Author Topic: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)  (Read 596749 times)

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Offline JBS

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Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
« Reply #5940 on: June 07, 2020, 05:48:28 AM »
Mr Gorchakov is better known on record than might be thought.

But this is the entire Wikipedia article on him
Quote
Sergei Petrovich Gorchakov (Russian: Сергей Петрович Горчаков; 10 February 1905 – 4 July 1976) was a Russian classical music composer.[1] Gorchakov is best known for his uniquely 'Russian' orchestration of Pictures at an Exhibition by Modest Mussorgsky.

This is his entry in the list of  PAAE orchestrations
Quote
Sergei Gorchakov[25] (1954: recorded by Kurt Masur and the London Philharmonic for Teldec; Also recorded with Karl Anton Rickenbacher, conducting the Cracow Radio Symphony, for the RCA Records. A live 1980 performance by the Leningrad Academic Symphony Orchestra under Konstantin Simeonov was recorded by Melodya.)

Google did not show those recordings but did show one on Naxos and one by the Fort Worth Symphony (its own label I think).

Hollywood Beach Broadwalk

Offline Brian

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Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
« Reply #5941 on: June 07, 2020, 06:09:08 AM »
Thanks, Jeffrey. Conductor there was to be New Zealander Gemma New.
Which concerto?  Actually, doesn't matter.  That's a big loss.

I'm thinking I pass on live musical events until after I receive a vaccine, or have been infected and survived the virus.  I would prefer the former.
3.

We're vaccine waiters too.

Offline Todd

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Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
« Reply #5942 on: June 07, 2020, 06:16:21 AM »
3.


See, now I'm imagining how Abduraimov would handle the cadenza.  Other than splendidly, I mean.
The universe is change; life is opinion. - Marcus Aurelius, Meditations

Everything dies - Alien Bounty Hunter, The X-Files

Everyone dies - William Barr, United States Attorney General

Offline Brewski

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Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
« Reply #5943 on: September 04, 2020, 03:28:31 AM »
This afternoon, on the Berlin Philharmonic Digital Concert Hall. (More Rebecca Saunders coming next week.)

https://www.digitalconcerthall.com/en/concert/53506

Klangforum Wien
Emilio Pomarico

    Rebecca Saunders
    Flesh for solo accordion and recitation

    Rebecca Saunders
    Sole − Trio in F sharp for accordion, percussion and piano

    Rebecca Saunders
    to an utterance − study for solo piano (premiere)

    Joonas Ahonen piano
    Rebecca Saunders
    Scar for 15 soloists and conductor

    Georges Aperghis
    Der Lauf des Lebens (The Way of Life) for 6 voices and ensemble (premiere) – commissioned by Musik der Jahrhunderte Stuttgart and Klangforum Wien, funded by Ernst von Siemens Musikstiftung

    Neue Vocalsolisten Stuttgart

--Bruce
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Offline Mandryka

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Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
« Reply #5944 on: September 04, 2020, 03:31:26 AM »
Thanks, Jeffrey. Conductor there was to be New Zealander Gemma New.3.

We're vaccine waiters too.

You may well have a very long wait.
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Offline knight66

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Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
« Reply #5945 on: September 04, 2020, 04:14:56 AM »
On Tuesday we go 40 miles from Edinburgh to Glasgow. We have tickets for La Boheme performed by Scottish Opera: in their car park.

It is cut down in duration and orchestrally. We wear masks. Not quite La Scala, but I wanted to be at some live music making and to support Scottish Opera. So, car park, September, Scotland = Loden coat and scarf. We sit in isolated groups per booking. I am looking forward to it. It is bound to be memorable.

Mike
DavidW: Yeah Mike doesn't get angry, he gets even.
I wasted time: and time wasted me.

Offline André

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Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
« Reply #5946 on: September 04, 2020, 12:44:20 PM »
On Tuesday we go 40 miles from Edinburgh to Glasgow. We have tickets for La Boheme performed by Scottish Opera: in their car park.

It is cut down in duration and orchestrally. We wear masks. Not quite La Scala, but I wanted to be at some live music making and to support Scottish Opera. So, car park, September, Scotland = Loden coat and scarf. We sit in isolated groups per booking. I am looking forward to it. It is bound to be memorable.

Mike

That’s the spirit !  ;D

Offline André

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Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
« Reply #5947 on: September 04, 2020, 01:01:47 PM »
I totally forgot I had reserved tickets for the Orchestre Métropolitain’s next season. Some concerts have been canceled and whatever remained has been modified in one way or another. Today I received notice I was to attend 2 concerts in the Fall. Not sure that ex-Covid I would have bought/attended these particular programs (all new), but in the circumstances I figured what the heck! Let’s encourage YNS and his band. :)

September 20:
- Fung: Prayer, for orchestra. Never heard of the composer or the work.
- Mahler: Das Lied von der Erde, in the Schoenberg/Riehn transcription (good!). Michèle Losier and Frédéric Antoun will be the soloists. I look forward to hear Antoun, a french opera specialist,  in the downsized orchestration. He won’t have to force to project his fine tenor voice. An intelligent choice.

October 16:
- Robert Nathaniel Dett: The Chariot Jubilee, a gospel oratorio from 1919 for tenor, choir and orchestra.
- Fauré: Requiem. The baritone will be the excellent Philippe Sly. The soprano is one Suzanne Taffot.

I haven’t received confirmation of my other choices, but I see that Zemlinsky’s The Little Mermaid and the Shostakovich 8th are still on the orchestra’s schedule in 2021. I’m crossing my fingers.


Offline Brian

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Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
« Reply #5948 on: September 04, 2020, 02:20:21 PM »
Is that Vivian Fung? Todd has written a few posts very enthusiastically describing her music here on GMG.

Offline André

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Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
« Reply #5949 on: September 04, 2020, 02:41:15 PM »
Is that Vivian Fung? Todd has written a few posts very enthusiastically describing her music here on GMG.

Yes, that’s her. It seems to be a short work. YNS led the world premiere a few weeks ago. Every musician played from a different location, thanks to covid 19.

It’s here:

https://www.cbc.ca/music/watch-yannick-nézet-séguin-lead-a-virtual-canadian-orchestra-in-the-world-premiere-of-vivian-fung-s-prayer-1.5604307

Offline knight66

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Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
« Reply #5950 on: September 08, 2020, 10:05:52 PM »
On Tuesday we go 40 miles from Edinburgh to Glasgow. We have tickets for La Boheme performed by Scottish Opera: in their car park.

It is cut down in duration and orchestrally. We wear masks. Not quite La Scala, but I wanted to be at some live music making and to support Scottish Opera. So, car park, September, Scotland = Loden coat and scarf. We sit in isolated groups per booking. I am looking forward to it. It is bound to be memorable.

Mike

La Boheme in a carpark worked well, though strong winds did do their best to disrupt the performance, we just wrapped up and enjoyed the oddness of it all. Very, very good voices and acting. The orchestra played from inside the building, but with a partly open side we could see them. The performance was somewhat in the round, but mainly concentrated on the flatbeds of a couple of Scottish Opera trucks. The singers were distanced from one another and the idea of love in time of plague was very much present, but not overplayed.

The cut down aspect was there being no chorus. The professional chorus acted as front of house staff, checking tickets and temperatures of everyone, seeing people to their seats etc. Very generous of them. One said to me that she just wanted to be somehow involved.

We were a masked audience of 115, spread widely across the carpark and grouped distantly from one another set out cabaret style. The venue is close to a motorway, but the constant sound of the traffic seemed to disappear once the music started. They obviously had to use amplification, which was very effective. The awning was clear plastic sheeting stretched over a huge metal framework. The wind did its work and the sheeting flapped loudly in the heavy gusts.

It is not how I want to see opera in a regular way and with winter coming together with a second wave, it may be the only opera we see live this year. We enjoyed it, the performers all did exceptionally well. It may well give food for thought for the Company next year.

It has a run of five performances, I don’t see how the ticket money can have covered costs, but the major newspapers have attended and they have received five star reviews, it keeps Scottish Opera on the cultural map and that is valuable right now.

Mike
« Last Edit: September 08, 2020, 10:08:32 PM by knight66 »
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Offline Brewski

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Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
« Reply #5951 on: September 09, 2020, 06:09:49 AM »
La Boheme in a carpark worked well, though strong winds did do their best to disrupt the performance, we just wrapped up and enjoyed the oddness of it all. Very, very good voices and acting. The orchestra played from inside the building, but with a partly open side we could see them. The performance was somewhat in the round, but mainly concentrated on the flatbeds of a couple of Scottish Opera trucks. The singers were distanced from one another and the idea of love in time of plague was very much present, but not overplayed.

The cut down aspect was there being no chorus. The professional chorus acted as front of house staff, checking tickets and temperatures of everyone, seeing people to their seats etc. Very generous of them. One said to me that she just wanted to be somehow involved.

We were a masked audience of 115, spread widely across the carpark and grouped distantly from one another set out cabaret style. The venue is close to a motorway, but the constant sound of the traffic seemed to disappear once the music started. They obviously had to use amplification, which was very effective. The awning was clear plastic sheeting stretched over a huge metal framework. The wind did its work and the sheeting flapped loudly in the heavy gusts.

It is not how I want to see opera in a regular way and with winter coming together with a second wave, it may be the only opera we see live this year. We enjoyed it, the performers all did exceptionally well. It may well give food for thought for the Company next year.

It has a run of five performances, I don’t see how the ticket money can have covered costs, but the major newspapers have attended and they have received five star reviews, it keeps Scottish Opera on the cultural map and that is valuable right now.

Mike

This sounds fascinating. From my limited experience with taking opera onsite (outside concert halls), it's a welcome phenomenon.  (Granted, in inclement weather, not so much.) Glad to see the company thinking creatively.

--Bruce
"Do you realize that we're meteorites; almost as soon as we're born, we have to disappear?"

~Iannis Xenakis

Twitter: @BruceHodgesNY

Offline Brewski

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Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
« Reply #5952 on: September 09, 2020, 06:11:30 AM »
In about 2 hours, more Rebecca Saunders, this time with Ensemble Musikfabrik, live from Berlin:

https://www.digitalconcerthall.com/en/concert/53500

So far, the concerts in the last few days have been outstanding.

--Bruce
"Do you realize that we're meteorites; almost as soon as we're born, we have to disappear?"

~Iannis Xenakis

Twitter: @BruceHodgesNY

Offline Brewski

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Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
« Reply #5953 on: September 09, 2020, 04:38:26 PM »
On September 22, the last in this series, with works by Saunders, Enno Poppe, and Milica Djordjević.

https://www.digitalconcerthall.com/en/concert/53188

SCHOLARS OF THE KARAJAN ACADEMY
ENNO POPPE

Anna Maria Filochowska, Markus Mayr, Alexander Arai-Swale

Rebecca Saunders
Cinnabar, Double concerto for violin and trumpet, ensemble and 11 music boxes
Anna Maria Filochowska violin, Markus Mayr trumpet

Rebecca Saunders
Fury for double bass solo
Alexander Arai-Swale double bass

Milica Djordjević
New Work commissioned by the Karajan Academy of the Berliner Philharmoniker Premiere

Enno Poppe
Koffer for large ensemble

--Bruce
"Do you realize that we're meteorites; almost as soon as we're born, we have to disappear?"

~Iannis Xenakis

Twitter: @BruceHodgesNY

Offline Brewski

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Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
« Reply #5954 on: September 11, 2020, 10:43:38 AM »
Looking forward to this in November:

Detroit Symphony Orchestra
Jennifer Koh, violin
Christian Reif, conductor

Florence Price: Five Folksongs in Counterpoint
Tyshawn Sorey: For Marcos Balter for violin and Orchestra

Interest in Price's work has recently increased, and Sorey is one of the most interesting younger composers around. (He was awarded a MacArthur Fellowship a few years ago.) And though I don't know the work of Christian Reif, I'd hear Jennifer Koh play most anything.

Like many orchestras, the DSO has responded to the pandemic with an array of livestreamed events. This one has a ticket price of just $12.

https://www.dso.org/events-and-tickets/events/2021-digital/jennifer-koh-plays-tyshawn-sorey

--Bruce
"Do you realize that we're meteorites; almost as soon as we're born, we have to disappear?"

~Iannis Xenakis

Twitter: @BruceHodgesNY

Offline André

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Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
« Reply #5955 on: September 20, 2020, 04:48:05 PM »
Today at the Orchestre métropolitain’s first outing for this season, Yannick Nézet-Séguin conducted Vivian Fung’s Prayer and Mahler’s Das Lied von der Erde in the Schönberg/Riehn transcription.

Interestingly, the Fung work directly influenced the presentation of the OM’s DLVDE. Fung was commissioned to write a short orchestra work to be played by 36 musicians from 28 canadian orchestras, all of them in their own space (studio or orchestra hall) and conducted at a distance by YNS. It had its online premiere just a few days ago. Playing the work on stage today were 36 members of the OM. After Prayer all 36 of them played the Schönberg/Riehn arrangement, which was originally scored for just 14 players. What we had then was an expansion of Schönberg’s reduction !

Here’s Schönberg’s intended orchestration (he only completed the first song, Riehn did the others with Schönberg’s intended instrumentarium:

- flute (+picc)
- oboe (+c.a)
- clarinet in Bb (+cl(Eb), bass cl(Bb))
- bassoon
- horn in F
- percussion(2): glockenspiel, triangle, cymbals, tam-tam, tambourine, snare drum, bass drum
- harmonium (+cel)
- piano
- 1st violin(1)
- 2nd violin(1)
- viola(1)
- violoncello(1)
- contrabass(1)

All of the above were kept, horns were doubled and strings were beefed up from 5 to some 20 players. The resulting sound was very satisfactory for a regular-sized concert hall. Lucid textures, transparent sound with clear and biting string attacks when necessary. The only thing I really missed were the cascading trombones and tuba in the 5th song. Both soloists were able to interpret the lyrics (not just sing the notes) thanks to the reduced orchestration and Nézet-Séguin’s attentive conducting. Vocally, mezzo Michèle Losier was truly outstanding. NS was clearly in love with the work in this particular arrangement. When the ‘ewigs’ started in the Abschied the lights slowly dimmed until the stage was in semi-darkness by the last chord. Magical.


Offline Brewski

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Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
« Reply #5956 on: September 22, 2020, 08:16:46 AM »
Today at the Orchestre métropolitain’s first outing for this season, Yannick Nézet-Séguin conducted Vivian Fung’s Prayer and Mahler’s Das Lied von der Erde in the Schönberg/Riehn transcription.

Interestingly, the Fung work directly influenced the presentation of the OM’s DLVDE. Fung was commissioned to write a short orchestra work to be played by 36 musicians from 28 canadian orchestras, all of them in their own space (studio or orchestra hall) and conducted at a distance by YNS. It had its online premiere just a few days ago. Playing the work on stage today were 36 members of the OM. After Prayer all 36 of them played the Schönberg/Riehn arrangement, which was originally scored for just 14 players. What we had then was an expansion of Schönberg’s reduction !

Here’s Schönberg’s intended orchestration (he only completed the first song, Riehn did the others with Schönberg’s intended instrumentarium:

- flute (+picc)
- oboe (+c.a)
- clarinet in Bb (+cl(Eb), bass cl(Bb))
- bassoon
- horn in F
- percussion(2): glockenspiel, triangle, cymbals, tam-tam, tambourine, snare drum, bass drum
- harmonium (+cel)
- piano
- 1st violin(1)
- 2nd violin(1)
- viola(1)
- violoncello(1)
- contrabass(1)

All of the above were kept, horns were doubled and strings were beefed up from 5 to some 20 players. The resulting sound was very satisfactory for a regular-sized concert hall. Lucid textures, transparent sound with clear and biting string attacks when necessary. The only thing I really missed were the cascading trombones and tuba in the 5th song. Both soloists were able to interpret the lyrics (not just sing the notes) thanks to the reduced orchestration and Nézet-Séguin’s attentive conducting. Vocally, mezzo Michèle Losier was truly outstanding. NS was clearly in love with the work in this particular arrangement. When the ‘ewigs’ started in the Abschied the lights slowly dimmed until the stage was in semi-darkness by the last chord. Magical.

Loved reading this, thank you.

--Bruce
"Do you realize that we're meteorites; almost as soon as we're born, we have to disappear?"

~Iannis Xenakis

Twitter: @BruceHodgesNY

Offline Brewski

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Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
« Reply #5957 on: September 22, 2020, 08:18:39 AM »
On September 22, the last in this series, with works by Saunders, Enno Poppe, and Milica Djordjević.

https://www.digitalconcerthall.com/en/concert/53188

SCHOLARS OF THE KARAJAN ACADEMY
ENNO POPPE

Anna Maria Filochowska, Markus Mayr, Alexander Arai-Swale

Rebecca Saunders
Cinnabar, Double concerto for violin and trumpet, ensemble and 11 music boxes
Anna Maria Filochowska violin, Markus Mayr trumpet

Rebecca Saunders
Fury for double bass solo
Alexander Arai-Swale double bass

Milica Djordjević
New Work commissioned by the Karajan Academy of the Berliner Philharmoniker Premiere

Enno Poppe
Koffer for large ensemble

--Bruce

Looking forward to this in about 30 minutes, especially the concluding Poppe work.

--Bruce
"Do you realize that we're meteorites; almost as soon as we're born, we have to disappear?"

~Iannis Xenakis

Twitter: @BruceHodgesNY

Offline Brewski

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Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
« Reply #5958 on: September 26, 2020, 11:55:52 AM »
In about three hours (8:00 PM EDT), opening night of the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra, an hour-long concert, livestreamed on their website and social channels. Just saw Angel Blue in Porgy and Bess at the Met, and thought she was terrific. She should be great in the Barber.

Louis Langrée, conductor
Angel Blue, soprano
Catalyst Quartet

JESSIE MONTGOMERY: Banner
BARBER: Knoxville: Summer of 1915
COPLAND: Suite from Appalachian Spring

--Bruce
"Do you realize that we're meteorites; almost as soon as we're born, we have to disappear?"

~Iannis Xenakis

Twitter: @BruceHodgesNY

Offline Brewski

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Psappha Ensemble, live at 2pm (EDT)
« Reply #5959 on: October 01, 2020, 08:16:22 AM »
In about a half-hour, this great-looking concert from the Psappha Ensemble, based in Manchester:

Anna Thorvaldsdottir - Spectra (UK premiere)
Alex Ho - Shout! (World premiere)
Jeffrey Mumford - eight aspects of appreciation II (UK premiere)
Schnittke - String Trio

https://youtu.be/nRnw4O-q87I

--Bruce
"Do you realize that we're meteorites; almost as soon as we're born, we have to disappear?"

~Iannis Xenakis

Twitter: @BruceHodgesNY