Author Topic: Sir William Walton  (Read 75744 times)

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Offline SonicMan46

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Re: Sir William Walton
« Reply #680 on: August 09, 2021, 06:32:17 AM »
Agree with all RS's points. Before I give up completely with my Walton Film Music recommendations let me recommend this one which features no narration in Henry V. I much prefer Sargent's Henry V Suite to Muir Mathieson's as the Sargent features the moving and atmospheric 'Prelude - The Globe'. This is the same CD with different covers:

Dave - more a film buff thing and something we've touched on a few times here..... the story behind Walton's score for The Battle of Britain is fascinating (and its a great score too).  Walton's old mate Sir Larry is in the film (and very good he is too).  Walton produces a score but its deemed not enough music to fill an LP/OST.  So the producers dump Walton and bring in "safe pair of hands" Ron Goodwin.  Goodwin has NO IDEA this is happening!  Sir Larry goes all Luvvy and threatens to have his name removed from the credits unless Walton's name is retained in the film.  The compromise is that the final "Battle in the Air" sequence by Walton is kept in the film (actually conducted by another old mate of Walton - Malcolm Arnold).  The story goes that Walton ran out of time and ideas for this section so Arnold wrote/orchestrated AND conducted musch of what you hear - it does sound very Arnold-esque.

For many years it was assumed that the original session recordings of the Walton score were lost - not so.  The bit I love is that the early DVD release of Battle of Britain (NOT the blu-ray - crying shame....) gave the viewer the option of watching the film with either the Walton score (complete) or the Goodwin/Walton hybrid.  Its a fascinating study in the emotional impact of music in a film.  Take the opening credits - Walton wrote a "Crown Imperial" noble British march and Goodwin a kind of jaunty Germanic one.  If you can (and are interested!) try and see this..

   

Thanks again Guys - love RS's comments above - BTW, I do own the 9-BD The World at War set narrated by Olivier, who does a great job!  Furthermore, the blu-ray restoration is spectacular (Amazon has some side by side comparisons and I'm sure others are on the web).  I'm a BIG war buff, especially of the American Revolution and the Civil War - living in North Carolina puts you right in the middle of the historic events of these wars.  Dave :)

Offline Roasted Swan

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Re: Sir William Walton
« Reply #681 on: August 09, 2021, 08:17:10 AM »
Thanks again Guys - love RS's comments above - BTW, I do own the 9-BD The World at War set narrated by Olivier, who does a great job!  Furthermore, the blu-ray restoration is spectacular (Amazon has some side by side comparisons and I'm sure others are on the web).  I'm a BIG war buff, especially of the American Revolution and the Civil War - living in North Carolina puts you right in the middle of the historic events of these wars.  Dave :)

Ah! The World at War - I remember watching that SO clearly when it was first run.  Sunday afternoons on ITV as I recall.  I just googled it - 1973 - so I was 12 and absolutely riveted.  That Carl Davis theme is seared into my brain (and the title sequence I can see in my mind's eye as I write this).  Olivier's rather laconic delivery of the narration was brilliant in its understatedness!

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Sir William Walton
« Reply #682 on: August 09, 2021, 08:27:49 AM »
Ah! The World at War - I remember watching that SO clearly when it was first run.  Sunday afternoons on ITV as I recall.  I just googled it - 1973 - so I was 12 and absolutely riveted.  That Carl Davis theme is seared into my brain (and the title sequence I can see in my mind's eye as I write this).  Olivier's rather laconic delivery of the narration was brilliant in its understatedness!
Totally agree - I watched it first time round on TV (aged 17) and then in the 'TV Room' (like a cinema with a TV in it) when I was at university. Oh dear - I think I need that Blu-Ray set although I have the DVD boxed set  ::)
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline SonicMan46

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Re: Sir William Walton
« Reply #683 on: August 09, 2021, 08:31:50 AM »
Ah! The World at War - I remember watching that SO clearly when it was first run.  Sunday afternoons on ITV as I recall.  I just googled it - 1973 - so I was 12 and absolutely riveted.  That Carl Davis theme is seared into my brain (and the title sequence I can see in my mind's eye as I write this).  Olivier's rather laconic delivery of the narration was brilliant in its understatedness!

Same here, i.e. first watched when showing in the USA, then bought when the BD package was restored and released (end of 2017) - for the holidays I replaced my old 42" HDTV w/ a 50" 4K Sony - must rewatch to see if the image is upscaled, and will be more impressive on the larger screen.  Dave :)

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Sir William Walton
« Reply #684 on: August 09, 2021, 08:34:01 AM »
I also have this CD:
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline SonicMan46

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Re: Sir William Walton
« Reply #685 on: August 09, 2021, 09:53:59 AM »
Totally agree - I watched it first time round on TV (aged 17) and then in the 'TV Room' (like a cinema with a TV in it) when I was at university. Oh dear - I think I need that Blu-Ray set although I have the DVD boxed set  ::)

Well, the reviews are terrific, HERE1 & HERE2 - now for the version that I own the aspect ratio was restored from the 4:3 original to 16:9 to best fit current HDTV - some have complained, as discussed in the reviews.  Apparently, there is a more recent restoration using the original 4:3 aspect ratio (second image below), BUT as described on Amazon USA, playback is only for Region B/2 - SO, for those wanting to upgrade to the blu-ray restorations and have a definite preference for aspect ratio, then pay close attention as to the regional playback.  NOW, if a 4:3 BD Region 1 becomes available would I get yet another copy, don't know?  But, I might stream if a possibility?  Dave :)

 

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Sir William Walton
« Reply #686 on: August 09, 2021, 10:17:24 PM »
Well, the reviews are terrific, HERE1 & HERE2 - now for the version that I own the aspect ratio was restored from the 4:3 original to 16:9 to best fit current HDTV - some have complained, as discussed in the reviews.  Apparently, there is a more recent restoration using the original 4:3 aspect ratio (second image below), BUT as described on Amazon USA, playback is only for Region B/2 - SO, for those wanting to upgrade to the blu-ray restorations and have a definite preference for aspect ratio, then pay close attention as to the regional playback.  NOW, if a 4:3 BD Region 1 becomes available would I get yet another copy, don't know?  But, I might stream if a possibility?  Dave :)

 
Thanks Dave. I have a multi-region DVD player but it only plays Region 2 Blu-Ray.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline SonicMan46

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Re: Sir William Walton
« Reply #687 on: August 20, 2021, 12:37:51 PM »
String Quartets, an early one from 1922 and later work from 1947 - enjoying the performances of the Emperor Quartet - the two quartets are as expected different; the earlier one evokes Bartok, Berg and others from that era; the latter more mature Walton - several reviews attached if interested; there appear to be a considerable number of recordings of these quartets, usually the second one and typically combined w/ other composers.  This was an inexpensive 'used' CD from the Amazon MP which played fine.  Dave :)