What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)

Started by Siedler, April 20, 2007, 05:34:10 PM

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Brian

Quote from: brewski on February 02, 2023, 02:35:25 PMTomorrow night, conductor Carlos Miguel Prieto, pianist/composer Gabriela Montero, and the Minnesota Orchestra:

Ravel: Rapsodie espagnole
Montero: Piano Concerto No. 1, Latin
Chávez: Symphony No. 2, Sinfonía India
Falla: Suite from The Three-Cornered Hat

https://www.minnesotaorchestra.org/tickets/calendar/classical/rapsodie-espagnole/

-Bruce

Oh, wow, that is a cool program! And I am seeing Montero do her concerto soon as well, live in Dallas:

Gabriela Ortiz: Antrópolis (apparently this has an at least partially soloistic timpani part)
Gabriela Montero: Piano Concerto No. 1, Latin
and then, well, it's Scheherazade

with Marin Alsop. Feb. 24

I owed you a report on last week's DSO concert with Randall Goosby by the way. But it was so good I decided to go long and write a thousand words about it. Oops!  ;D  ;D

brewski

Quote from: Brian on February 02, 2023, 05:08:13 PMI owed you a report on last week's DSO concert with Randall Goosby by the way. But it was so good I decided to go long and write a thousand words about it. Oops!  ;D  ;D

"We want our ears to be pinned back."

Yessir.

(Makes me wish I had been there, and please tell me you're going to the Shostakovich.)

-Bruce
"I set down a beautiful chord on paper—and suddenly it rusts."
—Alfred Schnittke (1934-1998)

Brian

Quote from: brewski on February 02, 2023, 06:03:22 PM(Makes me wish I had been there, and please tell me you're going to the Shostakovich.)

-Bruce
I'll give it another listen at home first. Believe it or not I've only heard the piece once before. The gf would hate it but I bet I could score a single media pass. (She loves loves loves the Lutoslawski though.)

The DSCH Fourth is with Jukka-Pekka Saraste and the tiny opener is Mussorgsky's Khovanshchina prelude "Dawn on the Moscow River," one of my favorite little tidbits.

brewski

Quote from: Brian on February 02, 2023, 06:39:31 PMI'll give it another listen at home first. Believe it or not I've only heard the piece once before. The gf would hate it but I bet I could score a single media pass. (She loves loves loves the Lutoslawski though.)

The DSCH Fourth is with Jukka-Pekka Saraste and the tiny opener is Mussorgsky's Khovanshchina prelude "Dawn on the Moscow River," one of my favorite little tidbits.

The Fourth is a knockout. IIRC, in the Gergiev documentary Shostakovich Against Stalin: The War Symphonies, the composer thought that No. 4 might be his best symphony—which of course, is saying something. It's not performed nearly as often as it should be. And that Mussorgsky is tasty, too.

-Bruce
"I set down a beautiful chord on paper—and suddenly it rusts."
—Alfred Schnittke (1934-1998)

brewski

Next Saturday, Feb. 11, Daniel Harding and the Berlin Philharmonic in this excellent program on the orchestra's digital concert hall. (PS, you can try out the service free for a week. If you've never dipped in, the Berlin crew do outstanding technical work on these broadcasts.)

https://www.digitalconcerthall.com/en/concert/54501

Sibelius: The Oceanides
Ligeti: Lontano
Britten: Four Sea Interludes from Peter Grimes
Ligeti: Atmosphères
Debussy: La Mer

-Bruce
"I set down a beautiful chord on paper—and suddenly it rusts."
—Alfred Schnittke (1934-1998)

ultralinear

On Friday:

Bacewicz  Symphony No.4
Mozart  Sinfonia Concertante in E-flat major for Violin and Viola
Szymanowski  Symphony No.3 "Song of the Night"

BBC Symphony Orchestra
Sakari Oramo  conductor
Johan Dalene  violin
Timothy Ridout  viola

Broadcast here.

brewski

Quote from: ultralinear on February 06, 2023, 04:12:48 AMOn Friday:

Bacewicz  Symphony No.4
Mozart  Sinfonia Concertante in E-flat major for Violin and Viola
Szymanowski  Symphony No.3 "Song of the Night"

BBC Symphony Orchestra
Sakari Oramo  conductor
Johan Dalene  violin
Timothy Ridout  viola

Broadcast here.


Thanks! Making a note, going to try to tune in.

-Bruce
"I set down a beautiful chord on paper—and suddenly it rusts."
—Alfred Schnittke (1934-1998)

brewski

On Saturday, Feb. 18, conductor Matthias Pintscher is stepping in for the previously scheduled Simon Rattle, for this excellent program on the Berlin Philharmonic Digital Concert Hall (thankfully, for those of us not able to attend live). I have never heard any of these works in concert, and don't know the first two at all.

Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra
Matthias Pintscher
Amihai Grosz, viola
Makeda Monnet, soprano
Donatienne Michel-Dansac, mezzo-soprano
Berlin Radio Choir

Zimmermann: Musique pour les soupers du Roi Ubu
Martinu: Rhapsody Concerto for Viola and Orchestra
Ligeti: Requiem

https://www.digitalconcerthall.com/en/concert/54502

-Bruce
"I set down a beautiful chord on paper—and suddenly it rusts."
—Alfred Schnittke (1934-1998)

ultralinear

Quote from: brewski on February 08, 2023, 05:06:20 AMOn Saturday, Feb. 18, conductor Matthias Pintscher is stepping in for the previously scheduled Simon Rattle, for this excellent program on the Berlin Philharmonic Digital Concert Hall (thankfully, for those of us not able to attend live). I have never heard any of these works in concert, and don't know the first two at all.

Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra
Matthias Pintscher
Amihai Grosz, viola
Makeda Monnet, soprano
Donatienne Michel-Dansac, mezzo-soprano
Berlin Radio Choir

Zimmermann: Musique pour les soupers du Roi Ubu
Martinu: Rhapsody Concerto for Viola and Orchestra
Ligeti: Requiem

https://www.digitalconcerthall.com/en/concert/54502

-Bruce

Rattle conducted the Martinu in a concert featuring Shostakovich 1st Symphony that we heard in late 2021 and liked it fine. :)

Plus a live performance of the Requiem? - that's a must-listen! ;D

brewski

Quote from: ultralinear on February 08, 2023, 05:55:05 AMPlus a live performance of the Requiem? - that's a must-listen! ;D


Right?

PS, for those who may not know, you can do a free, 7-day trial of the Digital Concert Hall, which is great if there is a concert (or two) that you want to catch. The regular price for a year is not unreasonable: $16 per month, or $151 per year. (For some of us, less expensive than a trip to Berlin. 8) )

-Bruce
"I set down a beautiful chord on paper—and suddenly it rusts."
—Alfred Schnittke (1934-1998)

Todd

I'm on the fence as to whether I should attend the Emerson String Quartet farewell tour stop this summer.  They will be playing Schumann's Piano Quintet and LvB's Op 131. 

Also, Stewart Goodyear is coming to town to play his own Piano Sonata, along with Adolphus Hailstork's The Blue Bag and James Lee III's Ad Anah? (How Long?), the latter two with Anthony McGill.  This alone seems like it would make a good recording program.  The concert then switches to a performance of eleven miniatures played by the Catalyst Quartet.  The only composer I know is Joan Tower, and the youngest is Paul Mekailian, born in 1998.
The universe is change; life is opinion. - Marcus Aurelius, Meditations

People would rather believe than know - E.O. Wilson

Propaganda death ensemble - Tom Araya

Ganondorf

#6571
Reporting back from yesterday's Turandot. Highly mixed feelings, leaning towards negative.

For starters, another anxiety attack at opera! What else is new?  ::) Thankfully it only lasted for roughly first 20 minutes of the opera.

The singer of Calaf was, at least vocally, awful. His sound constantly kept drowning under the orchestra sound. Turandot's singer was better but not brilliant, the same goes for Liú. These two were the strongest ones (unless one counts the chorus as a character which was decent). Timur didn't make much of an impression. Ping Pang and Pong acted well enough but unfortunately I found their voices rather bland. I was disappointed by conducting of Hannu Lintu and his orchestra which is sad since he was well with Die Walküre and is going to conduct Siegfried in March to where I have tickets also. The orchestra messed up almost all the greatest parts.

General comments about the opera: Is it just me or are those riddles presented by Turandot ridiculously easy? Are we really supposed to believe that according to P-trio countless suitors have already lost their heads to these juvenile enigmas?

Another comment: Calaf and Turandot are jerkasses. Calaf has an unhealthy, all-consuming obsession with Turandot which leads him, among other things, into maliciously gloating in act 3 how the entire city will perish if they won't find out his name. Granted, if Calaf told his name, HE would die but that gloating still seems unnecessarily nasty.

Oh, and I see why Puccini found it impossible to compose Turandot's last scene. Making Turandot suddenly change her ways and expecting Calaf to be considered worthy of sympathy after continuing with his obsession even after Liü's death was an impossible task and certainly Alfano was not up to it. His music, unlike Puccini's lacks punch.

A great opera on the whole, beforementioned dramaturgical shortcomings notwithstanding (plus blatant racism) but a rather awful performance.

Florestan

Quote from: Ganondorf on February 09, 2023, 09:06:52 AMReporting back from yesterday's Turandot. Highly mixed feelings, leaning towards negative.

For starters, another anxiety attack at opera! What else is new?  ::) Thankfully it only lasted for roughly first 20 minutes of the opera.

The singer of Calaf was, at least vocally, awful. His sound constantly kept drowning under the orchestra sound. Turandot's singer was better but not brilliant, the same goes for Liú. These two were the strongest ones (unless one counts the chorus as a character which was decent). Timur didn't make much of an impression. Ping Pang and Pong acted well enough but unfortunately I found their voices rather bland. I was disappointed by conducting of Hannu Lintu and his orchestra which is sad since he was well with Die Walküre and is going to conduct Siegfried in March to where I have tickets also. The orchestra messed up almost all the greatest parts.

General comments about the opera: Is it just me or are those riddles presented by Turandot ridiculously easy? Are we really supposed to believe that according to P-trio countless suitors have already lost their heads to these juvenile enigmas?

Another comment: Calaf and Turandot are jerkasses. Calaf has an unhealthy, all-consuming obsession with Turandot which leads him, among other things, into maliciously gloating in act 3 how the entire city will perish if they won't find out his name. Granted, if Calaf told his name, HE would die but that gloating still seems unecessarily nasty.

Oh, and I see why Puccini found it impossible to compose Turandot's last scene. Making Turandot suddenly change her ways and expecting Calaf to be considered worthy of sympathy after continuing with his obsession even after Liü's death was an impossible task and certainly Alfano was not up to it. His music, unlike Puccini's lacks punch.

A great opera on the whole, beforementioned dramaturgical shortcomings notwithstanding (plus blatant racism) but a rather awful performance.

But such glorious music...

What I dream of is an art of balance, of purity and serenity devoid of troubling or depressing subject matter - a soothing, calming influence on the mind, rather like a good armchair which provides relaxation from physical fatigue. - Henri Matisse


Florestan

Quote from: Ganondorf on February 09, 2023, 09:41:24 AMAgreed.  :)

I am a Prima la musica, poi le parole guy. The only operas I know in which there is a clear and obvious connection between music and libretto all throughout are Mozart's and Carmen. In all others, suspension of belief is required, either partially or wholly --- Wagner's musical dramas being amongst the worst culprits. I mean, a guy who has just been stabbed to death singing for half an hour, give me a break!  ;D

Plus, Wagner is doubly at fault: stupid libretto and boring music. Ughhh...  ;D
What I dream of is an art of balance, of purity and serenity devoid of troubling or depressing subject matter - a soothing, calming influence on the mind, rather like a good armchair which provides relaxation from physical fatigue. - Henri Matisse

ritter

Quote from: Florestan on February 09, 2023, 10:04:27 AMI am a Prima la musica, poi le parole guy. The only operas I know in which there is a clear and obvious connection between music and libretto all throughout are Mozart's and Carmen . In all others, suspension of belief is required, either partially or wholly --- Wagner's musical dramas being amongst the worst culprits. I mean, a guy who has just been stabbed to death singing for half an hour, give me a break!  ;D

Plus, Wagner is doubly at fault: stupid libretto and boring music. Ughhh...  ;D
O ciel, che noia!  ::)  :D

Good evening, Andrei!
ritter
-------------------------------------------------------------
« ...tout cela qui prend forme et solidité, est sorti, ville et jardins, de ma tasse de thé. »

Florestan

What I dream of is an art of balance, of purity and serenity devoid of troubling or depressing subject matter - a soothing, calming influence on the mind, rather like a good armchair which provides relaxation from physical fatigue. - Henri Matisse

Ganondorf

I guess we'll have to agree to disagree. For what it's worth, some major writers have acknowledged Wagner's literary talents.

"It has always seemed to me absurd to question Wagner's poetic gifts." - Thomas Mann

Florestan

Quote from: Ganondorf on February 09, 2023, 10:44:18 AMI guess we'll have to agree to disagree. For what it's worth, some major writers have acknowledged Wagner's literary talents.

"It has always seemed to me absurd to question Wagner's poetic gifts." - Thomas Mann

I will counter this with Schopenhauer, of all people. He penned very acid and bitter remarks on Wagner's libretto for the Ring Tetralogy, going so far as to label him "the deaf musician", and he vastly preferred Mozart and Rossini to Wagner.

https://www.wagnersite.nl/Schopenhauer/Arthur.htm


What I dream of is an art of balance, of purity and serenity devoid of troubling or depressing subject matter - a soothing, calming influence on the mind, rather like a good armchair which provides relaxation from physical fatigue. - Henri Matisse

Mapman

Quote from: Mapman on January 14, 2023, 06:05:19 PMI'll also see Lutoslawski's Concerto for Orchestra soon, as my university's orchestra will perform it. That concert in Dallas sounds fun!

I just went to that concert, and it was a good performance. They also played a short work by a student composer, and a saxophone concerto written last year.