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The Early Music Club (EMC)

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The new erato:
I like medieval music. Machaut is superb. And the Florentine composers, Ciconia and above all Landini, are favorites. Dunstaple as well. Where to draw the line between medieval and renaissance though? Is Dufay clearly renaissance?

The new erato:
This is a must:



This,also on zig-zag, has received superb reviews and are currently on my wish list.



Micrologus have done a series of fine recordings for Opus 111 worth seeking out.

And then you have the series of fine recordings by Gothic Voices on Hyperion, though they crosses over into early renaissance as often as not. Though I don't think that is a proble, or that the distinction is necessarily very clear-cut.

FideLeo:

--- Quote from: erato on October 07, 2007, 12:14:23 AM ---I like medieval music. Machaut is superb. And the Florentine composers, Ciconia and above all Landini, are favorites. Dunstaple as well. Where to draw the line between medieval and renaissance though? Is Dufay clearly renaissance?

--- End quote ---

Dufay's isorhythmic motets are often viewed as the last medieval works in the genre.   Some of the most complex medieval music was produced sometime before Dufay at the Papal court at Avignon in the style of "Ars subtilior"  For me the best medieval music recordings were made by a group called "Ensemble Gilles Binchois" (on the Cantus, Virgin Verita and Ambrosie labels) ranging from plainchants to Leonin and Perotin to Machaut's "Messe de Nostre Dame" to the chansons by Dufay and Binchois.  The Austrian Unicorn Ensemble, which once recorded for Naxos, have made some affordable and fun recordings as well, in very good sound.  Enthusiasts of the Cantigas and Andalusian repertories should seek out issues from the ongoing integral series by the Spanish Ensemble Eduardo Paniagua.  I like them a lot more than I do the various Jordi Savall efforts.   :D

Lethevich:

--- Quote from: erato on October 07, 2007, 12:14:23 AM ---Is Dufay clearly renaissance?

--- End quote ---

He is part of the Burgundy School which is considered very early renaissance.

The new erato:

--- Quote from: Lethe on October 07, 2007, 12:32:55 AM ---He is part of the Burgundy School which is considered very early renaissance.

--- End quote ---
Yes - but lots of his motets and chansons are stylistically much closer to Machaut than to the high renaissance. But whatever; if one likes Medieval Music one should look into early Dufay. And the transformation of this into renaissance is very interesting, as are all major stylistic shifts (like the transformation into Baroque in Tuscany/northern Italy, fin-de-siecle Vienna or between-the wars Paris.

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