Some rare overexcitement moments during concerts.

Started by PeterWillem, September 24, 2022, 01:22:00 PM

Previous topic - Next topic

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

PeterWillem

A short story, maybe some of you can understand that. I went today to Concertgebouw in Amsterdam to have a listen of Bruckner 8th (+ lovely Wantenaar violin concerto). After many years of classical music listening experience, for the first time I had a chance to listen to Bruckner in a concert (though I deeply love him, I understand why it's not very popular). Until now, I was a big fan of Celibidache, late Karajan and late Wand versions which are more on the slow/grand side of interpretation. So when today's 8th started I was initally annoyed by the very fast tempo. However, after few minutes, I just got so agitated by the passages in the middle of Allegro that I just went on with the flow of the music. At the end of Adagio, when the main motiv is being played loudly, I literally got overwhelmed with emotions so when the 3rd part ended I had to fight with myself to not start clapping. It was just very hard to contain myself and to not do anything when the silence between parts came in. Thankfully, the finale came quickly and brutally so it cleared my mind a bit. After the final brass chords (one of the very magical moments) on the other hand, I started clapping first in the whole hall (and I'm rather a shy introvert) and it took me few minutes to reorganize myself so I could actually stand up from me seat and go out. I've never thought I love Bruckner so much until I've heard his work at the concert hall. I've had some kind of similar experience during Mahler's 9th but I thought it was because that symphony has a special place in my heart and the interpretation was really immersive (Fischer/Budapest Orchestra). Though then it was the opposite - the final Adagio was so sad that no one clapped for almost a minute after the end. It was very moving and going back to normal life (i.e. catch a proper tram and train) was hard but possible. After today's Bruckner 8th it was impossible to reconnect. I missed my train.

Brewski

Quote from: PeterWillem on September 24, 2022, 01:22:00 PM
A short story, maybe some of you can understand that. I went today to Concertgebouw in Amsterdam to have a listen of Bruckner 8th (+ lovely Wantenaar violin concerto). After many years of classical music listening experience, for the first time I had a chance to listen to Bruckner in a concert (though I deeply love him, I understand why it's not very popular). Until now, I was a big fan of Celibidache, late Karajan and late Wand versions which are more on the slow/grand side of interpretation. So when today's 8th started I was initally annoyed by the very fast tempo. However, after few minutes, I just got so agitated by the passages in the middle of Allegro that I just went on with the flow of the music. At the end of Adagio, when the main motiv is being played loudly, I literally got overwhelmed with emotions so when the 3rd part ended I had to fight with myself to not start clapping. It was just very hard to contain myself and to not do anything when the silence between parts came in. Thankfully, the finale came quickly and brutally so it cleared my mind a bit. After the final brass chords (one of the very magical moments) on the other hand, I started clapping first in the whole hall (and I'm rather a shy introvert) and it took me few minutes to reorganize myself so I could actually stand up from me seat and go out. I've never thought I love Bruckner so much until I've heard his work at the concert hall. I've had some kind of similar experience during Mahler's 9th but I thought it was because that symphony has a special place in my heart and the interpretation was really immersive (Fischer/Budapest Orchestra). Though then it was the opposite - the final Adagio was so sad that no one clapped for almost a minute after the end. It was very moving and going back to normal life (i.e. catch a proper tram and train) was hard but possible. After today's Bruckner 8th it was impossible to reconnect. I missed my train.

Thank you for sharing this, sounds like a lovely experience.

My first visit to the Concertgebouw was to hear Chailly and the RCOA in the very same piece. I grew up with Haitink's version, and had heard it live with other groups here and there. But all of those seemed to fade into the background, hearing it in that magnificent Amsterdam hall. I can well understand your reaction!

Congratulations on hearing it live. Recordings are great, but it really makes an enormous difference.

--Bruce
"I set down a beautiful chord on paper—and suddenly it rusts."

- Alfred Schnittke

Twitter: @BruceHodgesNY

PeterWillem

Thank you for your comment Bruce.
The acoustics in Het Concertgebouw are probably the best I've ever encountered. All my recordings sounds flat now ;) Anyway, I plan to go back to Haitink recordings today.

LKB

Quote from: PeterWillem on September 25, 2022, 02:13:23 AM
Thank you for your comment Bruce.
The acoustics in Het Concertgebouw are probably the best I've ever encountered. All my recordings sounds flat now ;) Anyway, I plan to go back to Haitink recordings today.


For years my favorite recording of the Eighth:

https://www.amazon.com/Bruckner-Symphony-Minor-Wagner-Siegfried-Idyll/dp/B00000E2SV

And on YouTube:

https://youtu.be/sjSRv3MDQHU

Haitink was one of the great Bruckner conductors, and we're lucky that he is fairly well-represented on record with a number of leading orchestras.
Mit Flügeln, die ich mir errungen...

lordlance