Last Movie You Watched

Started by Drasko, April 06, 2007, 07:51:03 AM

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Cato

One of the best movies in our collection:


The Spitfire Grill

A young woman hit by tragedies throughout her childhood and into early adulthood tries to find a new life in a small town in Maine.

It has one of the finest speeches you will hear in any movie: delivered by Will Patton toward the end.


Music by James Horner, with help from Gustav Mahler's Second and Third Symphonies!





Highly recommended!
"Meet Miss Ruth Sherwood, from Columbus, Ohio, the Middle of the Universe!"

- Brian Aherne introducing Rosalind Russell in  My Sister Eileen (1942)

Cato

Quote from: Cato on July 09, 2024, 03:44:20 PMOne of the best movies in our collection:


The Spitfire Grill

A young woman hit by tragedies throughout her childhood and into early adulthood tries to find a new life in a small town in Maine.

It has one of the finest speeches you will hear in any movie: delivered by Will Patton toward the end.


Music by James Horner, with help from Gustav Mahler's Second and Third Symphonies!





Highly recommended!


The actress at the center of the movie is Alison Elliott, who should have gotten a Best Actress award and become better known, but...
"Meet Miss Ruth Sherwood, from Columbus, Ohio, the Middle of the Universe!"

- Brian Aherne introducing Rosalind Russell in  My Sister Eileen (1942)

Cato

#37082
A 1935 comedy with Katharine Hepburn, Cary Grant, Edmund Gwenn, and Brian Aherne.




Katharine Hepburn pretends to be a man, Cary Grant has a Cockney accent, and comic chaos ensues most of the time.

A good number of jokes, of course, come from Hepburn's role as a fake man.  Probably in 1935 one would have viewed the movie as giddily edgy.  ;D

There are some good lines:

Hepburn to Cary Grant: "You've got the mind of a pig!"

He: "It's a pig's world!"   ;)
"Meet Miss Ruth Sherwood, from Columbus, Ohio, the Middle of the Universe!"

- Brian Aherne introducing Rosalind Russell in  My Sister Eileen (1942)

NumberSix

Doc (1971)

Stacy Keach plays Doc Holliday, and Faye Dunaway is his love interest. I saw this one mentioned in Tarantino's book amongst other early 70s cynical films. In this one, Wyatt Earp as described by Tarantino is a fascist murderer instead of a hero. I have to agree. He's thoroughly unlikable.

The film is a bit slow moving at times, but it doesn't pull any punches philosophically. Dunaway is a powerhouse actress, and I adore her. But this is not her best work. I don't feel like she and Keach sparkled strongly.

One other thought:

Everything I know about Wyatt Earp comes from Tombstone (well, and John Ford and Henry Fonda). A number of little details in this film made me think that the makers of Tombstone studied it. For instance, the way Morgan Earp says "brother" several times is very similar to the way Bill Paxton says it. And this Wyatt Earp several times knocks down a bad guy using the butt of his pistol, which is something Kurt Russell also does.

Dry Brett Kavanaugh

Quote from: NumberSix on July 11, 2024, 07:52:23 AMDoc (1971)

Stacy Keach plays Doc Holliday, and Faye Dunaway is his love interest. I saw this one mentioned in Tarantino's book amongst other early 70s cynical films. In this one, Wyatt Earp as described by Tarantino is a fascist murderer instead of a hero. I have to agree. He's thoroughly unlikable.

The film is a bit slow moving at times, but it doesn't pull any punches philosophically. Dunaway is a powerhouse actress, and I adore her. But this is not her best work. I don't feel like she and Keach sparkled strongly.

One other thought:

Everything I know about Wyatt Earp comes from Tombstone (well, and John Ford and Henry Fonda). A number of little details in this film made me think that the makers of Tombstone studied it. For instance, the way Morgan Earp says "brother" several times is very similar to the way Bill Paxton says it. And this Wyatt Earp several times knocks down a bad guy using the butt of his pistol, which is something Kurt Russell also does.



I saw the movie when I was a kid, and I was not impressed. I must revisit the movie as Doc Holliday is my favorite hero. Tombstone is a fine movie.

brewski

#37085
After seeing the "Black and Chrome" version of Mad Max: Fury Road, I think I'm ready to commit to "favorite action movie of all time." (Other contenders: Aliens, Terminator II, The Fugitive, some of the Bond films, and perhaps some in the Mission: Impossible series.)

I do want to see the color version at some point. But here is the sandstorm sequence from the black-and-white print, which is just a knockout piece of filmmaking.


-Bruce
"I set down a beautiful chord on paper—and suddenly it rusts."
—Alfred Schnittke (1934-1998)

DavidW

Quote from: brewski on Today at 09:35:05 AMAfter seeing the "Black and Chrome" version of Mad Max: Fury Road, I think I'm ready to commit to "favorite action movie of all time." (Other contenders: Aliens, Terminator II, The Fugitive, some of the Bond films, and perhaps some in the Mission: Impossible series.)

I do want to see the color version at some point. But here is the sandstorm sequence from the black-and-white print, which is just a knockout piece of filmmaking.


-Bruce

"What a day!  What a lovely day!"
"WITNESS!  WITNESS ME!!"
"I live!  I die!  I live again!"

I love that movie. 8)

DavidW

I rewatched Robocop.  It was spot on the prediction for Detroit, and not far off for over-commericalization.  I especially liked the ad for a name-brand heart replacement. "And remember, we care."  It is such a funny movie.



I want a car with shitty gas mileage!



I'd buy that for a dollar!






brewski

Quote from: DavidW on Today at 11:17:15 AM"What a day!  What a lovely day!"
"WITNESS!  WITNESS ME!!"
"I live!  I die!  I live again!"

I love that movie. 8)

;D (To the quotes)

Just saw it a couple of years ago, late in the game. The previous Mad Max films were (and are) excellent, but this one raised the bar considerably. I remember at the 2016 Oscars, it was nominated for a ton of awards, but Spotlight won Best Picture — haven't seen that one yet. But it's hard for me to imagine a more bravura bit of filmmaking than this one.

-Bruce
"I set down a beautiful chord on paper—and suddenly it rusts."
—Alfred Schnittke (1934-1998)

Karl Henning

Quote from: DavidW on Today at 11:24:32 AMI rewatched Robocop.  It was spot on the prediction for Detroit, and not far off for over-commericalization.  I especially liked the ad for a name-brand heart replacement. "And remember, we care."  It is such a funny movie.



I want a car with shitty gas mileage!



I'd buy that for a dollar!






Of all the things which the remake did not refresh, that irreverent sense of humor is what I miss most.
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot