Author Topic: Your All-time 5 Favorite Literary Works  (Read 1755 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline vandermolen

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 24484
  • Location: Rotherfield, Sussex, UK
Re: Your All-time 5 Favorite Literary Works
« Reply #120 on: June 12, 2022, 07:42:32 AM »
A slightly related issue (for me) is that books for children tend to have a lot of illustrations whereas books for adult readers have few or no illustrations. Personally I don’t think this is a good idea/custom. Sophisticated, artistic illustrations in books for adults would enhance the impact of stories as well as the artistic quality of whole books. The price would increase for such books with illustrations, but I would gladly pay for higher price.
An interesting point Manabu. I like the original illustrations in the Sherlock Holmes stories and in children's classics like the Wind in the Willows and Winnie the Pooh.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline vandermolen

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 24484
  • Location: Rotherfield, Sussex, UK
Re: Your All-time 5 Favorite Literary Works
« Reply #121 on: June 12, 2022, 07:46:47 AM »
I didn't like the The Castafiore Emerald at all as a kid, I still find it too "meta-level".
My favorite is probably "The Calculus Affair" and the "Double" with the Treasure of Rackham. Tim in Tibet was supposed to be Hergé's own favorite but I think that was also connected to his personal situation (divorce and depression or so)
I liked the Castafiore Emerald for it's humour (Mr Bolt the builder for example) and because it has no villain (except the magpie). Professor Calculus's experimental colour television was also fun for my much younger self.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).