Author Topic: The Early Music Club (EMC)  (Read 261356 times)

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Offline Florestan

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #720 on: April 02, 2015, 04:47:19 AM »
I just prefer the sound men singing this repertory.

I see. I suppose you're not into opera either.   :)
“I compose music because I must give expression to my feelings, just as I talk because I must give utterance to my thoughts.”  --- Rachmaninoff

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #721 on: April 02, 2015, 04:48:02 AM »
My preference is not based on historical reasons, but because of the sound of women's voices.  And for mixed groups, if the balance is top heavy it is not to my taste.

Boy trebles have less "heft" in the balance, so that is another advantage.
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Offline San Antone

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #722 on: April 02, 2015, 04:50:08 AM »
I see. I suppose you're not into opera either.   :)

Not a problem (depending on the work), nor is lieder, or female soloists.   Pie Jesu from the Durufle Requiem is beautiful, especially sung by Janet Baker.  The preference I am speaking of is limited to very early up to Medieval music.  Monteverdi madrigals are already too late to figure in.  Anonymous 4 has made a specialty of early chant, which is exactly the music I prefer to hear sung by men.
« Last Edit: April 02, 2015, 04:53:16 AM by sanantonio »

Offline aligreto

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #723 on: April 02, 2015, 08:04:22 AM »
Palestrina: Lesson 1 for Maundy Thursday from this CD....


The ability to talk comes with knowledge. The ability to listen comes with wisdom.

Offline San Antone

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #724 on: April 02, 2015, 07:18:24 PM »
Plorer, Gemir, Crier: Homage to the Golden Voice of Johannes Ockeghem
Antoine Guerber (Conductor), Diabolus in Musica



Very fine.

Offline Gordo

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #725 on: April 03, 2015, 06:40:46 PM »
The preference I am speaking of is limited to very early up to Medieval music.  Monteverdi madrigals are already too late to figure in.

Even so, in regards to Monteverdi, IIRC, you're one of the very few people here that have expressed a very good opinion of Delitiae Musicae which I certainly share.  :)
Musica lætitiæ comes medicina dolorum
(Music is a companion to joy and a medicine for pains)

Offline EigenUser

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #726 on: April 05, 2015, 02:40:09 PM »
A while ago I read that the fourth movement of Messiaen's Et Exspecto Resurrectionem Mortuorum was based off of a Gregorian Easter chant. Would anyone happen to know what exactly this chant is? I'd like to hear it in its original setting. Here is the fourth movement of the Messiaen, in case it helps (which it probably won't because I'm sure it has been mangled beyond recognition :laugh:).
Beethoven's Op. 133 -- A fugue so bad that even Beethoven himself called it "Grosse".

Offline San Antone

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #727 on: April 05, 2015, 04:08:52 PM »
Even so, in regards to Monteverdi, IIRC, you're one of the very few people here that have expressed a very good opinion of Delitiae Musicae which I certainly share.  :)

Is it the Naxos series for Monteverdi and Gesualdo that you are thinking of?  I do consider them very worthwhile recordings.

Online The new erato

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #728 on: April 05, 2015, 11:19:56 PM »
Even so, in regards to Monteverdi, IIRC, you're one of the very few people here that have expressed a very good opinion of Delitiae Musicae which I certainly share.  :)
Well, I like them too, and said so some years ago.

Offline San Antone

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #729 on: April 06, 2015, 05:53:36 AM »
Just discovered a series of recordings covering the music of the trouveres and troubadours. I am listening to vol. 6, but will certainly check out vols 1-5



Troubadours Art Ensemble 
Zuchetto, Gerard - Conductor

Offline Gordo

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #730 on: April 06, 2015, 08:54:35 AM »
Well, I like them too, and said so some years ago.

Of course! You're among the very few.  :D
Musica lætitiæ comes medicina dolorum
(Music is a companion to joy and a medicine for pains)

Offline Gordo

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #731 on: April 06, 2015, 08:59:28 AM »
Is it the Naxos series for Monteverdi and Gesualdo that you are thinking of?  I do consider them very worthwhile recordings.

Yes, but just Monteverdi, I bought the complete collection. On the other hand, I never liked Gesualdo. It's probably too much experimental for my usual tastes.  ;D
Musica lætitiæ comes medicina dolorum
(Music is a companion to joy and a medicine for pains)

Offline San Antone

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #732 on: April 06, 2015, 09:53:17 AM »
Yes, but just Monteverdi, I bought the complete collection. On the other hand, I never liked Gesualdo. It's probably too much experimental for my usual tastes.  ;D

Ah, the Prince of Venosa and Count of Conza is too much for you!   :o

Offline Mandryka

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #733 on: April 06, 2015, 09:46:26 PM »
Two fantastic recordings by Pierre Hamon, Marc Mauillon, and others performing music of Guillaume de Machaut.

Remede de Fortune Import



Mon chant vous envoy



On Mon Chant Vous Envoy, the team formed in 2005 by Pierre Hamon around the exceptional baritone Marc Mauillon continues to explore the work of the great French musician-poet of the 14th century, Guillaume de Machaut. The album's collection of songs, virelais, ballads and roundels of Guillaume de Machaut exemplify the composer's understanding of the poetic art of courtly love, whose melodies are part of our memory and our psyche. Mauillon is an exceptional talent even in the current environment of medieval music and these melodies 700 years on still maintain an impact. Marc Mauillon is accompanied by his sister Angelique Mauillon on harp, violinist VivaBiancaLuna Biffi, and group leader Pierre Hamon on flute.

One outstanding Marc Mauillon disc is called L'amoureus tourment. I play it a lot.
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Offline EigenUser

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #734 on: April 06, 2015, 11:13:11 PM »
A while ago I read that the fourth movement of Messiaen's Et Exspecto Resurrectionem Mortuorum was based off of a Gregorian Easter chant. Would anyone happen to know what exactly this chant is? I'd like to hear it in its original setting. Here is the fourth movement of the Messiaen, in case it helps (which it probably won't because I'm sure it has been mangled beyond recognition :laugh:).
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9NbjEA7WCYs
Does anyone have any idea what I'm talking about?
Beethoven's Op. 133 -- A fugue so bad that even Beethoven himself called it "Grosse".

Offline DaveF

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #735 on: April 06, 2015, 11:56:22 PM »
Of course! You're among the very few [to express a liking for Delitiæ Musicæ].  :D

Me too - my favourite group for the Monteverdi madrigals.  An 8th book from them would be good - although it's been a long time since they recorded Book 7.
« Last Edit: April 07, 2015, 12:25:03 PM by DaveF »
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Offline San Antone

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #736 on: April 07, 2015, 02:54:28 AM »
Does anyone have any idea what I'm talking about?

The theme Messiaen uses in the beginning sounds similar to the Introit chant for Easter day.  Here's one recording with the chants for Easter Mass

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/oPLRZGaqA3A" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/oPLRZGaqA3A</a>
« Last Edit: April 07, 2015, 03:27:07 AM by sanantonio »

Offline EigenUser

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #737 on: April 07, 2015, 05:42:32 AM »
The theme Messiaen uses in the beginning sounds similar to the Introit chant for Easter day.  Here's one recording with the chants for Easter Mass

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/oPLRZGaqA3A" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/oPLRZGaqA3A</a>
That is definitely it. It must be. Thanks for the help!

I've had the Messiaen-ized version stuck in my head all day today so far.
Beethoven's Op. 133 -- A fugue so bad that even Beethoven himself called it "Grosse".

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #738 on: April 07, 2015, 02:42:47 PM »
The theme Messiaen uses in the beginning sounds similar to the Introit chant for Easter day.  Here's one recording with the chants for Easter Mass

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/oPLRZGaqA3A" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/oPLRZGaqA3A</a>

Nice catch!

Offline San Antone

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #739 on: April 16, 2015, 04:25:55 AM »
New (to me) discovery.  This recording from 2010 features a group, sounds like OVPP, male (with boy soprano) after reading more from their site they are a mixed group, of Thomas Tallis.



Worth a listen.
« Last Edit: April 16, 2015, 04:36:02 AM by sanantonio »