kocsis, from memory it was good, but Im not sure.
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Mandryka

I forgot a good Hungaroton - I'm a bit allergic to the music, but I can tolerate this performance.

Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Dry Brett Kavanaugh

Quote from: Mandryka on May 11, 2022, 06:56:15 PM
What Kurtag? I have a radio recording of a concert with him playing some Bach/Kurtag.

For iki style Ravel try Pogorelich's waltzes. Ranki made a recording of a couple of movements from Ma mère l'oye with Kocsis, from memory it was good, but Im not sure.

I meant Kafka Fragments. The music is surreal and aesthetic. I like it a lot.
Not a big fan of Pogorelich, but will look for the recording, plus the Ranki/Kocsis.
The Ranki/Ravel above was probably played slow, but it didn't sound slow. A lot of air and space- like Miles Davis. Each notes breath and shine. The recording sound is not crystal clear, but it is good/fair.

Dry Brett Kavanaugh

Quote from: Mandryka on May 08, 2022, 06:42:02 PM
Yes, there's a lot to enjoy in Hungaroton. But my reason for posting is to say that if you really want to hear the Hungarian dances played in a jaw dropping way, you need to find this



One thing which makes the Faidit so nice is the singing of Gérard Le Vot. He's got a couple of other Troubadours recordings.

The only other thing I've enjoyed from Peter Ella is an Art of Fugue on harpsichord - I'm not sure where I got it from.

The Cziffra 4 disc box arrived. Such a fun, great recording. The Hungarian Dance is wonderful and incredible.
I forgot to mention the disc below. Especially, Rhapsody in Blue is amazing. Of course Cziffra sounds passionate and wonderful, but the orchestra performs excellent too imo. Cziffra and the orchestra are Hungarians, but by listening to their performance I am certain that they understand and dig the bluesy/jazzy feel of the work.  The music swings.




Irons

On the LP front Hungaroton is a treasure-trove for a collector.



Names like Miklos Perenyi (cello) and Konstanty Kulka (violin) set the vinyl pulse racing but even more interesting are artists every bit as good as those in the West but completely unknown due to their Soviet masters not allowing them out of the Eastern Bloc.

Qualiton was a sister label of Hungaroton.



You must have a very good opinion of yourself to write a symphony - John Ireland.

Mandryka

Quote from: Irons on June 03, 2022, 12:26:06 AM
On the LP front Hungaroton is a treasure-trove for a collector.



Names like Miklos Perenyi (cello) and Konstanty Kulka (violin) set the vinyl pulse racing but even more interesting are artists every bit as good as those in the West but completely unknown due to their Soviet masters not allowing them out of the Eastern Bloc.

Qualiton was a sister label of Hungaroton.



Mihaly Bacher recorded some lovely Mozart sonatas with Denes Kovacs. They're in the Denes Kovacs series on Doremi.
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Dry Brett Kavanaugh

Quote from: Irons on June 03, 2022, 12:26:06 AM
On the LP front Hungaroton is a treasure-trove for a collector.


They look interesting! I will look for the recordings!

Roy Bland


Irons

Quote from: Mandryka on June 03, 2022, 01:08:54 AM
Mihaly Bacher recorded some lovely Mozart sonatas with Denes Kovacs. They're in the Denes Kovacs series on Doremi.

Good to hear he resurfaced. A fine pianist.
You must have a very good opinion of yourself to write a symphony - John Ireland.

Dry Brett Kavanaugh


Irons

Another Qualiton recording. The Bartok SQ went on to record complete Beethoven String Quartets for Hungaroton. This issue particularly interesting for Lajtha.

You must have a very good opinion of yourself to write a symphony - John Ireland.

Scion7

Bartok Quartet does a good job on the Bartok string qts,  but IMO the one's to beat are still the first Julliard Quartet versions from the Sixties (Columbia) and the Budapest Quartet on Hyperion.

There are some nice oddities stuff on Hungaroton, the artwork of which caught my eye and made me grab them:



(Bruckner's) is the career of a poor village boy ... The one and only really surprising thing about him was that after completing his career as an organist he suddenly began to compose music with a range of vision which in such a man would appear quite incongruous.

Irons

#35
Quote from: Scion7 on November 21, 2022, 04:22:43 AM
Bartok Quartet does a good job on the Bartok string qts,  but IMO the one's to beat are still the first Julliard Quartet versions from the Sixties (Columbia) and the Budapest Quartet on Hyperion.

There are some nice oddities stuff on Hungaroton, the artwork of which caught my eye and made me grab them:

No argument there. I listened to Bartok's 3rd Quartet from the Julliard SQ only last week. On LP the set is (in)famous as a system test. Can sound shrill and hard but from well balanced and sorted
vinyl playing setup sounds wonderful. The stereo Bartok set on DG from the Hungarian SQ is excellent too.

Edit: The 60's set from the Julliard is the second set of the Bartok quartets of three. Earlier set in the 1950's. 
You must have a very good opinion of yourself to write a symphony - John Ireland.

Dry Brett Kavanaugh

Quote from: Irons on November 21, 2022, 01:55:20 AM
Another Qualiton recording. The Bartok SQ went on to record complete Beethoven String Quartets for Hungaroton. This issue particularly interesting for Lajtha.



Cool and sharp cover!




Quote from: Scion7 on November 21, 2022, 04:22:43 AM
Bartok Quartet does a good job on the Bartok string qts,  but IMO the one's to beat are still the first Julliard Quartet versions from the Sixties (Columbia) and the Budapest Quartet on Hyperion.

There are some nice oddities stuff on Hungaroton, the artwork of which caught my eye and made me grab them:

The cover art of Liszt piano album looks terrific. I think the below is the cover of the cd. Certainly I prefer the original jacket. Anyway I will check the album.










Irons

You must have a very good opinion of yourself to write a symphony - John Ireland.