Author Topic: György Kurtág (b. 1926)  (Read 30600 times)

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Offline Joaquimhock

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Re: György Kurtág (b. 1926)
« Reply #100 on: November 16, 2018, 02:15:37 AM »
I was only able to listen to the first hour and the last 15 minutes properly. Do you know if there is a podcast somewhere? I find nothing on RAI 3...

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Offline Joaquimhock

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Re: György Kurtág (b. 1926)
« Reply #101 on: November 16, 2018, 05:18:53 AM »
I found it on radio bartok. But no idea for how long it will be online...  https://www.mediaklikk.hu/radio-lejatszo-bartok/?date=2018-11-15_19-35-00&enddate=2018-11-15_22-09-00&ch=mr3#
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Online Mandryka

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Re: György Kurtág (b. 1926)
« Reply #102 on: November 17, 2018, 08:05:39 AM »
I found it on radio bartok. But no idea for how long it will be online...  https://www.mediaklikk.hu/radio-lejatszo-bartok/?date=2018-11-15_19-35-00&enddate=2018-11-15_22-09-00&ch=mr3#

Good thank you. From about 20:09:00
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Offline Brewski

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Happy Birthday, Kurtág!
« Reply #103 on: February 19, 2019, 06:45:48 AM »
Happy Birthday to György Kurtág, who turns 93 today.

One of the greats, he wrote his first opera last year, 'Fin de partie,' based on Beckett's 'Endgame.'

--Bruce
"Do you realize that we're meteorites; almost as soon as we're born, we have to disappear?"

~Iannis Xenakis

Twitter: @BruceHodgesNY

Offline schnittkease

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Re: Happy Birthday, Kurtág!
« Reply #104 on: February 19, 2019, 07:02:46 PM »
Happy Birthday to György Kurtág, who turns 93 today.

One of the greats, he wrote his first opera last year, 'Fin de partie,' based on Beckett's 'Endgame.'

--Bruce

Long live!

Offline vers la flamme

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Re: György Kurtág (b. 1926)
« Reply #105 on: September 15, 2019, 09:24:55 AM »
I'm new to his music, but it's recently occurred to me that Kurtág is one hell of a composer! I have this disc:



... & it's great... especially the song cycle Messages of the Late Miss R.V. Troussova, op.17, and my personal favorite from the disc, ...quasi una fantasia..., op.27/1, surely an homage to Beethoven's op.27 "Quasi fantasia" sonatas.

Any fans of Kurtág's music lately? I think he reminds me something of Anton Webern, a favorite of mine, but... very different. Another touchstone would be Lutoslawski. But I find Kurtág's music to be truly unique. Definitely one of the greatest living composers, no...?

Another question I have: can anyone tell me whether or not Kurtág's music employs so-called serial techniques? I ask because some of his music shares similarities with the prototypically serialist late music of Webern, but for the most part, I am more so reminded of Webern's pre-serial, expressionistic works.
« Last Edit: September 15, 2019, 09:32:42 AM by vers la flamme »

Offline CRCulver

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Re: György Kurtág (b. 1926)
« Reply #106 on: September 22, 2019, 12:31:44 PM »
Another question I have: can anyone tell me whether or not Kurtág's music employs so-called serial techniques? I ask because some of his music shares similarities with the prototypically serialist late music of Webern, but for the most part, I am more so reminded of Webern's pre-serial, expressionistic works.

Kurtág’s first several opus numbers are fairly conventionally serialist. There is an ample literature analyzing these works.

Offline not edward

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Re: György Kurtág (b. 1926)
« Reply #107 on: March 28, 2020, 07:30:58 AM »
Exciting news: Kurtag's operatic version of Beckett's Fin de Partie is now free to watch from RAI for the next month:

Link: https://www.raiplay.it/programmi/findepartie
"I don't at all mind actively disliking a piece of contemporary music, but in order to feel happy about it I must consciously understand why I dislike it. Otherwise it remains in my mind as unfinished business."
 -- Aaron Copland, The Pleasures of Music

Offline vers la flamme

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Re: György Kurtág (b. 1926)
« Reply #108 on: March 28, 2020, 07:41:22 AM »
Exciting news: Kurtag's operatic version of Beckett's Fin de Partie is now free to watch from RAI for the next month:

Link: https://www.raiplay.it/programmi/findepartie

Thanks!

I've been meaning to get more into Kurtág. I keep coming close to pulling the trigger on the Reinbert de Leeuw Kurtág set on ECM, but backing out at the last minute and buying something else instead. Quick, someone talk me into buying it. :D

Offline not edward

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Re: György Kurtág (b. 1926)
« Reply #109 on: March 28, 2020, 07:47:19 AM »
Thanks!

I've been meaning to get more into Kurtág. I keep coming close to pulling the trigger on the Reinbert de Leeuw Kurtág set on ECM, but backing out at the last minute and buying something else instead. Quick, someone talk me into buying it. :D
Buy it. It's a really good summary of his career. PS: the Hungaroton recordings of the song cycles are amazing, too.
"I don't at all mind actively disliking a piece of contemporary music, but in order to feel happy about it I must consciously understand why I dislike it. Otherwise it remains in my mind as unfinished business."
 -- Aaron Copland, The Pleasures of Music

Offline oboe1

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Re: György Kurtág (b. 1926)
« Reply #110 on: August 16, 2020, 09:09:40 PM »
Soon I will be doing an online lecture/recital on Kurtag's solo music for oboe/English horn, music which has only been recently published although it was privately circulated for several decades.  One of the most memorable pieces is "Rozsnyai Ilona in memorium" for English horn and contrabass clarinet.  In all of my research I have been able to find material on the other works to be presented, but can find nothing as to who Rozsnyai Ilona was.  Any information out there?  The piece was written in 1997 so it cannot be referring to someone I see on more recent YouTube videos.  Any help is appreciated.

Offline not edward

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Re: György Kurtág (b. 1926)
« Reply #111 on: February 19, 2021, 05:24:20 AM »
Some free Kurtag concerts online courtesy of the Budapest Music Centre: they're at 7:30 local time / 6:30 GMT / 1:30 EST.

https://bmc.hu/en/news/kurtag-95

Unfortunately it seems that the stream from yesterday's concert is no longer available.

BMC has also released a new recording of the concerto for soprano and piano Sayings of Péter Bornemisza with Tony Arnold and Gábor Csalog.
"I don't at all mind actively disliking a piece of contemporary music, but in order to feel happy about it I must consciously understand why I dislike it. Otherwise it remains in my mind as unfinished business."
 -- Aaron Copland, The Pleasures of Music

Offline Brewski

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Re: György Kurtág (b. 1926)
« Reply #112 on: February 19, 2021, 09:30:34 AM »
Some free Kurtag concerts online courtesy of the Budapest Music Centre: they're at 7:30 local time / 6:30 GMT / 1:30 EST.

https://bmc.hu/en/news/kurtag-95

Unfortunately it seems that the stream from yesterday's concert is no longer available.

BMC has also released a new recording of the concerto for soprano and piano Sayings of Péter Bornemisza with Tony Arnold and Gábor Csalog.

Thanks so much, edward!

--Bruce
"Do you realize that we're meteorites; almost as soon as we're born, we have to disappear?"

~Iannis Xenakis

Twitter: @BruceHodgesNY

Offline CRCulver

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Re: György Kurtág (b. 1926)
« Reply #113 on: February 20, 2021, 02:25:11 AM »
BMC has also released a new recording of the concerto for soprano and piano Sayings of Péter Bornemisza with Tony Arnold and Gábor Csalog.

It would be interesting to know what Kurtág thinks of this. The story of the original Hungaroton recording of The Sayings of Péter Bornemisza is infamous: Kurtág kept rejecting take after take, because the performers couldn’t get exactly what he wanted in spite of endless rehearsal and Kurtág’s elaborate verbal instructions on how to "get behind the score". After forty-odd takes, they just gave up and released one of the takes they already had.

Online Mandryka

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Re: György Kurtág (b. 1926)
« Reply #114 on: February 20, 2021, 02:51:56 AM »
It would be interesting to know what Kurtág thinks of this. The story of the original Hungaroton recording of The Sayings of Péter Bornemisza is infamous: Kurtág kept rejecting take after take, because the performers couldn’t get exactly what he wanted in spite of endless rehearsal and Kurtág’s elaborate verbal instructions on how to "get behind the score". After forty-odd takes, they just gave up and released one of the takes they already had.

Quote
Preparations for the Budapest commemoration concert for the Reformation 500, given on 19 December 2017 in the Music Academy, began two years earlier. Finding the singer for Bornemisza proved to be the most difficult task. A good few excellent singers rejected the piece, notorious for its murderously difficult vocal part, and others were vetoed by the composer. Tony Arnold, who had already proved her affinity
for the composer with her performances of Kurtág’s Op. 17, Messages of the Late R. V. Troussova, took on the challenge. Grappling with the Hungarian-language proved to be the easiest thing for her. The real challenge was mastering the astonishingly difficult, dodecaphonic voice part, with its extremes of register, and dramatic outbursts, all at the white heat of expression that Kurtág demanded. Most of the rehearsals took place in Budapest, with Kurtág. The composer’s wife Márta monitored the heroic undertakings throughout, constantly reproaching Kurtág for the devilishly difficult things he had set down on paper. At one dramatic moment Tony broke down in tears. “Here I am, fifty years old, I thought I knew all there was to know about singing, and it turns out I know nothing.” Then the Kurtág couple embraced her. This may well have been the turning point in the rehearsal process. Gábor Csalog had already played the equally “unlearnable” piano part several times. During rehearsals he stood his ground as a pianist, assistant, mediator, and if necessary, psychologist. Whoever has studied with Kurtág has some idea of his demands for uncompromising music-making – for the musicians to give their entire being. To paraphrase the text of a Hungarian folksong: “if you want to be [Kurtág’s] piper, you have to go through hell.” Perhaps it is no exaggeration if, in the case of The Sayings of Péter Bornemisza, this “hell” is the most frightening and hopeless of places. Eventually though, the story of this passionate work of several years was crowned with resurrection: the work was born into new life, in a “valid” performance.

https://static.qobuz.com/goodies/94/000139949.pdf
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