Author Topic: Mozart piano sonatas  (Read 148486 times)

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Offline (: premont :)

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Re: Mozart piano sonatas
« Reply #80 on: December 07, 2008, 04:57:17 PM »
I agree, premont.

Lubimov is a rather aristocratic player and his set is complementary with the Badura-Skoda’s one.

I don't like Brautigam playing Mozart, but I have only his set devoted to the variations.

This is a bit strange because I really enjoy the Haydn's works played by Brautigam, especially The Seven Last Words.


What do you think of Brautigams ongoing Beethoven Sonata cycle?

And Bart van Oort´s Mozart cycle?

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Offline Sorin Eushayson

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Re: Mozart piano sonatas
« Reply #81 on: December 07, 2008, 07:43:17 PM »
...Lubimov is a rather aristocratic player and his set is complementary with the Badura-Skoda’s one.

I don't like Brautigam playing Mozart, but I have only his set devoted to the variations...
I have both the Brautigam and Badura-Skoda sets, the latter I just acquired and am thoroughly enjoying.  Brautigam is using a Walter, which is preferable for Mozart in my opinion; Badura-Skoda plays a Streicher, which is a little rougher around the edges.  I'm finding that I'm enjoying Badura-Skoda's work more than Brautigam's, especially with regards to the two fantasias.

Antoine Marchand

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Re: Mozart piano sonatas
« Reply #82 on: December 07, 2008, 10:52:42 PM »
What do you think of Brautigams ongoing Beethoven Sonata cycle?

And Bart van Oort´s Mozart cycle?



In my opinion Bart van Oort is a very fine performer in Mozart; but I have only four or five discs with the variations and the four-hand sonatas (with Ursula Dütschler).

Many times I have decided to order the complete van Oort’s Mozart set, but have changed my mind at the last minute because I own Uchida, Pires (both), Badura-Skoda and Lubimov, and then think: hey, man, stop the madness!

On the other hand, I'm probably a little bit biased against Brautigam and I have not considered his Beethoven as an option: too fast and brutal for me, not my cup of tea.

Although I'm in HIP performances I prefer the  Andras Schiff ongoing sonata cycle, specially after to listen to his lectures on Beethoven piano sonatas:

http://music.guardian.co.uk/classical/page/0,,1943867,00.html

I believe that in Beethoven sonatas there is not yet a definitive period set, although even I have considered these two sets (but without any additional information):

- Badura-Skoda (Gramola, ADD, 69/70, 9 CDs):
http://www.jpc.de/jpcng/classic/detail/-/hnum/6207678?rk=home&rsk=hitlist

- and Bilson with his former students van Oort, Dütschler and others (Claves, DDD, 1996, 10 CDs):
http://www.jpc.de/jpcng/classic/detail/-/hnum/8217873?rk=classic&rsk=hitlist

Do you know some of them?

(probably we should change this conversation to the Beethoven sonatas thread)
« Last Edit: December 08, 2008, 07:01:38 AM by Antoine Marchand »

Offline (: premont :)

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Re: Mozart piano sonatas
« Reply #83 on: December 08, 2008, 06:08:49 AM »
In my opinion Bart van Oort is a very fine performer in Mozart; but I have only four or five discs with the variations and the four-hand sonatas (with Ursula Dütschler).

Many times I have decided to order the complete van Oort’s Mozart set, but have changed my mind at the last minute because I own Uchida, Pires (both), Badura-Skoda and Lubimov, and then think: hey, man, stop the madness!


IIMHO van Oort is lacking a bit in authority compared to Badura-Skoda and Lubimov, and for someone owning the version of both these I do not see any urgent need for the purchase of van Oort´s version of the Sonatas.
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Online Mandryka

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Re: Mozart piano sonatas
« Reply #84 on: January 22, 2009, 08:52:09 AM »
Are there any fans of Glenn Gould's Mozart?

For me his Mozart performances only work sometimes:

  • The K475 Fantasia. No one I've heard gets quite as poetically bleak as Gould does in this piece.
  • K457. Listen to the slow movement and you'll see why I'm so entranced by this performance.
  • K545, the C Major Sonata Facile. It's comedy in music -- a good example of Gould's buffo way with these sonatas.
  • K333. Now that is a real gem -- possibly my favourite sonata performance in the whole set. Every movement is has a revelation -- the way he makes the buffo approach work in the first movement, the way he brings out the left hand melodies in the second, and the extraordinary weighty climax of the third.
  • K330. There's a great version of this in a mono recording on a set of CDs of Mozart sonatas from Salzburg on the Orfeo label. It includes live performances of K330 by Haskil, Gould and Shura Cherksassky (the Cherkassky is marvelous), as well as good stuff by Gilels and Backhauss (and some bad stuff by Curzon and Arrau).

Has anyone else found any good ones?
« Last Edit: January 22, 2009, 01:49:50 PM by Mandryka »
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George

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Re: Mozart piano sonatas
« Reply #85 on: January 22, 2009, 10:33:03 AM »
I got Kraus's Music and Arts set (her first recording of these works) in the mail last night and I must say, her Mozart is excellent. Very expressive and not a dainty Mozart at all. Very refreshing!

George

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Re: Mozart piano sonatas
« Reply #86 on: January 22, 2009, 10:34:28 AM »
Are there any fans of Glenn Gould's Mozart?

I'd be interested to hear his Mozart, as a lot of people have told me that he hated the composer and that it shows in his interpretations.

Offline Peregrine

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Re: Mozart piano sonatas
« Reply #87 on: January 22, 2009, 10:34:38 AM »
I got Kraus's Music and Arts set (her first recording of these works) in the mail last night and I must say, her Mozart is excellent. Very expressive and not a dainty Mozart at all. Very refreshing!

I that set OOP, George?
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George

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Re: Mozart piano sonatas
« Reply #88 on: January 22, 2009, 11:23:41 AM »
I that set OOP, George?

I don't think so. Amazon US has it. I just bought it over the weekend. 

Offline dirkronk

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Re: Mozart piano sonatas
« Reply #89 on: January 22, 2009, 04:29:49 PM »
I got Kraus's Music and Arts set (her first recording of these works) in the mail last night and I must say, her Mozart is excellent. Very expressive and not a dainty Mozart at all. Very refreshing!

Congrats, George. Definitely a fine set to have long-term IMO. Enjoy.

Dirk

George

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Re: Mozart piano sonatas
« Reply #90 on: January 22, 2009, 04:33:08 PM »
Congrats, George. Definitely a fine set to have long-term IMO. Enjoy.

Dirk

Thanks, the enjoyment is underway.  ;D

Offline Dancing Divertimentian

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Re: Mozart piano sonatas
« Reply #91 on: January 22, 2009, 07:51:10 PM »
I'd be interested to hear his Mozart, as a lot of people have told me that he hated the composer and that it shows in his interpretations.

Make sure you sample before buying. Most likely you'll be just as turned off as most.


Veit Bach-a baker who found his greatest pleasure in a little cittern which he took with him even into the mill and played while the grinding was going on. In this way he had a chance to have the rhythm drilled into him. And this was the beginning of a musical inclination in his descendants. JS Bach

Online Mandryka

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Re: Mozart piano sonatas
« Reply #92 on: January 23, 2009, 02:12:03 AM »
I'd be interested to hear his Mozart, as a lot of people have told me that he hated the composer and that it shows in his interpretations.

It would be surprising if he hated Mozart, given that he played him throughout his career.

But he did think that some of the sonatas were overplayed, and so he tried to refresh them.

And he thought that they were mostly comic works -- buffo style is foremost in his Mozart sonata performances. He thought that some traditional performances were anachronistically romantic and overly serious.

With Gould's Mozart you have to pick and choose -- and there are some fantastic rewards in the set (I really think you won't be disappointed if you listen to the ones I listed, for example.) There are also some duds.

But which pianist don't you have to pick and choose with?!

By the way, the pianist who comes closest to the spirit of Gould in Mozart sonatas  is Bilson, I think. He is never quite as inspired as Gould at his very best -- but he's more consistant.
« Last Edit: January 23, 2009, 02:23:26 AM by Mandryka »
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Offline Sorin Eushayson

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Re: Mozart piano sonatas
« Reply #93 on: January 23, 2009, 03:21:02 AM »
It would be surprising if he hated Mozart, given that he played him throughout his career.
I believe it was Gould that made a statement somewhere along the lines that he thought Mozart died too late rather than too early.

I tried to find some samples of Bilson's work with the Mozart sonatas, but I couldn't!  :'(
« Last Edit: January 23, 2009, 03:43:50 AM by Sorin Eushayson »

Offline Herman

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Re: Mozart piano sonatas
« Reply #94 on: January 23, 2009, 03:41:43 AM »
But he did think that some of the sonatas were overplayed, and so he tried to refresh them.

With the exception of the 'alla turca' very few Mozart sonatas are performed on a regular basis, is my experience.

Mozart sonatas are just too difficult too bring off.

And he thought that they were mostly comic works -- buffo style is foremost in his Mozart sonata performances. He thought that some traditional performances were anachronistically romantic and overly serious.

You know, maybe the problem was Gould talked too much.

George

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Re: Mozart piano sonatas
« Reply #95 on: January 23, 2009, 03:43:05 AM »
But which pianist don't you have to pick and choose with?!

I'm really liking Kraus's first set on Music and Arts. Klein on Vox is consistent (and very cheap on amazon on two volumes http://www.amazon.com/Mozart-Piano-Sonatas-Vol-1/dp/B000001K2G) as is Uchida, if you like her style. Eschenbach on DG is one set that I never got but what have heard has been very consistent.


Online Mandryka

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Re: Mozart piano sonatas
« Reply #96 on: January 23, 2009, 04:46:24 AM »


You know, maybe the problem was Gould talked too much.


Hey Herman

Don't you like Gould's Mozart?
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Offline Herman

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Re: Mozart piano sonatas
« Reply #97 on: January 23, 2009, 05:28:56 AM »
No I don't, and I don't like his Bach either. I do like his Brahms record, though it's a long time ago I had a chance to hear it (I seem to have misplaced it).

Online Mandryka

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Re: Mozart piano sonatas
« Reply #98 on: January 23, 2009, 08:26:10 AM »
No I don't, and I don't like his Bach either. I do like his Brahms record, though it's a long time ago I had a chance to hear it (I seem to have misplaced it).

The only Gould  Bach I really like are some of the inventions, and I think he's good in the fourth Partita. The only Mozart of his I like are the ones I listed. I like the Brahms. I like the Beethoven late bagatelles, and his Pastoral sonata. I think his Hammerclavier is so interesting I like it. I quite like his Beethoven Piano Concerto 3 and 4, and the Bach concertos -- except the famous one with Bernstein.  I like the Liszt transcription of Beethoven 6 (I know -- I'm crazy). Oh -- and I like some of his Art of Fugue (on piano -- not organ!).

I even like his smart-arsy mouthiness. And I like his smouldering good looks.

I wish I knew someone who could make me see good things in his WTC -- I can't see anything good in it, but there must be some preludes or fugues which he plays well!

The thing that I find strange is this. I could make a similar list of good/not so good for any pianist -- Schnabel, Richter, Horowitz, Rubinstein. . . But lots of people get irrational about Gould. They either love him so much that they think he can do no wrong. Or they hate him so much that they think he can do no right.
« Last Edit: January 23, 2009, 08:50:01 AM by Mandryka »
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Offline Que

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Re: Mozart piano sonatas
« Reply #99 on: January 23, 2009, 09:35:16 AM »
I tried to find some samples of Bilson's work with the Mozart sonatas, but I couldn't!  :'(

Here you go! :)

Q