Author Topic: Boris Tishchenko (1939 - 2010)  (Read 20703 times)

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Offline Maestro267

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Re: Boris Tishchenko (1939 - 2010)
« Reply #60 on: July 11, 2022, 04:54:22 AM »
It has been put on Spotify now, btw.

Offline relm1

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Re: Boris Tishchenko (1939 - 2010)
« Reply #61 on: August 09, 2022, 02:55:22 PM »
A lightbulb just went off for me as I was listening to Tishchenko's Violin Concerto No. 1 for the first time just now.  First, I really enjoyed it.  I think he was only 19 when he composed it and it was a very fine work.  What I found unexpected was the shadow of Shostakovich doesn't loom so large but rather post-Soviet futurist music, modernism, and expressionism is a larger influence.  I get he's early in his career but I'm familiar with his later works more than his early works so this was a bit revelatory to me.  He's more an heir to Mosolov than to Shostakovich.  But you can clearly see elements of Shostakovich, but I hear this more as elements of modernism that Shostakovich embraced.  Think pre-Pravda Shostakovich of 20's and 30's rather than mid 30's through 50's. 

I believe Soviet 20th century music has a significant musicological and historical place and is very rich in history and substance.  I thought somewhat simplistically that the second half of 20th century soviet music was dominated by Shostakovich and his imitators but that's really not the case, it's far more nuanced and frankly interesting.  One characteristic it seems to share is a nostalgia or longing for tradition even if that means a late 20th century composer like Tishchenko looks back to the Soviet avant-garde because he does so by bringing many other influences some of which are very traditional and some more experimental.  A fascinating composer and I highly recommend both his violin concertos - they are probably my favorite of his works.  They are not at all too far forward (anyone who likes Mosolov's Iron Foundry won't find anything too far in these works) but they are truly deserved to be better known as does this composer.  I regret not appreciating him more when he was alive.

Violin Concerto No. 1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vi_jW4pou4A
Violin Concerto No. 2: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2WVpIubQugw
« Last Edit: August 09, 2022, 02:57:34 PM by relm1 »

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: Boris Tishchenko (1939 - 2010)
« Reply #62 on: August 09, 2022, 03:20:45 PM »
A lightbulb just went off for me as I was listening to Tishchenko's Violin Concerto No. 1 for the first time just now.  First, I really enjoyed it.  I think he was only 19 when he composed it and it was a very fine work.  What I found unexpected was the shadow of Shostakovich doesn't loom so large but rather post-Soviet futurist music, modernism, and expressionism is a larger influence.  I get he's early in his career but I'm familiar with his later works more than his early works so this was a bit revelatory to me.  He's more an heir to Mosolov than to Shostakovich.  But you can clearly see elements of Shostakovich, but I hear this more as elements of modernism that Shostakovich embraced.  Think pre-Pravda Shostakovich of 20's and 30's rather than mid 30's through 50's. 

I believe Soviet 20th century music has a significant musicological and historical place and is very rich in history and substance.  I thought somewhat simplistically that the second half of 20th century soviet music was dominated by Shostakovich and his imitators but that's really not the case, it's far more nuanced and frankly interesting.  One characteristic it seems to share is a nostalgia or longing for tradition even if that means a late 20th century composer like Tishchenko looks back to the Soviet avant-garde because he does so by bringing many other influences some of which are very traditional and some more experimental.  A fascinating composer and I highly recommend both his violin concertos - they are probably my favorite of his works.  They are not at all too far forward (anyone who likes Mosolov's Iron Foundry won't find anything too far in these works) but they are truly deserved to be better known as does this composer.  I regret not appreciating him more when he was alive.

Violin Concerto No. 1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vi_jW4pou4A
Violin Concerto No. 2: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2WVpIubQugw

Nice!
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