Last Movie You Watched

Started by Drasko, April 06, 2007, 07:51:03 AM

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brewski

Quote from: SimonNZ on June 20, 2024, 06:07:35 PMAlmost totally.

Did you miss it? Its easy to miss.

Thank you so much for mentioning this. I definitely missed it, but after searching for the scene (and comments on it), I found it and replayed it several times. Without giving away anything to those who haven't seen it, the shot is quite dark, at least on the print I saw. Perhaps on the big screen, in a darkened theater, it would have been more visible, and I hope to test that out some day e.g., seeing it at the Museum of Modern Art, or somewhere similar. It took those several replays to even detect the movement.

But to paraphrase what one writer said, the moment is like an earthquake.

Anyway, an incredibly subtle effect, and again, thank you for calling my attention to it. Makes it an even more interesting film, as if it weren't striking enough.

-Bruce
"I set down a beautiful chord on paper—and suddenly it rusts."
—Alfred Schnittke (1934-1998)

Karl Henning

Ernest Hemingway's The Killers and On Her Majesty's Secret Service
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Karl Henning

Quote from: Karl Henning on June 21, 2024, 07:16:36 PMErnest Hemingway's The Killers and On Her Majesty's Secret Service.
Well, and shame on me for not noting earlier that Satchmo sings "We've All the Time in the World."
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

SimonNZ

Quote from: brewski on June 21, 2024, 10:33:15 AMThank you so much for mentioning this. I definitely missed it, but after searching for the scene (and comments on it), I found it and replayed it several times. Without giving away anything to those who haven't seen it, the shot is quite dark, at least on the print I saw. Perhaps on the big screen, in a darkened theater, it would have been more visible, and I hope to test that out some day e.g., seeing it at the Museum of Modern Art, or somewhere similar. It took those several replays to even detect the movement.

But to paraphrase what one writer said, the moment is like an earthquake.

Anyway, an incredibly subtle effect, and again, thank you for calling my attention to it. Makes it an even more interesting film, as if it weren't striking enough.

-Bruce

I hadn't seen La Jetee in maybe 20 years, so I went to the dvd rental place and watched it again.

That bit is still pretty dark, but maybe a notch better than that Youtube upload.


Thinking about great short films I also found this interesting list:

https://www.filmsfatale.com/blog/2021/7/5/the-best-100-short-films-of-all-time

La Jetee is no.4. I guessed that Maya Deren's "Meshes Of The Afternoon" would be no.1 and guessed right. I rented that as well and will watch it later, having also not seen it in some 20 years.

brewski

Quote from: SimonNZ on June 22, 2024, 01:13:27 AMI hadn't seen La Jetee in maybe 20 years, so I went to the dvd rental place and watched it again.

That bit is still pretty dark, but maybe a notch better than that Youtube upload.


Thinking about great short films I also found this interesting list:

https://www.filmsfatale.com/blog/2021/7/5/the-best-100-short-films-of-all-time

La Jetee is no.4. I guessed that Maya Deren's "Meshes Of The Afternoon" would be no.1 and guessed right. I rented that as well and will watch it later, having also not seen it in some 20 years.

PS, the YouTube link disappeared shortly after my first viewing ( :o Did I trigger something?) but I found it on Vimeo, here.

And thanks for that most interesting list. I was surprised that I've seen maybe a dozen of them, and further, the list reminded me of some directors I'd forgotten about, or hadn't seen in ages, e.g., Norman McLaren, when decades ago, I went through a big National Film Board of Canada phase.

Have never seen the Maya Deren film, so adding it to the "ASAP" queue.

-Bruce
"I set down a beautiful chord on paper—and suddenly it rusts."
—Alfred Schnittke (1934-1998)

SonicMan46

Quote from: Karl Henning on June 21, 2024, 07:16:36 PMErnest Hemingway's The Killers and On Her Majesty's Secret Service.
The Killers (1946) - boy, the young Ava & Burt never looked better!  Dave :)

 

Karl Henning

Probably only my secong viewing: Spartacus. Magnificent and touching.
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Dry Brett Kavanaugh

Chaplin - Robert Downey Jr. et al..  Nice music and cinematography. Wish the movie were in a wide screen format.






Karl Henning

And, revisiting a classic: The Third Man.
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Karl Henning

Quote from: Karl Henning on June 23, 2024, 06:42:37 PMAnd, revisiting a classic: The Third Man.
Holly's repeating the doctor's name with an English "w" is peculiar, since he knows the name not by having read it, but having heard it.
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Karl Henning

Quote from: Karl Henning on June 23, 2024, 06:42:37 PMAnd, revisiting a classic: The Third Man.
So predictably hapless of Holly. Did he really think Anna would do otherwise than walk on past him?
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

DavidW

I rewatched Nosferatu (the 70s one).  Last time I watched it was on ep mode vhs on a 15 inch crt!  Now I streamed it in hd on a 77 inch oled.  It felt like I had gone back in time to watch it in the theater.  Anyway it is a great movie, it plays with the audience's expectations of where it should go and instead takes some different directions.  Beautiful cinematography as well.



I look forward to the new one this December, but Herzog knocked this remake out of the park.

Karl Henning

Quote from: DavidW on June 25, 2024, 09:13:39 AMI rewatched Nosferatu (the 70s one).  Last time I watched it was on ep mode vhs on a 15 inch crt!  Now I streamed it in hd on a 77 inch oled.  It felt like I had gone back in time to watch it in the theater.  Anyway it is a great movie, it plays with the audience's expectations of where it should go and instead takes some different directions.  Beautiful cinematography as well.



I look forward to the new one this December, but Herzog knocked this remake out of the park.
Kind of a philosophical question. If a film has been remade well, is another remake necessary?
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

DavidW

Quote from: Karl Henning on June 25, 2024, 09:18:03 AMKind of a philosophical question. If a film has been remade well, is another remake necessary?

Yes, for both the remake and the reremake if the director or producer has their own unique vision, there is definitely space for all of them.  And for this film, the remakes are separated by so many decades that it is really a chance for a completely different generation to put their own stamp on it.

Karl Henning

Quote from: DavidW on June 25, 2024, 09:26:31 AMYes, for both the remake and the reremake if the director or producer has their own unique vision, there is definitely space for all of them.  And for this film, the remakes are separated by so many decades that it is really a chance for a completely different generation to put their own stamp on it.
Very good. And after all, there have been a number of films of Hamlet, no two of them the same, and a number of them excellent.
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

SonicMan46

Hidden Figures (2016) - synopsis and cast below; a biodrama and a fav for us to watch - more about the real 'computers', as they were called HERE.  Dave :)

QuoteHidden Figures is a 2016 American biographical drama film directed by Theodore Melfi and written by Melfi and Allison Schroeder. It is loosely based on the 2016 non-fiction book of the same name by Margot Lee Shetterly about three female African-American mathematicians: Katherine Goble Johnson (Taraji P. Henson), Dorothy Vaughan (Octavia Spencer), and Mary Jackson (Janelle Monáe), who worked at NASA during the Space Race. Other stars include Kevin Costner, Kirsten Dunst, Jim Parsons, Mahershala Ali, Aldis Hodge, and Glen Powell. (Source)

 


Karl Henning

Quote from: Karl Henning on June 25, 2024, 10:41:04 AMI'm getting to this late.


As is apt to happen, I watch Cassie's reaction to a movie I like, and as a result, I'm ready to return to the Ur-text.

So, it's The Green Mile tonight.
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Cato

Quote from: Karl Henning on June 25, 2024, 04:50:35 PMAs is apt to happen, I watch Cassie's reaction to a movie I like, and as a result, I'm ready to return to the Ur-text.

So, it's The Green Mile tonight.


I believe this is another example of Alfred Hitchcock's idea that great movies can be based upon short stories and expanded/improved.


A really wonderful movie, which has a documentary feel to it at times:



It deals with a demoralized part of the U.S. Army Air Force based in England c. 1942 and trying to damage the Nazi war effort through daytime bombing of military targets.

A new tough commander (Gregory Peck) is brought in to change the situation: perfect performances from Dean Jagger, Millard Mitchell, and a host of others, but especially from Hugh Marlowe, whose character evolves throughout the movie.

20th Century Fox had Hugh Marlowe under contract for a long time, but he was usually billed second or lower, and never made it really big.  Occasionally he had top billing in "B-movies" e.g. science-fiction thrillers or Westerns.

Alfred Hitchcock apparently liked him for his T.V. show: he was in 6 episodes!   
"Meet Miss Ruth Sherwood, from Columbus, Ohio, the Middle of the Universe!"

- Brian Aherne introducing Rosalind Russell in  My Sister Eileen (1942)

Cato

Quote from: Cato on June 25, 2024, 05:25:40 PMI believe this is another example of Alfred Hitchcock's idea that great movies can be based upon short stories and expanded/improved.


A really wonderful movie, which has a documentary feel to it at times:



It deals with a demoralized part of the U.S. Army Air Force based in England c. 1942 and trying to damage the Nazi war effort through daytime bombing of military targets.

A new tough commander (Gregory Peck) is brought in to change the situation: perfect performances from Dean Jagger, Millard Mitchell, and a host of others, but especially from Hugh Marlowe, whose character evolves throughout the movie.

20th Century Fox had Hugh Marlowe under contract for a long time, but he was usually billed second or lower, and never made it really big.  Occasionally he had top billing in "B-movies" e.g. science-fiction thrillers or Westerns.

Alfred Hitchcock apparently liked him for his T.V. show: he was in 6 episodes! 
 

Concerning Twelve O'Clock High, I should mention that Dean Jagger received an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor for his performance.

Watch and judge for yourselves!  ;)
"Meet Miss Ruth Sherwood, from Columbus, Ohio, the Middle of the Universe!"

- Brian Aherne introducing Rosalind Russell in  My Sister Eileen (1942)

drogulus


     Hugh Marlowe vs. a flying saucer.


     
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