Last Movie You Watched

Started by Drasko, April 06, 2007, 07:51:03 AM

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Karl Henning

Quote from: Bachtoven on February 10, 2024, 01:25:55 PMWay overhyped and a pale imitation of the book. 6/10 stars

A pity, it's quite a story.
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Cato

Quote from: Karl Henning on February 10, 2024, 01:09:56 PMSomewhat similarly, I saw no reason for the 2006 Omen, which was essentially an unimaginative re-shoot of the script from the original.



Yes, the original, with Gregory Peck and David Warner, was magnificently eerie!
"Meet Miss Ruth Sherwood, from Columbus, Ohio, the Middle of the Universe!"

- Brian Aherne introducing Rosalind Russell in  My Sister Eileen (1942)

Karl Henning

Conan the Barbarian redux. Now that I know the lie of the land, as it were, I don't seem to find the pacing tedious. Also, I appreciate it better visually. And Max von Sydow is of course magnificent. 
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Karl Henning

Quote from: Karl Henning on February 11, 2024, 04:05:44 PMConan the Barbarian redux. Now that I know the lie of the land, as it were, I don't seem to find the pacing tedious. Also, I appreciate it better visually. And Max von Sydow is of course magnificent.
I do almost wish, though, that Jas Earl Jones would say "Cwucify him," and that Ahnold would defy him with "My name is Íñigo Montoya. You killed my mother. Prepare to die!"
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

relm1

Quote from: Cato on February 10, 2024, 01:55:45 PMYes, the original, with Gregory Peck and David Warner, was magnificently eerie!

Agreed.  Around that time, they did quite a few poor reboots.  Remember this inferior reboot of the 1950 classic? 



I felt like the reboot team might not have even seen the original so it missed on so many levels.

Cato

Quote from: relm1 on February 12, 2024, 05:33:21 AMAgreed.  Around that time, they did quite a few poor reboots.  Remember this inferior reboot of the 1950 classic? 



I felt like the reboot team might not have even seen the original so it missed on so many levels.


For too many years now, Hollywood has loved only old ideas.

Anything original is viewed with skepticism and relegated to "little" independent studios.

The situation of constantly reusing old stuff - or using dumb stuff! - in new packaging has given comedian Ryan George a career satirizing the (incompetent? unimaginative? stupid?) executives approving the stuff:


e.g.


(Hysterical!)  ;D




"Meet Miss Ruth Sherwood, from Columbus, Ohio, the Middle of the Universe!"

- Brian Aherne introducing Rosalind Russell in  My Sister Eileen (1942)

Karl Henning

Quote from: Cato on February 05, 2024, 04:47:21 PMExcellent!


For the score of The Unforgiven by Dmitri Tiomkin:



Albert Salmi & Joseph Wiseman!
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Karl Henning

Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Dry Brett Kavanaugh

Some good ideas but I got tired in the middle of the movie as there was no significant story.



Karl Henning

Quote from: Dry Brett Kavanaugh on February 12, 2024, 07:18:17 PMSome good ideas but I got tired in the middle of the movie as there was no significant story.



Yeah, basically, "we ought not to have done this." Kind of an empty suit.
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Cato

Concerning The Unforgiven (1960), with Burt Lancaster, Audrey Hepburn, and the great Lilian Gish....


Quote from: Cato on February 05, 2024, 04:47:21 PMFor the score of The Unforgiven by Dmitri Tiomkin:








Two character actors not to be forgotten:


Quote from: Karl Henning on February 12, 2024, 05:45:27 PMAlbert Salmi & Joseph Wiseman!




Albert Salmi is a scene stealer in The Brothers Karamazov with Yul Brynner and Richard Basehart.


"Meet Miss Ruth Sherwood, from Columbus, Ohio, the Middle of the Universe!"

- Brian Aherne introducing Rosalind Russell in  My Sister Eileen (1942)

DavidW

Quote from: Karl Henning on February 12, 2024, 08:09:16 PMYeah, basically, "we ought not to have done this." Kind of an empty suit.

It is quite a bit deeper than that!  Michael Crichton has frequently used his novels to warn about the danger of scientific progress without regard to ethics.  As this was in the time of mapping the human genome, cloning etc. it seems like an appropriate cautionary tale and not just "guess we shouldn't have made dinosaurs."  It is an allegory.

The movie focuses on the action set pieces, but did you really think that the long winded asides into mathematics, biology and metaphysics present in the novel would have been riveting in a Hollywood blockbuster?

71 dB

#36352
Quote from: Dry Brett Kavanaugh on February 12, 2024, 07:18:17 PMSome good ideas but I got tired in the middle of the movie as there was no significant story.

What significant story should there have been? The dangers, consequences and moral dilemmas of tinkering with nature aren't significant enough? Jurassic Park is brilliantly directed (Spielberg), scored (John Williams) and well acted popcorn entertainment that 30 years ago set the standards for cgi based special effects that even today hold up pretty well. Jurassic Park is not my favorite Spielberg movie (because Spielberg has so insanely good movies such as Schindler's List), but it is imo really really good and enjoyable.

It is interesting how differently we experience movie. A really entertaining movie to some people can be a borefest to some other people... each to their own. That is why I don't recommend movies to anyone and almost never take recommentions from other people. What's the point when tastes differ so much?
Spatial distortion is a serious problem deteriorating headphone listening.
Crossfeeders reduce spatial distortion and make the sound more natural
and less tiresome in headphone listening.

My Sound Cloud page <-- NEW Jan. 2024 "Harpeggiator"

71 dB

#36353
The Twin (Taneli Mustonen, 2022) TV

This caught my attention because it is a Finnish movie starring Australian actress Teresa Palmer who has made pretty impressive career in slow budget horror movies. I decided to check it out. The movie is mediocre, but for a Finnish movie not bad at all. It copies American small budget horror movies. The use of sound is a bit amateur compared to American productions. Panu Aaltio's score is nothing to write home about (music in Finnish movies tend to be simple and lame). Taneli Mustonen directs pretty well. The movie happens in Finland almost completely, but only a few words are heard in Finnish and this movie is targeted on international market and is almost completely in english.

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt12390572/?ref_=vp_close
Spatial distortion is a serious problem deteriorating headphone listening.
Crossfeeders reduce spatial distortion and make the sound more natural
and less tiresome in headphone listening.

My Sound Cloud page <-- NEW Jan. 2024 "Harpeggiator"

Karl Henning

Quote from: DavidW on February 13, 2024, 04:42:39 AMIt is quite a bit deeper than that!  Michael Crichton has frequently used his novels to warn about the danger of scientific progress without regard to ethics.  As this was in the time of mapping the human genome, cloning etc. it seems like an appropriate cautionary tale and not just "guess we shouldn't have made dinosaurs."  It is an allegory.

The movie focuses on the action set pieces, but did you really think that the long winded asides into mathematics, biology and metaphysics present in the novel would have been riveting in a Hollywood blockbuster?
I was unfairly snide, and yours are germane points.
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Cato

For your consideration: in discussing Lillian Gish's appearance in The Unforgiven, I remembered an electrifying silent film she made, in fact her last silent movie (1928):


The Wind!


https://vimeo.com/122341653
"Meet Miss Ruth Sherwood, from Columbus, Ohio, the Middle of the Universe!"

- Brian Aherne introducing Rosalind Russell in  My Sister Eileen (1942)

Karl Henning

#36356
Last night, at the suggestion of our @Cato ... The Unforgiven
I admit (and this may tickle @LKB ) that Dances With Wolves was the first western I genuinely enjoyed, and that fact must reveal something of what I bring to the genre.
I was amused by the idea of Ben Zachary (Burt Lancaster) bringing a piano from Wichita (this was the era of the Kansas/Nebraska Teritory, I suppose) delivering it at home in Texas, and listen! It's still in tune! As with John Ford's The Searchers, in many ways, the racism is the most interesting element. Cash Zachary turning on his own sister (Rachel, played by Audrey Hepburn). Ma Rawlins turning so viciously on Rachel. Ma Zachary (Lillian Gish) taking the hanging of Abe Kelsey (Jos. Wiseman) in her own hands because he is revealing the truth which she has suppressed all these years. The contrast with the delicacy with which Rachel comes to terms with her identity, her willingness to go "back" to her blood brother, though one sees how that could not fly in this screenplay. (And an interesting intersection with Costner's much later film.)
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Dry Brett Kavanaugh

Quote from: DavidW on February 13, 2024, 04:42:39 AMIt is quite a bit deeper than that!  Michael Crichton has frequently used his novels to warn about the danger of scientific progress without regard to ethics.  As this was in the time of mapping the human genome, cloning etc. it seems like an appropriate cautionary tale and not just "guess we shouldn't have made dinosaurs."  It is an allegory.

The movie focuses on the action set pieces, but did you really think that the long winded asides into mathematics, biology and metaphysics present in the novel would have been riveting in a Hollywood blockbuster?


For majority of the time in movie, people and kids are just running from dinosaurs. Philosophical/notmative questions are presented superficially and it may irritate some people. I won't talk about the music score.

SimonNZ

#36358
Quote from: 71 dB on February 13, 2024, 05:12:15 AMIt is interesting how differently we experience movie. A really entertaining movie to some people can be a borefest to some other people... each to their own. That is why I don't recommend movies to anyone and almost never take recommentions from other people. What's the point when tastes differ so much?

Because there are many, many more criteria to judge a film on than whether it is "entertaining" or "boring". In fact you'd need to turn off your entire critical apparatus to only see a film - or any work of art - as only on that one continuum.

Also: a review doesn't need to contain a recommendation or a warning. A "recommendation" is what I can choose to take from the analysis.

Roasted Swan

I saw Poor Things at my £4 a ticket local cinema last night;



and I must admit I found it really rather wonderful on many levels.  How refreshing to seeing a film not mired in either "gritty realism" or cgi-generated fantasy.  Of course there is a lot of cgi-driven visual weirdness but the whole look of this film is quite unique.  A Terry-Gilliam-like visual richness and wit that makes me want to see it again because of all the details in design (costumes and set) I will have missed.  Of course the many will focus on the uninhibited sex in the film but again I thought this was treated with humour rather than anything else.  Emma Stone is a kind of Polly-Anna meets Frankenstein with a default setting of optimism (some would say naivety) for a better future that is funny and charming.  Her performance throughout is again wonderful.  Ruffalo is hilarious - I even like the bizarre accents he and Defoe use which again are some kind of heightened parody.  The script is genuinely funny and the score again weird quite unique but utterly appropriate.  This is certainly a film I can imagine buying on Blu-Ray just to savour so much of the background detail I've missed.  I was hoping I would enjoy this, was not sure I would but was so pleased it was as strikingly individual as it was....