Author Topic: The Early Music Club (EMC)  (Read 320617 times)

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Online Biffo

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Re: Jean Richafort (born in Hainau dies in Brugges)
« Reply #1460 on: April 06, 2020, 12:36:29 AM »
His music for his small output is very interesting, well craft music, for it's respective time.All I'm aware is Ensemble Cenquencento's Requiem of his, fews Motets, perhaps chanson, or other things, please anyone know much more this composer of Kingdom of Burgundy, any other album full length of Richafort?

His Requiem (In memoriam Josquin Desprez) has also been recorded by the Huelgas-Ensemble directed by Paul Van Nevel (harmonia mundi); it is coupled with 6 motets.

Offline deprofundis

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Re: Jean Richafort (born in Hainau dies in Brugges)
« Reply #1461 on: April 06, 2020, 08:09:13 AM »
His Requiem (In memoriam Josquin Desprez) has also been recorded by the Huelgas-Ensemble directed by Paul Van Nevel (harmonia mundi); it is coupled with 6 motets.

I was not aware of Huelgas Ensemble recording thanks Biffo  for sharing.  8)
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Offline Que

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Re: Jean Richafort (born in Hainau dies in Brugges)
« Reply #1462 on: April 06, 2020, 08:44:21 AM »
I was not aware of Huelgas Ensemble recording thanks Biffo  for sharing.  8)



Also, volumes I, II, IV & V of the Leiden Choirbooks each contain a short piece by Johannes (Jean) Richafort.

Q

Offline deprofundis

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #1463 on: April 12, 2020, 05:06:51 PM »
I was really impressed by Jean Richafort, this is why I,m ordering ''Richafort Requiem'' on Signum label by King's  singers, soon...

You folks heard or have it?
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Offline deprofundis

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Antonius de Civitate 1410-1421
« Reply #1464 on: May 10, 2020, 06:07:41 AM »
Here a new name in ars subtilior  era  not well knowed  I have one album of his work called:

Antonius de Civitate un musicista fiulaano... ensemble Dramsam release in 1997 on some label ?

Any info  on him  or other recordings please folks.
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Offline (: premont :)

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Re: Antonius de Civitate 1410-1421
« Reply #1465 on: May 10, 2020, 09:31:06 AM »
Here a new name in ars subtilior  era  not well knowed  I have one album of his work called:

Antonius de Civitate un musicista fiulaano... ensemble Dramsam release in 1997 on some label ?

Any info  on him  or other recordings please folks.

Antonio da Cividale or Antonius de Civitate. Very little of his works have survived.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antonio_da_Cividale

Presto has some of it:

https://www.prestomusic.com/classical/search?search_query=%2FAntonio_da_Cividale
« Last Edit: May 10, 2020, 09:40:40 AM by (: premont :) »
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Offline deprofundis

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Re: Antonius de Civitate 1410-1421
« Reply #1466 on: May 10, 2020, 12:35:10 PM »
Antonio da Cividale or Antonius de Civitate. Very little of his works have survived.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antonio_da_Cividale

Presto has some of it:

https://www.prestomusic.com/classical/search?search_query=%2FAntonio_da_Cividale
Thanks Premont for sharing
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Offline TheGSMoeller

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #1467 on: May 22, 2020, 06:55:53 PM »
Double posting from the Purchased Thread...

Been working on a big Early Music haul for the past month or so. There are even a few others I didn't post a pretty picture of, one more Josquin (Clerk's Group), two Ockeghem (Tallis Scholars, Oxford Camerata), and Requiem compilation (Tallis Scholars). I have a few more I'd like to get, as I'm becoming more and more obsessed with this era.

   

Online Mandryka

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #1468 on: May 23, 2020, 07:45:27 AM »
Double posting from the Purchased Thread...

Been working on a big Early Music haul for the past month or so. There are even a few others I didn't post a pretty picture of, one more Josquin (Clerk's Group), two Ockeghem (Tallis Scholars, Oxford Camerata), and Requiem compilation (Tallis Scholars). I have a few more I'd like to get, as I'm becoming more and more obsessed with this era.

   

I know all of these except the Glossa Gesualdo. There are some very good things there, given that you're open to the style of the performances, the broad approach, there are no failures or major disappointments.

You may find that the Gesualdo stands out from the rest -- a totally different musical tradition from Josquin, Dufay and Ockeghem.

It was very pleasant this afternoon to be reminded of Marc Leones's Josquin intabulations recording.
« Last Edit: May 23, 2020, 10:28:02 AM by Mandryka »
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Offline TheGSMoeller

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #1469 on: May 23, 2020, 02:15:07 PM »
I know all of these except the Glossa Gesualdo. There are some very good things there, given that you're open to the style of the performances, the broad approach, there are no failures or major disappointments.

You may find that the Gesualdo stands out from the rest -- a totally different musical tradition from Josquin, Dufay and Ockeghem.

It was very pleasant this afternoon to be reminded of Marc Leones's Josquin intabulations recording.

I've had a fairly good Early Music selection already, and the several Gesualdo discs I did have I do cherish (Concerto Italiano, Les Arts Florissants, Hilliard Ensemble), but I'm anxious for these new additions . I had originally only obtained one recording of many works, but the past year I've realized that, similar to most classical pieces, there is much more to discover from these multiple performances. And I also find myself gravitating more towards the performances with one-voice-per-part.
 

Here are few more that I've ordered this year including Gesulado's music.


Offline milk

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #1470 on: July 02, 2020, 08:18:33 PM »
I've been listening to much music from La Reverdie recently. I think it's because of the recommendation of Mandryka. I gotta say that it's pretty hard to understand early vocal music even though I now feel very attracted. I like La Reverdie but I don't know why I like them better when comparing them to other groups via Von Bingen's music. I really like simple, unforced, un-operatic sounding voices.
Anyway, it's hard to understand HOW to listen to early vocal music and I don't yet know the difference between monophonic and polyphonic music - in the way it sounds really. Some of this is chanting, some of it something else. 
I started out listening to "Historia Sancti Eadmundi." I quite like this. I also like Von Bingen. I guess there's a lot of famous church music and famous names like Dufay. I don't yet know what to listen for with this music. So I'm here to complain about the hugeness of this genre and my own laziness.
Does anyone have any hints in how you came to appreciate this music, how you came to figure out what you like and why, how you came to evaluate your tastes and the performances?
What are the big differences between performance styles of early music? I'm trying to figure out why I like La Reverdie too.
Do you think this genre is hard on laymen?
I also wonder about people listening to this music in its day. I'm assuming that was done in churches. Didn't everyone fall asleep in the pews? I like to doze off to this stuff. They didn't even have coffee.

Offline milk

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #1471 on: July 03, 2020, 01:25:57 AM »
What an amazing sounding recording.

Online Mandryka

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #1472 on: July 03, 2020, 06:06:17 AM »
So I'm here to complain about the hugeness of this genre and my own laziness.


There's about 300 years separating Hildegard and Dufay, about the same as there is between Bach and us. And there's lots of music pre Hildegard. So I wouldn't try to bite it all off at once!

I've been listening to much music from La Reverdie recently. . .  I really like simple, unforced, un-operatic sounding voices. . .  I don't yet know what to listen for with this music. What are the big differences between performance styles of early music?

La Reverdie are unforced, as you say. They can sometimes emphasise regular rhythms, and they can sometimes cut the music up into short phrases.  An alternative approach would be more fluid, sensual, graceful, and more raw and visceral.


Does anyone have any hints in how you came to appreciate this music, how you came to figure out what you like and why, how you came to evaluate your tastes and the performances?

The singer matters, I have to click with the singer's voice. My advice to you is to dabble around aimlessly and informally until you find a singer who turns you on and then find all the recordings that that singer made -- explore the repertoire that way.
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Offline deprofundis

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #1473 on: July 03, 2020, 09:29:37 PM »
What was you're first love in Genre of ancient lore?


Gregorian (pre medieval)
Ars Vetus
Ars Nova
Ars subtilior

Simple question simple answer please ,I really like Ars Vetus simplicity straighforwardness
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Offline milk

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #1474 on: July 04, 2020, 02:34:07 AM »
Hmm...Gregorian was sometimes sung by women?

Is anyone willing to start in the 10th century and give an example or two, from each century leading up to the renaissance, of music and recordings that you like? And why?

As far as Hildegard, what are the favorites around here? Who are the other successful composer from Von Bingen’s day? This is monophonic music, right? What other great monophonic me is exists? Who the the first polyphonic composers?


Online Biffo

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #1475 on: July 04, 2020, 04:48:38 AM »
Hmm...Gregorian was sometimes sung by women?

Is anyone willing to start in the 10th century and give an example or two, from each century leading up to the renaissance, of music and recordings that you like? And why?

As far as Hildegard, what are the favorites around here? Who are the other successful composer from Von Bingen’s day? This is monophonic music, right? What other great monophonic me is exists? Who the the first polyphonic composers?

This period of music (pre 1450) doesn't really interest me and I would be pushed to give examples of even one composer from each century, especially as a lot (most?) of the music is anonymous.

The earliest music I can find in my collection is from the Codex Calixtinus and this dates from the 12th century; the manuscript is in two parts, the first works in the gregorian style, the second early examples of polyphony. It has been recorded by Ensemble Venance Fortunat and possibly others.

Martin Codax (mid 13th century) has left a small collection of songs in Gallo-Portuguese. These are beautifully sung by the splendidly named Vivabiancaluna Biffi in an album called Ondas.

Jordi Savall has recorded albums from this era including one devoted to troubadour music (c 1200) - Cansos de Trobairitz and also the Libre Vermeil de Montserrat - a 14th century pilgrimage

There is three disc set from David Munrow - Music from the Gothic Era you might want to explore, it has mainly named composers. It is probably rather dated now for the early music enthusiasts

Offline deprofundis

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #1476 on: July 04, 2020, 04:55:23 AM »
Hmm...Gregorian was sometimes sung by women?

Is anyone willing to start in the 10th century and give an example or two, from each century leading up to the renaissance, of music and recordings that you like? And why?

As far as Hildegard, what are the favorites around here? Who are the other successful composer from Von Bingen’s day? This is monophonic music, right? What other great monophonic me is exists? Who the the first polyphonic composers?


Nokter Balbulus or Hermann der Lame perhaps?
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Offline milk

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #1477 on: July 04, 2020, 06:29:10 AM »
This period of music (pre 1450) doesn't really interest me and I would be pushed to give examples of even one composer from each century, especially as a lot (most?) of the music is anonymous.

The earliest music I can find in my collection is from the Codex Calixtinus and this dates from the 12th century; the manuscript is in two parts, the first works in the gregorian style, the second early examples of polyphony. It has been recorded by Ensemble Venance Fortunat and possibly others.

Martin Codax (mid 13th century) has left a small collection of songs in Gallo-Portuguese. These are beautifully sung by the splendidly named Vivabiancaluna Biffi in an album called Ondas.

Jordi Savall has recorded albums from this era including one devoted to troubadour music (c 1200) - Cansos de Trobairitz and also the Libre Vermeil de Montserrat - a 14th century pilgrimage

There is three disc set from David Munrow - Music from the Gothic Era you might want to explore, it has mainly named composers. It is probably rather dated now for the early music enthusiasts
thanks for these recommendations. Post-1450 is polyphonic?

Has anyone heard this ensemble?



Nokter Balbulus or Hermann der Lame perhaps?
thanks!
« Last Edit: July 04, 2020, 06:31:28 AM by milk »

Online Biffo

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #1478 on: July 04, 2020, 06:36:55 AM »
thanks for these recommendations. Post-1450 is polyphonic?

Has anyone heard this ensemble?

 thanks!

Generally speaking yes but a mass or vespers would have sections that were plainsong. Some of the longer prayers were set with alternating verses of plainsong and polyphony otherwise the service would be impractically long.

Offline milk

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #1479 on: July 04, 2020, 06:30:25 PM »
Martin Codax (mid 13th century) has left a small collection of songs in Gallo-Portuguese. These are beautifully sung by the splendidly named Vivabiancaluna Biffi in an album called Ondas.

How about Supramusica? I’m listening to that Martin Codax because I could find it.