Symphony No. 1 in C Minor, Op. 2b (Sinfonia Solenne)

Started by krummholz, May 31, 2022, 06:16:27 PM

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lunar22

in the end, it's what you want to say with the piece that counts and must determine the ending. It's easy enough to justify the use of a certain key or other technical means in retrospect. For instance if the work doesn't end in the tonic, you could simply call it "a new departure" or perhaps even Nielsen's "progressive tonalty" (OK-- that's perhaps a stretch ;D  but with luck you get my drift)

krummholz

Quote from: lunar22 on June 23, 2024, 07:06:10 AMin the end, it's what you want to say with the piece that counts and must determine the ending. It's easy enough to justify the use of a certain key or other technical means in retrospect. For instance if the work doesn't end in the tonic, you could simply call it "a new departure" or perhaps even Nielsen's "progressive tonalty" (OK-- that's perhaps a stretch ;D  but with luck you get my drift)

Actually, it *isn't* too much. Although it begins and ends in the same key, this piece relies very much on Nielsen's view of a key as provisional, that can be opposed or supplanted by another key. And I was actually thinking of ending it in a different key: F minor, though that would be too easy; or F major, which I realised would seem too "magical". By the middle of the coda, the C minor - C major - F minor axis has been established pretty strongly, and some changes I made earlier strengthen the feeling that the only key that can dislodge C at this point is F. But if not F, then C, and C major doesn't quite work. So I'm left with C minor.

You're right in part that what I want to say in the piece is important. So maybe the new ending doesn't *need* to be so dark and final. But it now seems to me the only way the piece could end, especially after the most ecstatic part, with florid counterpoint in the strings alone, is not allowed to blossom before being cut off by the darker closing passage just before the Coda. There are enough intimations of trombone growlings throughout to justify even that last chord.