Author Topic: Bach Goldberg Variations  (Read 72452 times)

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Offline vers la flamme

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Re: Bach Goldberg Variations
« Reply #440 on: September 14, 2020, 02:02:26 AM »
Schönberg  Nice!

I learned something today.  What about all the ones in French?

(Assuming you're a Mac guy too...)

´ = option+E then your vowel of choice, áéíóú
` = option+` (top left of the keyboard, a key that most of us probably never use) then your vowel of choice, àèìòù
ç = option+C
ˆ= option+I then your vowel of choice, âêîôû
œ = option+Q, hold shift for capital Œ
æ = option+' (the apostrophe), hold shift for capital Æ

Online André

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Re: Bach Goldberg Variations
« Reply #441 on: September 14, 2020, 03:52:27 AM »
I use an ipad. I just keep the vowel key pressed a second and a window pops up with all the choices, like this:ęêéèëėē.
Works for all the vowels, as well as a few consonants: čçć and ñń. For some reason the common reverse circumflex on the letter ‘r’, used to type correctly Dvorak is not available. Therefore, no need to put the acute accent on the a (á) if the reverse circumflex is absent. So it will remain Dvorak.

Offline Old San Antone

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Re: Bach Goldberg Variations
« Reply #442 on: September 14, 2020, 04:42:20 AM »
Thanks!

Offline Dry Brett Kavanaugh

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Re: Bach Goldberg Variations
« Reply #443 on: September 14, 2020, 04:51:41 AM »
You've been listening to classical music for how long, and you've just encountered this term for the first time? ;D


I deal with German philosophers in the 18-19th century at my work. For many years I thought these were stain in my books, ha ha.   :)

P.s. enjoy the violin transcriptions.
« Last Edit: September 14, 2020, 05:18:44 AM by Dry Brett Kavanaugh »

Offline Jo498

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Re: Bach Goldberg Variations
« Reply #444 on: September 14, 2020, 11:04:53 AM »
I have at least one German book that used "Schoenberg" because this was the correct spelling when he lived in the US but it is uncommon. In any case using ae, oe, ue has been an accepted way to deal with Umlaute even within German speaking countries if one was using a typewriter without them. As in the last millenium, I think it got worse with the early computers and word processors because they were international whereas typewriters usually had ä,ö,ü. It is not pretty, but not a real error. A real but unfortunately quite common error that might seem slight but looks jarring and ugly to native readers is treating the diphthong "äu" in the wrong way, e.g. Gebaüde instead of Gebäude (building). My sister recently told me that she read an american book/dissertation in art history that supposedly was pretty highly regarded but had this error all the time. It was about the Bauhaus and there is the expression "Bauhäusler" for the artists from that school.
Struck by the sounds before the sun,
I knew the night had gone.
The morning breeze like a bugle blew
Against the drums of dawn.
(Bob Dylan)

Offline aukhawk

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Re: Bach Goldberg Variations
« Reply #445 on: September 15, 2020, 12:36:42 AM »
The Academie Francaise (my misspelling deliberate) - the arbiter of French language practice - has repeatedly tried to remove accents from many French words, and especially things like place names in capitals (as on road signs) - since 1990 - but with very limited success so far.  I like to do my bit to help progress, and never use accents or diacritics in any written language.
« Last Edit: September 15, 2020, 12:40:43 AM by aukhawk »

Online André

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Re: Bach Goldberg Variations
« Reply #446 on: September 15, 2020, 08:36:01 AM »
Accents are there for a reason. Ignore it at your peril if you attempt to speak a language and don’t know what sound should be produced  ;).

Offline Jo498

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Re: Bach Goldberg Variations
« Reply #447 on: September 15, 2020, 09:05:42 AM »
Ignoring these things seems casual anglophone cultural imperialism, paired with laziness and therefore successful and broadly accepted.
Struck by the sounds before the sun,
I knew the night had gone.
The morning breeze like a bugle blew
Against the drums of dawn.
(Bob Dylan)

Online André

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Re: Bach Goldberg Variations
« Reply #448 on: September 15, 2020, 10:14:13 AM »
It’s not that bad  :D . More like the simple fact that the English language has strange rules for the pronunciation of vowels (not really rules, rather a set of received usages). An i, an o, an e etc can be pronounced differently without rhyme nor reason. For example: finite, infinite. Or to, go, for : 3 different sounds for the vowel o. Although not foolproof, accents guide the speaker to pronounce vowels in a uniform way.

Offline Dry Brett Kavanaugh

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Re: Bach Goldberg Variations
« Reply #449 on: September 15, 2020, 12:56:26 PM »
It’s not that bad  :D . More like the simple fact that the English language has strange rules for the pronunciation of vowels (not really rules, rather a set of received usages). An i, an o, an e etc can be pronounced differently without rhyme nor reason. For example: finite, infinite. Or to, go, for : 3 different sounds for the vowel o. Although not foolproof, accents guide the speaker to pronounce vowels in a uniform way.

Since English has very few letters, the letters must function for plural sounds. Plus words must share different meanings, ie. Fine. Also the language is a mixture of Latin and Germanic languages. Once, George Bernard Shaw said that you can write “GHOTI” and pronounce “fish.” I think Japanese and very few languages today maintain (nearly) phonetic scripts- one letter exclusively indicating one sound. That would necessitate a larger number of letters.

Offline Old San Antone

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Re: Bach Goldberg Variations
« Reply #450 on: September 15, 2020, 02:34:11 PM »
Revisiting this classic recording


Offline Old San Antone

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Re: Bach Goldberg Variations
« Reply #451 on: September 15, 2020, 02:51:34 PM »
Revisiting this classic recording



Amazing performance.  Variation 20, e.g., is staggeringly fine.

Offline Florestan

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Re: Bach Goldberg Variations
« Reply #452 on: September 16, 2020, 05:37:43 AM »
Since English has very few letters, the letters must function for plural sounds. Plus words must share different meanings, ie. Fine. Also the language is a mixture of Latin and Germanic languages. Once, George Bernard Shaw said that you can write “GHOTI” and pronounce “fish.” I think Japanese and very few languages today maintain (nearly) phonetic scripts- one letter exclusively indicating one sound. That would necessitate a larger number of letters.

I'm sorry but that's simply not true. Romanian has a phonetic orthography and uses exactly the same 26 letters of the English alphabet, plus 5 with diacritics.
“Especially as far as I am concerned, romanticism is not the bloodless intellectual commitment to a program, but the expression of my most profound mind and soul.” --- Sergei Bortkiewicz (1877-1952)

Offline Florestan

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Re: Bach Goldberg Variations
« Reply #453 on: September 16, 2020, 05:41:22 AM »
Accents are there for a reason. Ignore it at your peril if you attempt to speak a language and don’t know what sound should be produced  ;).

Not to mention that in Romanian the same word can have very different meanings if written with or without diacritics.  :D
“Especially as far as I am concerned, romanticism is not the bloodless intellectual commitment to a program, but the expression of my most profound mind and soul.” --- Sergei Bortkiewicz (1877-1952)

Offline Handelian

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Re: Bach Goldberg Variations
« Reply #454 on: November 05, 2020, 01:01:42 AM »
Amazing performance.  Variation 20, e.g., is staggeringly fine.

Introduced me to Bach on piano. Sold millions. Classic!