Author Topic: Granville Bantock (1868-1946)  (Read 35932 times)

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Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Granville Bantock (1868-1946)
« Reply #200 on: August 22, 2021, 06:12:33 PM »
I can't get enough especially of A Celtic Symphony. It's an authentic tapestry of Celtic sounds and fine filigree of themes and tunes.

Same here. I think it’s a marvelous work and I’ll definitely be revisiting (probably tomorrow).

There are 2 versions of it, one almost complete on 2 discs in great sound, the other absolutely complete on 4 discs (+other material, all of which is already in the Hyperion box) in quite good sound. Although this may appear like too much of a good thing, the complete Omar is a fascinating work. The treatment of the oriental subject by Bantock is luxuriant, very evocative, with some stunning moments.

The 4-disc Lyrita set is actually cheaper than the 2-cd one on Chandos.

Thanks, Andre. I’ll probably spring for the Handley if I do decide to get it. The fidelity on the Lyrita set isn’t that great.
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Offline Roasted Swan

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Re: Granville Bantock (1868-1946)
« Reply #201 on: August 22, 2021, 10:09:32 PM »
Here's a quote from the Presto website:

"The first edition of Fitzgerald's verse translation of “The Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyám” had been on the scene since the mid-nineteenth century. By the end of that century it had achieved fiv e editions and quasi-Shakespearean status. The quatrains are rich in quotations — extracts eventually took up multiple columns in the Oxford Dictionary of Quotations. The subject matter was also daringly anti-religious and must have had an appeal to the increasingly literate, sceptical, and professional classes. Havergal Brian quotes Ernest Newman on the subject of Bantock’s Omar: “…it brings into English secular music, for the first time, the thoughts and feelings of men brought up in the full tide of modern culture and modern humanism.”

The work is scored for three soloists, a large chorus and a very large orchestra. The strings are divided into two complete string orchestras, one on either side of the conductor, a device by which Bantock procured a number of new a nd subtle effects. In the first decade of the twentieth century no other secularphilosophical work existed on such a scale.

Omar was widely performed during the first half of the 20th century, but since Bantock’s death in 1946, performances have been dependent on anniversaries and external historic events.

This studio recording was the product of 11 years planning by a single BBC producer determined to preserve one of the most astounding choral works ever created. It remains, 37 years later, the only complete recording ever made of the work."

Some very interesting points made there.  I read the final two lines about 11 years of planning and offer (another!) prayer of thanks for the BBC.  For the music collector - and espeically anyone interested in Bantock - I think the BBC/Lyrita recording is an obligatory purchase.  I think I prefer Del Mar's performance in any case regardless of sonic quality.

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Granville Bantock (1868-1946)
« Reply #202 on: August 23, 2021, 11:31:58 PM »
Same here. I think it’s a marvelous work and I’ll definitely be revisiting (probably tomorrow).

Thanks, Andre. I’ll probably spring for the Handley if I do decide to get it. The fidelity on the Lyrita set isn’t that great.
Big thumbs up for the Celtic Symphony - which I've seen live  0:)
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).