Author Topic: Schubert's String Quartets  (Read 18805 times)

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Offline amw

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Re: Schubert's String Quartets
« Reply #120 on: July 07, 2020, 06:19:19 AM »
missing from AMW's survey are a few major recrordings.

To be fair I did only include recordings that I own personally.

And for me the comparison between the Juilliard (Epic/Testament) and Petersen is mostly based on ensemble sound and general edginess and psychological readings. I do consider that valid for most other repertoire as well (eg Beethoven, Schoenberg) but it is always the Juilliards of the 1950s and 1960s that I’m comparing to; after Claus Adam and Raphael Hillyer’s departures the ensemble sound changed quite significantly.

Offline Que

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Re: Schubert's String Quartets
« Reply #121 on: July 07, 2020, 09:53:01 AM »
Curiously the Festetics Schubert quartet disc has "Tome 4" on the cover, so back then they apparently planned to do all? of them.

This is precisely what tipped me off to wondering if there was more. And if it was a case of Arcana's website deleting titles that are no longer in print.

Yep. I also assume that a whole series was planned that never materialised...  At least, I have never found any trace of it.

Considering the quality of the performances, very frustrating indeed.

Q

Offline Jo498

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Re: Schubert's String Quartets
« Reply #122 on: July 07, 2020, 10:49:26 AM »
We probably had this before but what is there on historical instruments Schubert quartets?

often out of print, but in principle existent:

Coll. Aureum (LP only) D 94, 810, 804 + 703 
Festetics D 804 + 46
Mosaiques D 804 +87, 810 + 173
Terpsycordes D 887 + Quartettsatz, 804 + 810
Chiaroscuro: D 804 (+Mozart), D 810 +173
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Online JBS

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Re: Schubert's String Quartets
« Reply #123 on: July 07, 2020, 11:07:07 AM »
We probably had this before but what is there on historical instruments Schubert quartets?

often out of print, but in principle existent:

Coll. Aureum (LP only) D 94, 810, 804 + 703 
Festetics D 804 + 46
Mosaiques D 804 +87, 810 + 173
Terpsycordes D 887 + Quartettsatz, 804 + 810
Chiaroscuro: D 804 (+Mozart), D 810 +173

L'Archibudelli did D 87, but apparently no other quartets.

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Offline Jo498

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Re: Schubert's String Quartets
« Reply #124 on: July 07, 2020, 11:12:03 AM »
tbh I don't care too much for any of the early quartets. But that D 87 seems the most popular and frequently recorded of them, is a total puzzle for me...
Struck by the sounds before the sun,
I knew the night had gone.
The morning breeze like a bugle blew
Against the drums of dawn.
(Bob Dylan)

Offline amw

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Re: Schubert's String Quartets
« Reply #125 on: July 07, 2020, 03:59:44 PM »
We probably had this before but what is there on historical instruments Schubert quartets?

often out of print, but in principle existent:

Coll. Aureum (LP only) D 94, 810, 804 + 703 
Festetics D 804 + 46
Mosaiques D 804 +87, 810 + 173
Terpsycordes D 887 + Quartettsatz, 804 + 810
Chiaroscuro: D 804 (+Mozart), D 810 +173

Skalholt Quartet (a Jaap Schröder pick-up band) did D703, D887 & D956. This was well after Schröder's good period so intonation is somewhat painful to listen to but I think Que likes them.

Offline Que

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Re: Schubert's String Quartets
« Reply #126 on: July 07, 2020, 08:41:50 PM »
Skalholt Quartet (a Jaap Schröder pick-up band) did D703, D887 & D956. This was well after Schröder's good period so intonation is somewhat painful to listen to but I think Que likes them.

Negative...

I did try some on Spotify because Gurn mentioned these recordings, but it is indeed painful to listen to!  :o

Q

Offline amw

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Re: Schubert's String Quartets
« Reply #127 on: July 07, 2020, 11:43:00 PM »
Negative...

I did try some on Spotify because Gurn mentioned these recordings, but it is indeed painful to listen to!  :o

Q
I was confusing you with Gurn, I guess—apologies.

At least someone likes them.

Offline Todd

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Re: Schubert's String Quartets
« Reply #128 on: July 12, 2020, 04:53:39 PM »
There are apparently five? "modern" complete recordings, Leipzig/MDG (hypercomplete with fragments included), Auryn/cpo, Kodaly/Naxos, Verdi/Haenssler, Diogenes/Brilliant. (There is one from the mid/late 70s with the Melos/DG and one from the 50s or early 60s with a Viennese quartet.)


Never having bought a complete Schubert String Quartet set, I dug around a little.  Ten sets have been recorded based on what I can find, though perhaps - and hopefully - there are more:

Vienna Konzerthaus (Westminster)
Endres (Vox)
Tanayev (Melodiya)
Melos (DG)
Vienna (Camerata)
Auryn (CPO)
Leipzig (MDG)
Kodaly (Naxos)
Verdi (Haenssler)
Diogenes (Brilliant)

They vary a bit in number of quartets recorded.  The Tanayev is available as a $5 download at Qobuz.  I did stream the Diogenes and it was quite good, but I should probably buy one or two or three, starting with the Auryn.
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Offline Jo498

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Re: Schubert's String Quartets
« Reply #129 on: July 13, 2020, 08:31:50 AM »
I wasn't aware of Endres and Vienna. Wiener Konzerthaus is very historical, Taneyev not quite as old but download only. (I think the latter is certainly worth $5.) The number varies probably because there are a bunch of fragments. I think the Leipzig is the most complete. I have not heard any of the Kodaly, Diogenes and Verdi but I think Auryn and Leipzig are both excellent. The advantage of the Leipzig (and the Kodaly) is that one can buy single discs.
Struck by the sounds before the sun,
I knew the night had gone.
The morning breeze like a bugle blew
Against the drums of dawn.
(Bob Dylan)

Offline aukhawk

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Re: Schubert's String Quartets
« Reply #130 on: July 13, 2020, 09:55:17 PM »
Not a complete set but I really like the Doric Quartet Nos.13 & 14.

Offline Jo498

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Re: Schubert's String Quartets
« Reply #131 on: July 13, 2020, 10:41:17 PM »
There are of course plenty of high level 13-15.
I think for most listeners, one recording will be sufficient for the early works (they are really extremely early, Schubert was 13-18 or so, earlier than almost all of the symphonies or piano sonatas), so the Taneyev download is a good option. Or, if one wants physical discs, Auryn for a very good cycle that is not too expensive.
Struck by the sounds before the sun,
I knew the night had gone.
The morning breeze like a bugle blew
Against the drums of dawn.
(Bob Dylan)

Offline Daverz

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Re: Schubert's String Quartets
« Reply #132 on: July 14, 2020, 02:10:09 AM »
One should note that most of the early pieces are really early, i.e. Schubert was about 15 when he wrote them. Some are interesting (e.g. the very first one that cannot decide between g minor and Bb major), but I hardly listen to them and don't think one needs more than one complete recording.

I thought these comments on the earlier quartets from Burton Rothleder in Fanfare were interesting:

    "Among the very earliest quartets, the most attractive movements are the Andante second
     movement of D 32—a plaintive song in A-Minor of exquisite beauty, the final movement of D 36—
     a bouncy and tuneful Allegro, and the final movement of D 46—a rapid Allegro dance, all from the
     pen of a 15 to 16 year old. Other movements in these early quartets also make rewarding
     listening.

     Four later quartets, before the final four quartets, are outstanding in their invention and musical
     line: the D-Major (D 74), the E♭-Major (D 87), the B♭-Major (D 112), and the G-Minor (D 173). I
     reserve a special place for the B♭-Major, which is an astounding achievement, even for what we
     have come to expect from 18-year-old Franz Schubert."

Offline Jo498

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Re: Schubert's String Quartets
« Reply #133 on: July 14, 2020, 03:21:43 AM »
Admittedly, I'd have to re-listen to comment on most of the early quartets. I think the g minor was my fav among the early ones. As I said above, I don't really get that the Eflat D 87 is so popular and often used as a filler. I find it rather boring (and it is also written in a style that betrays the limited abilities of some of the players it was written for, i.e. not very "quartet-like"). But one should certainly try all of them, just not expect too much.
Struck by the sounds before the sun,
I knew the night had gone.
The morning breeze like a bugle blew
Against the drums of dawn.
(Bob Dylan)

Offline Herman

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Re: Schubert's String Quartets
« Reply #134 on: July 14, 2020, 07:56:03 AM »
the C minor Quartettsatz is more frequently used as filler.

I used to know people who said they liked Schubert's quartet juvenalia, but I never did.

His early piano pieces seem more assured.