Author Topic: Buxtehude's Building of Bricks  (Read 4898 times)

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Offline aukhawk

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Re: Buxtehude's Building of Bricks
« Reply #20 on: April 02, 2020, 03:55:01 AM »
I've been listening to some of the harpsichord music, by the talented Lars Ulrik Mortensen. A very inventive composer, he must have been a brilliant keyboardist... what's the story about how Bach walked 400km from Arnstadt to Lübeck to see Buxtehude (who was by then nearing the end of his life) play the organ...? Not hard to tell why!

What are some highlights among his vocal music? There's a few discs of his chamber music that I'm also interested in...

... And of course this wonderful record has been discussed elsewhere, it would be my 'Record of the Year 2019' were it not for the fact it was released very late in 2018.


Buxtehude : Abendmusiken : Vox Luminis

This is a mix of Cantatas and Trio Sonatas, mainly.  It could conceivably represent a sort of evening concert as encountered by the young JS Bach when he walked to Lubeck.
Although this is a wonderful recording the Trio Sonatas are played rather plainly, those on Naxos featuring John Holloway are for example a more interesting listen, or that La Rêveuse collection upthread.
« Last Edit: April 02, 2020, 03:57:26 AM by aukhawk »

Offline Scion7

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Re: Buxtehude's Building of Bricks
« Reply #21 on: March 04, 2021, 09:24:55 PM »
Denmark's Dietrich Buxtehude (ca. 1637-1707) wrote a number of trio sonatas and keyboard works,  and his cantatas are fine pieces of music.  This one has been on rotation frequently this week on the stereo:
 
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Offline 71 dB

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Re: Buxtehude's Building of Bricks
« Reply #22 on: March 05, 2021, 02:59:29 AM »
Denmark's Dietrich Buxtehude (ca. 1637-1707) wrote a number of trio sonatas and keyboard works,  and his cantatas are fine pieces of music.  This one has been on rotation frequently this week on the stereo:
 


I have the re-issued twofer (RIC 252) where this is disc one.  $:)

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Online SonicMan46

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Re: Buxtehude's Building of Bricks
« Reply #23 on: June 30, 2021, 06:37:29 AM »
Yesterday, I left the post at the bottom in the listening thread which was quickly buried by four or five pages w/o a response - this thread has been around a while but with not much input - SO, hopefully a refreshed start.  My post was directed at his Chamber Works and Harpsichord Output; of course he wrote a LOT of Organ Music (I have the 7-disc set on MDG w/ Harald Vogel HERE); he also wrote a LOT of vocal music, but my collection in that genre includes only two Cantata CDs.

The first quote below is a short bio - actually he was Danish; his last post for nearly 40 years was in Lübeck, where he was visited by younger to become well known composers, such as Handel and Bach (see second quote).  A not uncommon practice then was for a man marry the daughter of his predecessor in his occupation, which Buxtehude did - but when he was to retire, Handel and Mattheson were considered possible replacements w/ the stipulation that the one getting the position had to marry Buxtehude's oldest daughter, which both refused (don't know the details, e.g. age, appearance, personality, etc.?); and the famous walk of JS Bach (see quote 2 for more and check link, if interested).  Dave :)

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Dieterich Buxtehude (c.1637–1707) was a Danish organist and composer of the Baroque period, whose works for the organ represent a central part of the standard organ repertoire usually performed at recitals and church services. As a composer who worked in various vocal and instrumental idioms, Buxtehude's style greatly influenced other composers, such as  Johann Sebastian Bach. Historically, Buxtehude is among the important composers of the mid-Baroque period in Germany. (Source)

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In 1703, Handel and Mattheson both traveled to meet Buxtehude, who was by then elderly and ready to retire. He offered his position in Lübeck to Handel and Mattheson but stipulated that the organist who ascended to it must marry his eldest daughter, Anna Margareta. Both Handel and Mattheson turned the offer down and left the day after their arrival.[3] In 1705, J.S. Bach, then a young man of twenty, walked from Arnstadt to Lübeck, a distance of more than 400 kilometres (250 mi) (Source)


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Well, I decided to spend the next few days or so on Dietrich Buxtehude (c.1637-1707), primarily his chamber works and harpsichord music - and yes, in 1705, J.S. Bach, then only 20 y/o, walked from Arnstadt to Lübeck, a distance of more than 250 mi to hear the 'maestro'!

Chamber Music - the top 3 CDs below w/ John Holloway on violin, Jaap ter Linden on viola da gamba, and Lars Ulrik Mortensen on harpsichord - these are works from the 1690s although likely composed earlier - love these recordings; multiple reviews are attached w/ some complaining of the church ambience, others not - does not bother me.

Harpsichord Music - lower three volumes w/ Lars Ulrik Mortensen - the harpsichord sounds wonderful as are the sound recordings - discs to recommend to so-called haters of the instrument, might change their minds (of course, Buxtehude's composing does not hurt).  Now I also own his organ music w/ Harald Vogel on MDG and several Cantata CDs, but for a later time.  Dave :)

   

   

Offline Que

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Re: Buxtehude's Building of Bricks
« Reply #24 on: June 30, 2021, 07:08:17 AM »
Quote
In 1703, Handel and Mattheson both traveled to meet Buxtehude, who was by then elderly and ready to retire. He offered his position in Lübeck to Handel and Mattheson but stipulated that the organist who ascended to it must marry his eldest daughter, Anna Margareta. Both Handel and Mattheson turned the offer down and left the day after their arriva

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Unfortunately, there was a slight problem…Buxtehude’s daughter, Anna Margareta, was exceptionally unattractive, and no matter how prestigious the appointment, none could bear the thought of taking her hand in marriage! And so Dietrich Buxtehude remained organist at St. Mary’s until his death.

The daughter that he had left behind to frighten away aspiring candidates did not languish long. Buxtehude’s old assistant, a certain J.C. Schieferdecker, who is famous for nothing else, wed the daughter, and gained what was known at time as “erhielt den schönen Dienst” (the pretty job)
« Last Edit: June 30, 2021, 07:15:18 AM by Que »

Online SonicMan46

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Re: Buxtehude's Building of Bricks
« Reply #25 on: June 30, 2021, 07:35:13 AM »


Well, 'oldest' or 'youngest' daughter?  Well, here's another DISCUSSION (one paragraph quoted below) - Mathesson would have been in his early 20s, so the daughter in question 30-ish - the Buxtehude's had 7 daughters and Anna Margreta was a 'middle' one, born in 1675, so her age would match the visit of Mathesson - as the attached pic shows, she was a middle daughter (and for the times would not be considered 'in her prime' - times do change! :laugh:).  Dave :)

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In August of 1703, Johann Mathesson came from Hamburg to interview. He was ideal to say the least and wanted the job until he got a look at Buxtehude's daughter Anna Margreta. Unfortunately, he lost interest because she turned out to be too old. Ten years his senior, in fact-apparently thirty was over the hill.
« Last Edit: June 30, 2021, 08:42:12 AM by SonicMan46 »

Offline aligreto

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Re: Buxtehude's Building of Bricks
« Reply #26 on: September 26, 2021, 01:00:48 AM »
Buxtehude: Scandinavian Cantatas [Hillier]





I find this whole presentation to be both exciting and very engaging: the album has a fine presence throughout. The instrumental side of things is very well taken care of here. With regard to the choice of, and appreciation of vocal choices, this is always a very subjective thing but I do enjoy the vocal contributions and balance on this album. I find the Missa alla brevis and Domine salvum fac regem to be particularly engaging works. It is like the best has been left until the end here.
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