Author Topic: The Early Music Club (EMC)  (Read 396924 times)

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Offline Mandryka

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #1620 on: September 05, 2021, 06:49:51 PM »
Hello folks  I am listening to William Cornysh live in Rome Tallis Scholars this is actually quite good but when it come to a composer I like them I get a bit bias but take for granted White, Fayrfax, Parsons, Browne, Lambe is equally splendid. Love English Polyphony Godz!!

What do you think of William Cornysh?

People should  the ensemble The Clerks for Cornysh too you might see what I see or ear what I heard see, the beauty of English polyphony of Tudors time hey?

Do you mean The Cardinall’s Music or is there some Cornysh by The Clerks on record? The Andrew Carwood and David Skinner CD is excellent.

Some amazing Cornysh on this CD - Paul Hillier evidently liked Woefully Arrayed - he recorded it again with Ars Nova Copenhagen.



I’ve heard Tallis Scholars sing Cornysh in concert and it was very good indeed. But in the Stabat Mater I prefer the more austere interpretation by Andrew Kirkman in their 2021 recording.
« Last Edit: September 05, 2021, 07:03:06 PM by Mandryka »
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Offline deprofundis

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #1621 on: September 06, 2021, 03:47:12 AM »
Do you mean The Cardinall’s Music or is there some Cornysh by The Clerks on record? The Andrew Carwood and David Skinner CD is excellent.

Some amazing Cornysh on this CD - Paul Hillier evidently liked Woefully Arrayed - he recorded it again with Ars Nova Copenhagen.



I’ve heard Tallis Scholars sing Cornysh in concert and it was very good indeed. But in the Stabat Mater I prefer the more austere interpretation by Andrew Kirkman in their 2021 recording.

You're correct my friend, cher mandryka, bonjour cher ami  8)

Offline aligreto

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #1622 on: September 06, 2021, 04:45:02 AM »
Musik Des Trecento Um Jacopo Da Bologna [Ricercare-Ensemble fur Alte Musik, Zurich]





This is very interesting and, to me, authentic sounding music making [released in 1973] of songs and dances from fourteenth century Italy.
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Offline SonicMan46

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #1623 on: September 06, 2021, 11:01:28 AM »
Hello folks  I am listening to William Cornysh live in Rome Tallis Scholars this is actually quite good but when it come to a composer I like them I get a bit bias but take for granted White, Fayrfax, Parsons, Browne, Lambe is equally splendid. Love English Polyphony Godz!!

What do you think of William Cornysh?

People should  the ensemble The Clerks for Cornysh too you might see what I see or ear what I heard see, the beauty of English polyphony of Tudors time hey?

Well, just started going through my 'early music' collection alphabetically (that's just how it's arranged -  :laugh:) - finishing up William Byrd this afternoon and into the 'c' - only have 1 CD by William Cornysh (1465-1523), an earlier English Renaissance composer, gone 20 years or so before William Byrd was born - will take a listen soon, but cannot add much more.  Dave :)


Offline (: premont :)

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #1624 on: September 06, 2021, 04:21:39 PM »
Musik Des Trecento Um Jacopo Da Bologna [Ricercare-Ensemble fur Alte Musik, Zurich]





This is very interesting and, to me, authentic sounding music making [released in 1973] of songs and dances from fourteenth century Italy.

If you like Jacopo, there are some equally interesting recordings of his works by La Reverdie and Ensemble Project Ars Nova.
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Offline Mandryka

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #1625 on: September 06, 2021, 06:11:29 PM »
If you like Jacopo, there are some equally interesting recordings of his works by La Reverdie and Ensemble Project Ars Nova.

Which PAN recording are you thinking of?

Sampling things by Jacopo I just came across this interesting concert recording, which sounds as though it was made in the audience



Like Aligreto I’m kind of intrigued by the singing on that Reflexe CD
« Last Edit: September 06, 2021, 06:32:20 PM by Mandryka »
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Offline SonicMan46

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #1626 on: September 07, 2021, 12:38:17 PM »
Well, I was up to Giovanni Gabrieli in listening to my 'Early Music' collection, when the CD below popped up - the reason was the poems praising the Virgin Mary were set to popular medieval melodies by Gautier de Coincy (short bio below w/ link).  Forgot how good this production is - great music, use of various instruments, vocals, stories - see the attached reviews.  Recommended.  Dave :)

Quote
Gautier de Coincy (1177–1236) was a French abbot, trouvère and musical arranger, chiefly known for his devotion to the Virgin Mary. While he served as prior of Vic-sur-Aisne he compiled Les Miracles de Nostre-Dame (known in English as The Miracles of Notre Dame or The Miracles of Our Lady) in which he set poems in praise of the Virgin Mary to popular melodies and songs of his day. It is a reverential but humorous work, full of love for the cult of the Virgin Mary, which at that time also received attention from Saint Bernard of Clairvaux who was the leading medieval proponent of veneration of the Virgin as a counterbalance to the more rigorous Christian scholasticism, then the dominating spiritual force. (Source)


Offline (: premont :)

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #1627 on: September 07, 2021, 01:08:46 PM »
Which PAN recording are you thinking of?

Like Aligreto I’m kind of intrigued by the singing on that Reflexe CD

This one:

https://www.amazon.de/Italienische-Madrigale-Jahrhunderts-Jacopo-Bologna/dp/B00005R0CH/

More informative page.

http://www.medieval.org/emfaq/cds/dhm0738.htm

« Last Edit: September 07, 2021, 09:15:43 PM by Que »
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Offline deprofundis

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #1628 on: September 07, 2021, 04:28:03 PM »
Little Help here I purchased two gnarly LP's Early Renaissance music whit Conrad Paumann, and ??? don't know the full program of this marvelous LP

Also bought Early Renaissance music on same label Archive Production a label affiliated whit Deutsch Gramophone, both LP are worth separately 100 US each , got them two for 10 US + shipping, insane shipping but good price never the less hey.

Wow what on Both Of these LP what year were they produced or release, so I had rare LP's for price of peanuts sac and thee artist are unknown since I tried to find them on discogs no information, got a soft spot for 1950 and  early 1960 vinyl there the best, it's like Christine's Stephen King brilliant novel, the LP will become a part of me, old archive production is a gold mine WOW, any comment fellows whom own one or the other LP I'm talking about please?

 :)
« Last Edit: September 07, 2021, 09:12:22 PM by Que »

Offline SonicMan46

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #1629 on: September 08, 2021, 08:08:58 AM »
Gibbons, Orlando (1583-1625) - Keyboard Works w/ Christopher Hogwood on a cabinet organ, Italian spinet, & a harpsichord and James Johnstone on a harpsichord and virginals - just pulled my 5 CDs of the music of Gibbons (short bio quoted); despite a premature death in his early 40s, his LIST OF COMPOSITIONS is impressive, much secular and sacred vocal music - his KB works are shown in the lower pic from the link, about 40+ pieces listed by number as MB XX - thus this music can easily fit on two CDs - the ones in my collection have about 8 or so works overlapped, so I have about 3/4s of this output.  I was curious if a more recent double-disc release might have appeared but can find just one w/ Pienaar on piano (poor review in Fanfare - have not looked for others).  I'll be posting my other CDs of Gibbons later - likely will receive some recommendations!  Dave :)

Quote
Orlando Gibbons was an English composer and keyboard player who was one of the last masters of the English Virginalist School and English Madrigal School. The best known member of a musical family dynasty, by the 1610s he was the leading composer and organist in England, with a career cut short by his sudden death in 1625. As a result, Gibbons's oeuvre was not as large as that of his contemporaries, like the elder William Byrd,[2] but he made considerable contributions to many genres of his time. He is often seen as a transitional figure from the Renaissance to the Baroque periods. (Source)

   


Offline Mandryka

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #1630 on: September 08, 2021, 10:25:25 AM »
Gibbons, Orlando (1583-1625) - Keyboard Works w/ Christopher Hogwood on a cabinet organ, Italian spinet, & a harpsichord and James Johnstone on a harpsichord and virginals - just pulled my 5 CDs of the music of Gibbons (short bio quoted); despite a premature death in his early 40s, his LIST OF COMPOSITIONS is impressive, much secular and sacred vocal music - his KB works are shown in the lower pic from the link, about 40+ pieces listed by number as MB XX - thus this music can easily fit on two CDs - the ones in my collection have about 8 or so works overlapped, so I have about 3/4s of this output.  I was curious if a more recent double-disc release might have appeared but can find just one w/ Pienaar on piano (poor review in Fanfare - have not looked for others).  I'll be posting my other CDs of Gibbons later - likely will receive some recommendations!  Dave :)

   



 I find Gibbons quite a difficult composer. I listened to the Hogwood today by coincidence, I've got a good amateur transfer which I can let you have if you want, better sound than the commercial one but you can hear the LP surfaces. Other ones to think about seriously are Richard Egarr (my favourite because he's a poet), Laurent Stewart (my second favourite), John Toll (who's a bit like a modern Thurston Dart --  all about energy and movement forward) and Richard Wooley (organ - a very good organ! with some choral pieces too.)
« Last Edit: September 08, 2021, 10:31:25 AM by Mandryka »
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Offline Mandryka

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Offline SonicMan46

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #1632 on: September 08, 2021, 10:51:00 AM »
I find Gibbons quite a difficult composer. I listened to the Hogwood today by coincidence, I've got a good amateur transfer which I can let you have if you want, better sound than the commercial one but you can hear the LP surfaces. Other ones to think about seriously are Richard Egarr (my favourite because he's a poet), Laurent Stewart (my second favourite), John Toll (who's a bit like a modern Thurston Dart --  all about energy and movement forward) and Richard Wooley (organ - a very good organ! with some choral pieces too.)

Thanks for the comments - the Hogwood CD I own, despite being from 1975, sounded fine to me - I also liked the Johnstone but looked at many of the ones above which are still available on Amazon - will re-check and may add or replace one?  And I agree that Gibbons can be confusing - trying to go through his list of compositions is not easy relative to the organization - but will be posting the other 3 I own, so hopefully some comments and suggestions will be forthcoming?  Dave :)

Offline SonicMan46

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #1633 on: September 08, 2021, 11:04:15 AM »
Gibbons, Orlando - Samplings of his church music, anthems, verse anthems, and viol pieces from the 3 CDs below - looking at his list of compositions HERE, I'm trying to make more sense of his output - below is the main listing from the link; I've quickly counted the number of works in each category (blue numbers in parentheses) - add up to about 140+ works.  Appears that the discs below at least are representative of this listing - not sure that I really want any more, but looking forward to any suggestions?  Are we lucky that he died young? - 20 more years of life would probably have at least doubled this output -  8)   Dave

   


Offline Mandryka

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #1634 on: September 08, 2021, 11:18:07 AM »
One pioneering recording of Gibbons is by  David Wulstan and his choir The Clerks of Oxenford. Wulston investigated authentic performance practice and concluded that the music was designed to be sung transposed up, this makes the lower voices much less muddy. The recording is old, and sounds old, but is treasurable, adorable.

If you're interested in the consort music, there was a so called breakthrough recording released a couple of years ago by François Joubert-Caillet's ensemble  L'Achéron. A breakthrough because of the way they've designed and put together their set of instruments. As I say I find Gibbons difficult so I won't comment further, except to say that the pieces I like most are the three part fantasies (not so keen on the five and six part ones) and I like Savall's romantic and lyrical style very much. Concordia also interesting in this music, from memory.
« Last Edit: September 08, 2021, 11:24:04 AM by Mandryka »
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Offline SonicMan46

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #1635 on: September 08, 2021, 12:26:36 PM »
One pioneering recording of Gibbons is by  David Wulstan and his choir The Clerks of Oxenford. Wulston investigated authentic performance practice and concluded that the music was designed to be sung transposed up, this makes the lower voices much less muddy. The recording is old, and sounds old, but is treasurable, adorable.

If you're interested in the consort music, there was a so called breakthrough recording released a couple of years ago by François Joubert-Caillet's ensemble  L'Achéron. A breakthrough because of the way they've designed and put together their set of instruments. As I say I find Gibbons difficult so I won't comment further, except to say that the pieces I like most are the three part fantasies (not so keen on the five and six part ones) and I like Savall's romantic and lyrical style very much. Concordia also interesting in this music, from memory.

Hi Mandryka - again, thanks for the help, but I'm getting a 'splitting headache' trying to sort out Gibbons!  :laugh:  I'm now advancing to John Jenkins and some viol music w/ Fretwork to start, followed by Phantasm.  BUT - many of your recommendations are either hard to find or not cheap on Amazon USA; however, I was able to setup two Spotify playlists: 1) David Wulstan and The Clerks of Oxenford; François Joubert-Caillet's ensemble  L'Achéron; plus 2 other recordings; and 2) Egarr; Toll; Pienaar on piano (had to just hear it -  ;D).  Need some mental peace for now so will listen to Spotify later - thanks again.  Dave :)

P.S. I did compare Richard Egaar's list of works (not too bad a price on Amazon but used copy) w/ the two KB CDs in my possession - virtually all but 4 are duplicated (and I also have Egaar w/ others and enjoy), but will listen on Spotify.

Offline Mandryka

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #1636 on: September 08, 2021, 12:53:07 PM »
Gibbons is headachy, for sure. This is the best cure

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Offline SonicMan46

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #1637 on: September 08, 2021, 01:09:51 PM »
Gibbons is headachy, for sure. This is the best cure

 

Well, cannot see your pic - but added one potential cure appropriate for the Tudor era above -  ??? :laugh:  Dave

Offline Mandryka

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #1638 on: September 08, 2021, 06:09:52 PM »
Well, cannot see your pic - but added one potential cure appropriate for the Tudor era above -  ??? :laugh:  Dave

https://www.prestomusic.com/classical/products/8287917--the-excellency-of-hand
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Offline SonicMan46

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #1639 on: September 09, 2021, 07:18:37 AM »
I find Gibbons quite a difficult composer. I listened to the Hogwood today by coincidence, I've got a good amateur transfer which I can let you have if you want, better sound than the commercial one but you can hear the LP surfaces. Other ones to think about seriously are Richard Egarr (my favourite because he's a poet), Laurent Stewart (my second favourite), John Toll (who's a bit like a modern Thurston Dart --  all about energy and movement forward) and Richard Wooley (organ - a very good organ! with some choral pieces too.)

Thanks for the comments - the Hogwood CD I own, despite being from 1975, sounded fine to me - I also liked the Johnstone but looked at many of the ones above which are still available on Amazon - will re-check and may add or replace one?  And I agree that Gibbons can be confusing - trying to go through his list of compositions is not easy relative to the organization - but will be posting the other 3 I own, so hopefully some comments and suggestions will be forthcoming?  Dave :)

Well, I just finished listening to the recordings below on Spotify and enjoyed both - my Hogwood CD is just 52 mins in length and has dated sound - found a 'used' copy of Toll on Amazon USA and made a purchase - will replace the Hogwood (just loosing 3-4 pieces and picking up 5).  Thanks again for the suggestions.  Dave :)