Elgar's Hillside

Started by Mark, September 20, 2007, 02:03:01 AM

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JBS

And the response:

Thank you very much for your email. These pictures were sourced from ALAMY.

Do let me know if you have any further questions.
All very best wishes,
Kim

Kim Bourlet
Label and A&R Manager
Signum Records

Hollywood Beach Broadwalk

Roasted Swan

Quote from: JBS on June 17, 2024, 04:27:49 PMI'm currently listening to the new Dream of Gerontius recording from McCreesh and the Gabrieli Players. It seems good, although I'm not sure the "period instruments" make that much of a difference. The organ, which was dubbed in, is that of Hereford Cathedral, and therefore one Elgar directly knew, although only after the composition of DoG. I'm guessing it was used for the 1903 performance of DoG, which took place in Hereford, a year before Elgar moved into the area.

The booklet has some nice photographs of the interior of a wood or forest, but provides no information on the location or the photographer, so I just emailed Signum Records asking for that.

Re the over dubbed organ..... I have no problem with this as a concept although I do prefer "all in one go" recordings - overdubbs do rather reinforce the realsiation that this (any such) "performance" is a synthetic amalgamation of things.  But since such a fuss is made over "Elgar's trombone" and small-bore this and gut string that - surely the Hereford organ will have been changed/re-registered/restored/had new electric blowers and whatever one or more times since 1903 - so its no more an "authentic" instrument than something bought new today.  And also with vocal/choral music there is no way that the singers are singing authentically - even if that was just down to rounded vowels and received pronunciation.  Listen to any old recording of singers and while the actual voices can be wonderful the pronunciation and style of singing does seem very dated - possibly unacceptably so.  In other words we can "accept" the elements of HIP that don't offend our modern sensibilities but ignore those parts that might......

Elgarian Redux

Just returned from two days staying in the hotel at the foot of the British Camp (Herefordshire Beacon) on an Elgar spree. Music listened to during the visit was primarily the 1st Symphony (Boult), the cello concerto (Beatrice Harrison with Elgar conducting), and The Spirit of England (Teresa Cahill & Gibson).

We started off yesterday morning at The Kettle Sings, which is situated on the western slope of the Malvern Hills, and which I've mentioned before in the cycling journal:

 (.

Once more, we drank tea extensively on the terrace. I tentatively suggest that you won't find many places to drink tea with a more Elgarian view.

Elgarian Redux

From there, we climbed up onto the Hills, and walked along the ridge, northwards, with spectacular views of the British Camp behind us.

Elgarian Redux

When the Worcestershire Beacon came into view to the north, discretion prevailed, and we decided that a tactical retreat back to The Kettle Sings was called for (we're not as young as we once were...).

Roasted Swan

Stunning photos of stunning scenery!  Thankyou for sharing.

Luke

Amazing! Looks like a fabulous trip.

Elgarian Redux

[Responding to Luke and Swan]

It doesn't matter how many times we go, or how often, I'm always astonished by the character of the landscape, and the degree to which my response to it is affected by Elgar's music. And conversely, the degree to which my response to the music is affected by long acquaintance with the landscape.

PS. I have an interesting Elgar-related purchase in the works, and will spill the beans in due course.


Luke

Count me intrigued...

Karl Henning

Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

71 dB

Interesting conversation, but I have nothing to contribute myself so I am just lurking...
Spatial distortion is a serious problem deteriorating headphone listening.
Crossfeeders reduce spatial distortion and make the sound more natural
and less tiresome in headphone listening.

My Sound Cloud page <-- NEW Jan. 2024 "Harpeggiator"

Elgarian Redux

#3731
Bean Spillage Revealed!

OK. I should start by explaining that Dora [Penny] Powell's book Edward Elgar. Memories of a Variation is not merely one of my very favourite Elgar books; it's one of my very favourite books. It isn't for everybody. Some folk may find her annoying - I know some folk do. But I don't. If I could invite Elgar to dinner, I would. But if he were not available, I'd ask Dora instead. (Do you know any other young lady Variationee who would have cycled from Wolverhampton to Malvern in the late 1890s?)

I have two copies of her book - a first and third (extended) edition. I've just bought another copy of the third edition. How daft is that? The dust jacket is a bit battered, as you'll see below.

Elgarian Redux

But open the book and you find this (and for a Dorabella fan, this might be thought enough):


Elgarian Redux

But then you turn to the title page and find (Wow!!):

Elgarian Redux

#3734
She was pretty old in 1959 (85 if my maths is right). Dora's maths wasn't so good it seems, because 1959-1898  is 61 years, not 100. But who's counting?

(Does anyone need to see p.111?)

[End of Bean Spillage]

JBS

Quote from: Elgarian Redux on June 22, 2024, 06:24:22 AMShe was pretty old in 1959 (85 if my maths is right). Dora's maths wasn't so good it seems, because 1959-1898  is 61 years, not 100. But who's counting?

(Does anyone need to see p.111?)

[End of Bean Spillage]

Of course we need to see p 111.

Hollywood Beach Broadwalk

Luke

That is absolutely incredible! What a marvel. Gives me shivers just to see it, what a fascinating treasure it must be to find and get your hands on.

Please turn to Pg 111!

Elgarian Redux

By popular demand, here is p.111, rotated through 90 degrees for convenience of looking. (The reason I asked is because it's probably the only known photo of young Dora, and so is very often reproduced.)

Karl Henning

Never before have spilt beans overperformed expectations so magnificently!
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Elgarian Redux

#3739
Oh I do believe there is something interesting unravelling here! Consider this piece of information in the Bulletin of the East Grinstead Society, Spring 1985, recalled by a certain 'B. Desmond':

QuoteOne other outstanding personality was Mrs Dora Powell, who lived in Moat Road. She was a great friend of Sir Edward Elgar who wrote the Enigma Variations that included 'Dorabella' as a tribute to her. I got to know Mrs Powell particularly well when she organised the annual lawn tennis championships held annually on the courts of the East Grinstead Lawn Tennis Club in Ship Street. She used to guide me in taking down day by day the results of many spectacular games that drew players pre-Wimbledon from all parts. She suffered from a stammer, yet when she broadcast from the B.B.C. a fascinating talk on Elgar there was no trace of it. I wrote her a letter expressing my enjoyment. She wrote back expressing her pleasure at receiving it - the first 'fan mail' she had ever received.

Now, I had no idea that Dora lived in East Grinstead after her marriage. However, inserted and lightly stuck into the book between pages 10 and 11 is a photograph of Birchwood Lodge in 1898, supplied by 'Malcolm Powell, Photographer' of 15 High Street, East Grinstead. And Dora, in her Foreword, acknowledges the help of 'Mr Harold Connold of East Grinstead for his 'skilled work in reconditioning old photographs'. That mention of East Grinstead got me digging, and up came the East Grinstead Bulletin ....

So there's an awful lot of East Grinstead in all this, which makes me think that whoever owned this copy of the book lived there, knew Dora, asked her to write in it, and subsequently stuck in the extra Birchwood Lodge photo.

I do not yet know what he or she had for breakfast that day.