Pieces that have blown you away recently

Started by arpeggio, September 09, 2016, 02:36:58 PM

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Cato

Quote from: Symphonic Addict on November 12, 2022, 07:28:16 AM
Schumann's Violin Concerto? For real?  :D :-\

The last time I heard it I couldn't be more disappointed by how weak and plain the music was, only the third movement had gracefulness.

No doubts the meaning of greatness is rather subjective.  ;)

Yes, I find it intriguing.   8)

"Subjective," yes, I suppose so. 

While describing "greatness" in Classical Music, keep in mind that most of the planet would find no greatness anywhere among our composers, only boredom.   :o    :(   

"Meet Miss Ruth Sherwood, from Columbus, Ohio, the Middle of the Universe!"

- Brian Aherne introducing Rosalind Russell in  My Sister Eileen (1942)

Symphonic Addict

Quote from: Cato on November 12, 2022, 08:16:36 AM
While describing "greatness" in Classical Music, keep in mind that most of the planet would find no greatness anywhere among our composers, only boredom.   :o    :(   

Their loss, I guess.  ;)
Music is life, and like it, inextinguishable.

I love the vast surface of silence; and it is my chief delight to break it.

Carl Nielsen

relm1

I've very much enjoyed the new set of complete symphonies of Austro-Hungarian composer, Franz Schmidt by Paavo Jarvi. 

https://www.deutschegrammophon.com/en/catalogue/products/franz-schmidt-complete-symphonies-paavo-jaervi-12080
 
I'll confess my awareness of the composer prior to this set was from the intermezzo to his opera Notre Dame (also in this set) and a fabulous recording of his Symphony No. 4 by Zubin Mehta/Vienna PO plus his apocalyptic oratorio, "The Book with Seven Seals".  I think very highly of each work but find them conservative given his era.  Not that that is a bad thing, just that my preference is more towards pushing the boundaries.  BUT this is such gorgeous and refined music, it demands to be heard and without consideration of when it was composed.  Symphony No. 4, arguably the most famous, sounds like symphony from Wagner so considering it was composed in 1933 during the height of serialism, it could easily belong to an era 50 or maybe 100 years earlier.  All the music in this three CD set are of very high quality, contrapuntal, elegant, refined, and traditional.  If you like Brahms and Wanger, this is for you.

Cato

Quote from: Symphonic Addict on November 12, 2022, 07:11:02 PM

Their loss, I guess.  ;)


Absolutely it is their loss!  I consider it a tragedy for such people: for some, I suppose, their ears just cannot follow Classical Music.  For others, their arrogance, their sloth, or both, prevent them from giving the music a chance.  Tragic flaws indeed!
"Meet Miss Ruth Sherwood, from Columbus, Ohio, the Middle of the Universe!"

- Brian Aherne introducing Rosalind Russell in  My Sister Eileen (1942)

Wanderer


Florestan

#2065


Ole Bull --- Violin Concerto in A major

Full of gorgeous melodies and great musical ideas, this lyrical, sentimental and life-affirming concerto is like a belcanto dramma giocoso condensed in a half-an-hour long violin concerto. It made an indelible impression on me --- it made me air-playing and foot-tapping, which is to say that while it lasted it made me happy and cheerful and forgetful of the world outside, and this in my book is great art.  8)

The other concerto on the disc is also very good and the fillers are delightful in their own right --- but this A major is really something else.

A quote from the liner notes of the other Bull disc I acquired together with this one

Bull had, in fact, never really learnt to compose. On the other hand he had, through his
performance experience, gained an intuitive feeling for how he should build up tension and
excitement in music. He saw his compositions as a means of displaying his virtuoso skills,
which no one could equal. The works existed for the benefit of his playing, and not vice versa.
The music, he believed, was a thing of the moment, to be heard and felt then and there, and
it was not something that should be dissected and analysed afterwards from an academic,
movement-by-movement standpoint
.


Amen, bror Ole, tre ganger amen!
"Art is no excuse for boring people." - Jules Renard

Symphonic Addict

Discoveries like these make me feel invigorated to not give up finding treasures. These four string quartets by the Hungarian composer Géza Frid (1904-1989) are high-caliber works. Anyone who responds to Bartók or Lajtha's style will surely enjoy these masterful pieces. Impressive stuff.

Music is life, and like it, inextinguishable.

I love the vast surface of silence; and it is my chief delight to break it.

Carl Nielsen

kyjo

Quote from: Symphonic Addict on December 01, 2022, 12:40:37 PMDiscoveries like these make me feel invigorated to not give up finding treasures. These four string quartets by the Hungarian composer Géza Frid (1904-1989) are high-caliber works. Anyone who responds to Bartók or Lajtha's style will surely enjoy these masterful pieces. Impressive stuff.



Fascinating, Cesar! Thanks for sharing.
"Music is enough for a lifetime, but a lifetime is not enough for music" - Sergei Rachmaninoff

kyjo

#2068
I'd like to thank Brian for bringing this CD to my attention, because it's an absolute stunner in all regards:




I had previously not heard a single note by Russian-Jewish composer Alexander Veprik (1899-1958, sometimes spelled Weprik) before, so I had no idea what to expect. Really, it's hard to describe this music because it doesn't really sound like anyone else (as far as fellow Jewish composers go, maybe Ben-Haim is the best comparison). It's stunningly orchestrated, full of a profusion of arresting ideas, and contains moments of tremendous excitement as well as intimate, atmospheric beauty. The idiom is tonal and approachable but never too "comfortable" - Veprik doesn't shy away from some powerfully dissonant climaxes, especially in the Two Poems. The performances and sound are superb across the board and really capture the earthy, ethnic character of the music - the BBC NOW sound like a truly world-class orchestra here! Really, I can't recommend this disc strongly enough to those who share my musical inclinations (you know who you are)! ;) Let's hear his two symphonies now, please!!

Here's a convenient "trailer" of the album on YouTube: https://youtu.be/L9bkEblUHXM
"Music is enough for a lifetime, but a lifetime is not enough for music" - Sergei Rachmaninoff

Maestro267

Kurt Atterberg's symphonies. Frankly all of them but especially Nos. 2, 3, 5 and 7. Rich in melody.

kyjo

Quote from: Maestro267 on December 05, 2022, 09:53:42 AMKurt Atterberg's symphonies. Frankly all of them but especially Nos. 2, 3, 5 and 7. Rich in melody.

Naturally, I can't help but agree! ;)  I'm glad you mentioned No. 7 - it's come in for some criticism from fellow members, but I love it!
"Music is enough for a lifetime, but a lifetime is not enough for music" - Sergei Rachmaninoff

Papy Oli

Dutilleux's first symphony is a work that keeps mesmerising me. I wouldn't mind at all hearing it live one day. :) 
Olivier