Schoenberg's Sheen

Started by karlhenning, April 12, 2007, 07:35:28 AM

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Mandryka




From Triodes by HJ Prynne

Pandora wrote down her next sight
  of the ossuary in cryptic notation,
      scribbled on her pad; she knew
    the dockets flailed in a price sinkage.
Irene took notes at work; but they dropped
    right out of view, these low-level war figures
      in muzzy profile for a watching brief
  from day to day...

       *  *  *

Right on the nerve uh sweet sugar light! - we
    were accused by harsh desire,
  desire for goodness and protein bonds,
      for sex with our native tongue.
We applied, we tapped on round after round
  as cocking our elbows we saw them fall,
    hot blowing wind to mock weapon
      audit franchise, our amiable
    recoil scores for angry sore points.
At the loading ramps of free misery we both
      did cry out with ecstatic joy
  and not by mistake in gorgeous trip
      on the wheel of punishment -
we saw arch after arch pushing up in the colonnade,
  the cut-open pediments of classical exits
    a canter of promises not quite broken
  because made that way, mazy let-outs of style
    in designer drug options. We did
cry out, brandish our paltry money, did flaunt
      every asset we had.



Comment by Ming Tsao

I generally begin with a preexisting work – such as Schoenberg's Variations – as the
primary text for the composition. This text is then destabilized by reverse-transcribing
it through a rhythmic and metric grid that originates from a different source – such as
J. H. Prynne's poem "Triodes" – which structurally transforms the topology of
gestural materials from their shape of intent thereby placing pressure on the sounds
as they no longer are in harmony with their original expressive purposes. Throughout
this process, noise as a kind of virus is brought to the surface through an exaggeration
of instrumental actions already latent in the original Schoenberg (such as col legno
battuta, extreme bow pressure, overblowing and air sounds, multiphonics, etc.) that
is then blended with quotations from other musical sources as a way of weaving
together materials with radically different auras.



https://www.mingtsao.net/wp-content/uploads/2022/11/Tsao_Materialist_Musical_Expression.pdf


Discuss.
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Cato

A review of a new book about Schoenberg by an author named Harvey Sachs: Schoenberg, Why He Matters.


Quote

"...Mr. Sachs's "Schoenberg: Why He Matters" is a model of concision—a concentrated meditation instead of a panorama. It may be recommended for anybody with an interest in the work of the Viennese-American composer Arnold Schoenberg—and perhaps especially to those who have never quite been able to "crack" his music.

Mr. Sachs states at the outset that he is not trying to convince his readers that any vast new public awaits Schoenberg's work. To the contrary: "Now that atonality and the twelve-tone technique (and its offshoots) have been with us for a century we may safely say that they have proved to be dead ends for most listeners and for many—perhaps even most—professional performing musicians as well."

But this should not be taken as a dismissal. For a number of indisputable geniuses, the audience may not be large, but it is intelligent, passionate and devoted....



See:


Schoenberg: Why He Matters
"Meet Miss Ruth Sherwood, from Columbus, Ohio, the Middle of the Universe!"

- Brian Aherne introducing Rosalind Russell in  My Sister Eileen (1942)

ritter

Quote from: Cato on May 13, 2024, 04:38:33 AMA review of a new book about Schoenberg by an author named Harvey Sachs: Schoenberg, Why He Matters.

See:
Schoenberg: Why He Matters
I read Mr. Sach's Music in Fascist Italy last month, and am now tackling his monumental biography of Arturo Toscanini (the second one, from 2017), and they are both very weel written.

Cato

Quote from: ritter on May 13, 2024, 04:52:53 AMI read Mr. Sach's Music in Fascist Italy last month, and am now tackling his monumental biography of Arturo Toscanini (the second one, from 2017), and they are both very well written.


Yes, the book on Toscanini is mentioned as very worthwhile in the review.

Here is another review:


Quote

"...Sachs again succeeds in clarifying the composer's true intent, that despite his determination to forge his own difficult path, Schoenberg shared similar goals with his Romantic forebears: "[T]here can be no doubt that music's emotional content was of primary importance to Schoenberg!" Sachs says he believes that many musicians perceive atonal and other forms of post-tonal music as emotionally monochromatic. Ironically, Schoenberg himself did not like his music to be referred to as atonal..."





https://lareviewofbooks.org/article/misunderstood-musical-genius-on-harvey-sachss-schoenberg-2/
"Meet Miss Ruth Sherwood, from Columbus, Ohio, the Middle of the Universe!"

- Brian Aherne introducing Rosalind Russell in  My Sister Eileen (1942)

Lisztianwagner

#964
Quote from: Cato on May 13, 2024, 04:38:33 AMA review of a new book about Schoenberg by an author named Harvey Sachs: Schoenberg, Why He Matters.



See:


Schoenberg: Why He Matters
Quote from: Cato on May 13, 2024, 07:15:50 AMYes, the book on Toscanini is mentioned as very worthwhile in the review.

Here is another review:





https://lareviewofbooks.org/article/misunderstood-musical-genius-on-harvey-sachss-schoenberg-2/
Thank you for sharing this, Cato, that seems definitely an intriguing read, the discussion and analysis it gives on Schönberg's music seem fascinating! I'm currently reading Schönberg's Style and Idea, but I wouldn't mind having a look at Sachs' book too.
I think it's also interesting that Sachs tries to discuss about the reasons why the atonal and the dodecaphonic works of his repertoire are perceived by listeners as such a tough nut to crack.
"You cannot expect the Form before the Idea, for they will come into being together." - Arnold Schönberg