Author Topic: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)  (Read 770538 times)

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Offline Brewski

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Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
« Reply #6420 on: September 06, 2022, 09:43:01 AM »
On Thursday at noon (EDT, 7:00pm Helsinki time), this enticing offering from the Helsinki Philharmonic Orchestra. PS, they are livestreaming many of their concerts this fall and into the spring of 2023.

R. STRAUSS: Metamorphosen
WAGNER: Tristan and Isolde, Act II

SUSANNA MÄLKKI: conductor
Helsinki Philharmonic Orchestra

STUART SKELTON: Tristan, tenor
LISE LINDSTROM: Isolde, soprano
JENNY CARLSTEDT: Brangäne, mezzo-soprano
MARKUS NIEMINEN: Kurwenal, baritone
BRINDLEY SHERRATT: King Marke, baritone
ROLAND LIIV: Melot, tenor

https://www.helsinkikanava.fi/en/web/helsinkikanava/player/event/home?eventId=190585775

--Bruce
“I set down a beautiful chord on paper—and suddenly it rusts.”

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Offline Brewski

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Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
« Reply #6421 on: September 07, 2022, 10:26:30 AM »
Some concerts on medici.tv in the next few days that look promising. I've only highlighted ones available to anyone (with free registration). The site has many more offerings for subscribers. The Mäkelä program tomorrow looks wild.

8 September
Orchestre de Paris
Klaus Mäkelä — Conductor
Saariaho - Asteroid 4179: Toutatis
R. Strauss - Also sprach Zarathustra, Op. 30
Jimmy López - Aino
Dusapin - A Linea
Scriabin - Poem of Ecstasy

10 September
2022 Tsinandali Festival in Georgia
Vilde Frang — Violinist
Kian Soltani — Cellist
Julien Quentin — Pianist
Ravel - Trio for Piano, Violin and Cello in A minor
Mendelssohn - Trio for Piano, Violin and Cello No. 2 in C Minor, Op. 66

11 September
2022 Tsinandali Festival in Georgia
Vilde Frang — Violinist
The Pan-Caucasian Youth Orchestra
Vasily Petrenko — Conductor
Shostakovich - Violin Concerto No. 1
Prokofiev - Symphony No. 5

--Bruce
“I set down a beautiful chord on paper—and suddenly it rusts.”

- Alfred Schnittke

Twitter: @BruceHodgesNY

Offline ritter

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Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
« Reply #6422 on: September 08, 2022, 05:42:09 AM »
Just bought a ticket for a concert performance of Felipe Pedrell's opera La Celestina, tomorrow evening at the Teatro de la Zarzuela here in Madrid.

Pedrell (1841-1922) is widely considered the "father of modern Spanish music", and he was a teacher of (among others) Granados, Albéniz, Turina and Falla. His music is seldom performed (not to mention recorded) nowadays, but his name may ring a bell to fans of Falla (a movement of his orchestral suite Homenajes is tilted Pedrelliana) or of Roberto Gerhard (who wrote a Sinfonía, "Homenaje a Pedrell, the last movement of which --again titled Pedrelliana-- is also a standalone piece).

La Celestina, in four acts to a libretto adapted by the composer from Francisco de Rojas' Tragicomedia de Calisto y Melibea (an undisputed classic of late 15th century Spanish literature) was composed in 1902, but apparently has never been performed complete. Casals performed excerpts in 1921 in a concert in homage to Pedrell, and at the beginning of this a century some scenes were conducted in Barcelona by Antoni Ros Marbà and released on CD. I have that CD, and it has some stunning passages.

The work is thought to be part of Pedrell's attempts to establish a "national Spanish operatic style" (as opposed to zarzuela), and is bound to be interesting at least.

Guillermo García Calvo will conduct the Orquesta de la Comunidad de Madrid, and the roster of soloists includes some established names of the Spanish operatic scene, such as mezzo Maite Beaumont, baritone Juan Jesús Rodríguez, and bass Simón Orfila.

« Last Edit: September 08, 2022, 11:27:29 AM by ritter »
ritter
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Offline Brewski

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Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
« Reply #6423 on: September 08, 2022, 06:26:25 PM »
Just bought a ticket for a concert performance of Felipe Pedrell's opera La Celestina, tomorrow evening at the Teatro de la Zarzuela here in Madrid.

Pedrell (1841-1922) is widely considered the "father of modern Spanish music", and he was a teacher of (among others) Granados, Albéniz, Turina and Falla. His music is seldom performed (not to mention recorded) nowadays, but his name may ring a bell to fans of Falla (a movement of his orchestral suite Homenajes is tilted Pedrelliana) or of Roberto Gerhard (who wrote a Sinfonía, "Homenaje a Pedrell, the last movement of which --again titled Pedrelliana-- is also a standalone piece).

La Celestina, in four acts to a libretto adapted by the composer from Francisco de Rojas' Tragicomedia de Calisto y Melibea (an undisputed classic of late 15th century Spanish literature) was composed in 1902, but apparently has never been performed complete. Casals performed excerpts in 1921 in a concert in homage to Pedrell, and at the beginning of this a century some scenes were conducted in Barcelona by Antoni Ros Marbà and released on CD. I have that CD, and it has some stunning passages.

The work is thought to be part of Pedrell's attempts to establish a "national Spanish operatic style" (as opposed to zarzuela), and is bound to be interesting at least.

Guillermo García Calvo will conduct the Orquesta de la Comunidad de Madrid, and the roster of soloists includes some established names of the Spanish operatic scene, such as mezzo Maite Beaumont, baritone Juan Jesús Rodríguez, and bass Simón Orfila.

Do not know Pedrell at all, but he certainly has some impressive students! (Said as a fan of pretty much all of them.) Sounds like an unusual evening, so good for you, for taking the plunge.

--Bruce
“I set down a beautiful chord on paper—and suddenly it rusts.”

- Alfred Schnittke

Twitter: @BruceHodgesNY

Offline Brewski

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Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
« Reply #6424 on: September 08, 2022, 06:30:31 PM »
Next week, the Momenta Quartet marks Mexican Independence Day with this program by Carrillo, a microtonal pioneer.

Julián Carrillo: String Quartet No. 5 (1937)
​Julián Carrillo: String Quartet No. 11 (1962)

The other three programs look great, too, each curated by a different member of the quartet.

https://www.momentaquartet.com/home/momenta-festival-vii-september-15-18-2022

--Bruce
“I set down a beautiful chord on paper—and suddenly it rusts.”

- Alfred Schnittke

Twitter: @BruceHodgesNY

Offline pjme

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Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
« Reply #6425 on: September 08, 2022, 10:10:09 PM »
Also in De Doelen / Rotterdam:
After the second symphony (apparently also a success in the Berliner Philharmonie) , Pijpers 5 string quartets will be performed by the Matangi quartet as a "theatrical concert".

Pijper strijkkwartet nr. 1 - 5
credits
Matangi Kwartet | Viride Kwartet | Robin Coops regie en performance | Maze de Boer scenografie |  Wout van Tongeren dramaturgie

and on september 17th  Digital Concert hall:
Berliner Philharmoniker
Kirill Petrenko Dirigent
Wolfgang Koch Bariton (Il prigioniero)
Ekaterina Semenchuk Mezzosopran (La madre)
Wolfgang Ablinger-Sperrhacke Tenor (Il carceriere, Il grande Inquisitore)
Caspar Singh Tenor (Erster sacerdote)
Oliver Boyd Bariton (Zweiter sacerdote)
Rundfunkchor Berlin

Iannis Xenakis
Empreintes

Bernd Alois Zimmermann
Sinfonie in einem Satz (2. Fassung von 1953)

Luigi Dallapiccola
Il prigioniero (Der Gefangene), Oper in einem Prolog und einem Akt (konzertante Aufführung)

Offline Brian

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Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
« Reply #6426 on: September 10, 2022, 07:51:31 PM »
Tomorrow we're going to the free Sunday afternoon concert at an American musical institution, the Spreckels outdoor concert organ pavilion in Balboa Park, San Diego. Apparently the world's largest outdoor pipe organ - I can't imagine there are many competitors - it presents a free hour of music every week.

The programming is overtly populist, but tomorrow Bach's Toccata in A minor BWV 561, two Saint-Saens pieces, and a work by Buxtehude share the program with...well... Bohemian Rhapsody and Imagine. I'm thinking we'll leave before Imagine starts.

Offline ritter

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Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
« Reply #6427 on: September 11, 2022, 07:17:58 AM »
Just bought a ticket for a concert performance of Felipe Pedrell's opera La Celestina, tomorrow evening at the Teatro de la Zarzuela here in Madrid.

Pedrell (1841-1922) is widely considered the "father of modern Spanish music", and he was a teacher of (among others) Granados, Albéniz, Turina and Falla. His music is seldom performed (not to mention recorded) nowadays, but his name may ring a bell to fans of Falla (a movement of his orchestral suite Homenajes is tilted Pedrelliana) or of Roberto Gerhard (who wrote a Sinfonía, "Homenaje a Pedrell, the last movement of which --again titled Pedrelliana-- is also a standalone piece).

La Celestina, in four acts to a libretto adapted by the composer from Francisco de Rojas' Tragicomedia de Calisto y Melibea (an undisputed classic of late 15th century Spanish literature) was composed in 1902, but apparently has never been performed complete. Casals performed excerpts in 1921 in a concert in homage to Pedrell, and at the beginning of this a century some scenes were conducted in Barcelona by Antoni Ros Marbà and released on CD. I have that CD, and it has some stunning passages.

The work is thought to be part of Pedrell's attempts to establish a "national Spanish operatic style" (as opposed to zarzuela), and is bound to be interesting at least.

Guillermo García Calvo will conduct the Orquesta de la Comunidad de Madrid, and the roster of soloists includes some established names of the Spanish operatic scene, such as mezzo Maite Beaumont, baritone Juan Jesús Rodríguez, and bass Simón Orfila.
Well, despite its historic significance, the performance of Pedrell’s La Celestina on Friday evening was a disappointment.

The opera has some great moments, such as the opening chorus —used by both Falla and Gerhard in their musical homages to Pedrell—, parts of the long duet between Celestina and Melibea in Act II, the dinner party at Celestina’s house —and her subsequent murder— in Act III, and Melibea’s suicide in Act IV, accompanied by a chorus a bocca chiusa —and let us not forget that this work was composed two years before the first performance and publication of Puccini’s Madama Butterfly—. But, the vocal writing is ungrateful and clumsy, and the setting of the classic text is too literal and handled in such a way that it was unintelligible most of the time (imagine the pandemonium of some  segments of Die Meistersinger going on for very long stretches, but without the humour or the musical riches). Thus, dramatically, the opera does not work at all (perhaps a staging might help in that respect). On the plus side, the heavy, Wagnerian orchestration had some beautiful moments, and Pedrell’s incorporating of some popular rhythms (e.g. a jota and a zortziko in the aforementioned dinner scene) showed the distinguished musicologist he was.

The performance was fine, with the female leads and the low male voices doing an excellent job. The tenor lead, though, gave what is possibly the worst performance I have ever  encountered from a professional singer. Granted, the tessitura and veristic vocal writing of the score are devilish, but in the first two acts he sang everything in an unnuanced, steady forte that made his interventions painful to the listener (and all the time with his arms crossed across his chest, something that was even highlighted by some critics in the newspapers today, and that I at least don’t recall having seen before). After the intermission, he had lost his voice almost completely, and would only sing a phrase here and phrase there, turning some duets into monologues of the soprano.

Conductor Guillermo García Calvo (who can only be commended for this exhumation) could have controlled the dynamics of the orchestra a bit more thoughtfully.

So, it took 120 years for La Celestina to be performed, and I doubt it’ll be performed again in the next 120 years!
« Last Edit: September 11, 2022, 12:07:55 PM by ritter »
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Offline TheGSMoeller

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Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
« Reply #6428 on: September 18, 2022, 05:49:24 AM »
I attended this last night which is the opening subscription weekend for Nashville Symphony. It featured an all female composer program including the world premiere of Wolfe's Her Story which was also recorded for a future CD release. Easily the best overall experience I've had at the NSO in the five years I've been attending their concerts. The important significance of the programming was a powerful highlight, with Guerrero even speaking about this significance a bit at the beginning of the concert. Wolfe's Her Story was as much of an visual art performance as it was musical, with the Lorelei Ensemble moving to different spots of the balcony and stage, changing outfits and holding up signs. At times the members of the orchestra even stood pointing at the singers while calling them "communists". These are the kind of concerts that inspire me, and the energetic crowd seemed to be as well giving Wolfe who was in attendance what felt like a ten minute ovation afterwards. 

Nashville Symphony / Giancarlo Guerrero - conductor
Karen Walwyn - piano
Lorelei Ensemble - -vocal ensemble

Joan Tower: 1920/2019
Florence Price: Piano Concerto in One Movement

-Intermission-

Julia Wolfe: Her Story
World Premiere



Offline absolutelybaching

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Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
« Reply #6429 on: September 22, 2022, 10:22:32 PM »
Not sure it counts, but it's now confirmed that on October 9th, the closest Sunday to October 12th, we're off to Down Ampney church for the 3pm service to celebrate the 150th birthday of one Ralph Vaughan Williams. Apparently, all the hymns will be RVW's, plus the G minor mass: https://www.ampneychurches.info/events-in-2022

Anyone else planning to attend?
It is cruel, you know, that music should be so beautiful. (Benjamin Britten)

Offline ultralinear

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Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
« Reply #6430 on: September 23, 2022, 02:28:24 AM »
Alas no. :(

Thanks to a national rail strike, it looks like I won't get to this:

Wednesday 5th October - Barbican, London

Sergei Rachmaninov Piano Concerto No 2 in C Minor
Sophie Lacaze Sighs of Stars (BBC co-commission, world premiere)
Sergei Prokofiev Suite No 1 from Cinderella

BBC Symphony Orchestra
Sakari Oramo conductor
Boris Giltburg piano

So I have booked for this:

Sunday 9th October - Laeiszhalle, Hamburg

Richard Strauss Vier letzte Lieder
Mieczysław Weinberg Sinfonie Nr. 21 op. 152 »Kaddish«

Symphoniker Hamburg
Jacek Kaspszyk conductor
Sarah Wegener soprano

Offline absolutelybaching

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Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
« Reply #6431 on: September 23, 2022, 06:21:05 AM »
Alas no. :(

[...]

So I have booked for this:

Sunday 9th October - Laeiszhalle, Hamburg

Richard Strauss Vier letzte Lieder
Mieczysław Weinberg Sinfonie Nr. 21 op. 152 »Kaddish«

Symphoniker Hamburg
Jacek Kaspszyk conductor
Sarah Wegener soprano

To be fair, that sounds like quite a decent trade-off! I've never heard the VLL live: I think that might be quite something :)
It is cruel, you know, that music should be so beautiful. (Benjamin Britten)

Offline Brian

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Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
« Reply #6432 on: September 23, 2022, 11:34:17 AM »
This Sunday

CHERRY RHODES organ of Meyerson Symphony Hall, Dallas

BACH Präludium und Fuge e-moll
WILLIAM GRANT STILL Reverie
JEAN GUILLOU Ballade Ossianique No. 2, “Les chants de Selma”
FR. JOSEPH WALTER Chorale, Diferencias, & Glosas on Puer Natus in Bethlehem
LOUIS VIERNE Pièces de fantasie, Suite No. 2, “Clair de lune”
MAX REGER Fantasie und Fuge d-moll

Father Joseph Walter is a priest in Fredonia, New York who studied composition with Morton Feldman. Cherry Rhodes premiered this work in 2016 and, according to articles I've read online, it contains a cadenza for feet alone.