Discovering the Baroque

Started by chrisinsuffolk, June 14, 2024, 01:09:47 PM

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atardecer

Quote from: Florestan on June 23, 2024, 10:14:29 AMNorthern German Baroque sucks. Vivaldi over Bach for me. ;D

Well, Bach was aware of and integrated the Baroque styles from the various regions into his music, including the music of Vivaldi.

András Schiff suggested Bach is the greatest European of all time, and his picture should be on the flag of the European Union, because he did something politicians fail at by successfully unifying all of these different countries into his style.
"Science has explained nothing; the more we know the more fantastic the world becomes and the profounder the surrounding darkness." - Aldous Huxley

"Specialized meaninglessness has come to be regarded, in certain circles, as a kind of hallmark of true science." - Aldous Huxley

Florestan

Quote from: atardecer on June 24, 2024, 08:30:48 PMWell, Bach was aware of and integrated the Baroque styles from the various regions into his music, including the music of Vivaldi.

András Schiff suggested Bach is the greatest European of all time, and his picture should be on the flag of the European Union, because he did something politicians fail at by successfully unifying all of these different countries into his style.

Sounds more like Telemann than Bach to me...  ;D
When I'm creating at the piano, I tend to feel happy; but - the eternal dilemma - how can we be happy amid the unhappiness of others? I'd do everything I could to give everyone a moment of happiness. That's what's at the heart of my music. — Nino Rota

Jo498

It's more true of Telemann, yes.
It's to an extent also true of Handel, who probably wrote more that is "pure italian" than the other two but whose lateish famous works are also a fusion. And this also applies to most less known German composers because there was no "German" instrumental style (except for organ music maybe), so they all had to somewhat adopt (mostly) Italian and (some) French influences.

The central thing about Bach is that he wrote more than anyone else at his time in a way compatible with what later ages thought of as great music, i.e. everything as thoroughly "worked out" as possible.

This was against the practice of the time, especially in opera, where even someone like Handel who was very flexible and pragmatic sometimes got into trouble with his singers because he didn't leave them all the liberties they were accustomed to.
Tout le malheur des hommes vient d'une seule chose, qui est de ne savoir pas demeurer en repos, dans une chambre.
- Blaise Pascal

atardecer

I hear Vivaldi influence in some of Bach's music, especially some of the concertos. I'm not aware of any Telemann pieces that sound like that style of Italian Baroque (or Handel for that matter), though there is a lot of Telemann I haven't listened to, he composed a lot of works.
"Science has explained nothing; the more we know the more fantastic the world becomes and the profounder the surrounding darkness." - Aldous Huxley

"Specialized meaninglessness has come to be regarded, in certain circles, as a kind of hallmark of true science." - Aldous Huxley

71 dB

Quote from: Florestan on June 23, 2024, 10:14:29 AMItalian/Italianate, French and Austrian Baroque rocks, Northern German Baroque sucks. Vivaldi over Bach for me. ;D

Your opinion sucks.  :D There is hardly any baroque music that sucks. I enjoy all of it. Some more than some other, but I like all of it. Nothing of it sucks to me.
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chrisinsuffolk

#26
Quote from: nethanpaul86 on June 25, 2024, 11:59:43 AMThis is a fantastic selection of Baroque music! It's clear you've put a lot of thought and listening into curating this playlist.  From the iconic Brandenburg Concertos by Bach to the dramatic Monteverdi madrigal, you've captured the range and beauty of the Baroque era.

If you're interested in further exploration, some listeners who enjoy Bach also gravitate towards other Baroque composers like Handel (known for Messiah and Water Music) or Vivaldi (famous for The Four Seasons).  Also, within Bach's cantatas, there are many hidden gems –  perhaps you could share which ones resonated most with you on this playlist?

Thanks for your kind comments. Yes I have invested many hundreds of hours into this list and I have reviewed it meticulously several times through so it flows from piece to piece.

I must say the first few hours of the playlist are really magical for me and I start my working day listening to this section more often that not. As to my favourite Cantata recordings, I especially enjoy conductors such as Rifkin who's arrangements are more sparse in nature, I like to hear individual voicings. And as to my favourite Bach recording this is probably Bach's Magnificat by Coro della Radio Svizzera, WOW!

The Bach includes on this playlist are around 3/5 complete from a review of his entire oeuvre.  I made a Complete Bach playlist with the cantatas in liturgical order which I have used as a source for this playlist, so the later (numbered) cantatas are yet to be included (as I have reviewed and extracted up to around track 2220 out of the 3422 tracks). I intend to tackle the remainder perhaps next year. This explains why the playlist is so Bach heavy. Everything takes time as in the Baroque Meditation playlist I have tried to create themes with groups of recordings.

At some point I do want to comprehensively review Handel and Vivaldi amongst other composers including Buxtehude to incorporate into this list, but this will no doubt take several years!

By the way I found the Bach cantatas website useful for discussions on the best recordings as a start point and now I can see GMG is another great resource with its erudite contributors!