Classical Music Suggestions

Started by Shatera, January 30, 2023, 07:23:36 PM

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Shatera

Hello! I am new to classical music. Can you guys give me some suggestions of what to listen to?

71 dB

Quote from: Shatera on January 30, 2023, 07:23:36 PMHello! I am new to classical music. Can you guys give me some suggestions of what to listen to?

Hello Shatera and welcome! It can certainly be intimidating to explore classical music, because there is much of it out there and it can be difficult to know where to begin. Often people recommend some well-known works by the most famous composer and that's of course one way to start. There is no right and wrong ways to do this. There is only our own ways. Exploration should be interesting, enjoyable and fun. You can for example sample works from different time periods: Early music (before 1400), Renaissance (1400-1600), Baroque (1600-1750), Classisism (1750-1830), Romantic/late romantic (1830-1920) and Post war/contemporary (1920-today) and see how much you are into it. Also, you can try different genre (solo instrument, chamber, orchestral, choral, etc.). I think oftentimes orchestral music from the romantic era are the "easy way" into the World or classical music. Grieg's Piano Concerto Op. 16 for example.
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#2
I'm like you but in rock music.  You might also want to consider a traversal through time depending on the style you like as music generally gets more complex/bigger through time, sometimes it's worthwhile to start early like Vivaldi's Four Seasons, then Handel, etc., up through modern music rather than starting with something overly complicated and modern.  It's not a bad idea to track down a course (Robert Greenberg has excellent courses on overview of the Symphony that spans centuries but connects them logically with a good blend of informational and humor without being condescending).  This approach is sort of like learning about wine tasting or any art, learning how to appreciate what makes something good.  One other idea, if you are a new fan of classical music, what music have you heard that you liked so much to explore further, and we can suggest a reasonable next step. 

Daverz

The easiest way to become familiar with the basic repretoire is internet radio stations.  When you hear something you like, make a note of it.  I like KUSC.

https://www.kusc.org/radio/how-to-listen/


Wanderer

Quote from: Shatera on January 30, 2023, 07:23:36 PMHello! I am new to classical music. Can you guys give me some suggestions of what to listen to?

Hello and welcome! See how you like these works for starters:

Haydn: Symphony No. 94
Mozart: Symphony No. 38
Mozart: Piano Concerto No. 22
Beethoven: Symphony No. 3
Beethoven: Piano Concerto No. 5
Beethoven: Violin Concerto
Brahms: Symphony No. 1
Brahms: Piano Concerto No. 1
Schumann: Piano Concerto
Berlioz: Symphonie fantastique
Mendelssohn: "A Midsummer Night's Dream" Overture
Mendelssohn: "Hebrides" Overture
Rimsky-Korsakov: Scheherazade


mouseyhairedlabrat

I recommend Drei Sonaten #1, WoO 47 (composed 1782-83) by L. V. Beethoven. He literally wrote it when he was 12 years old.

luk