Béla Bartók (1881-1945)

Started by facehugger, April 06, 2007, 02:41:35 PM

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Symphonic Addict

#600
Was listening to Bartók's Piano Quartet in C minor (1898) from this recording. Yes, he wrote one, and what mastery and energy it displays. Despite it sounds heavily Brahmsian, I consider it one of his early masterpieces, the quality of the music is undeniable, and I can't imagine a more passionate and committed performance than this.

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Pohjolas Daughter

Quote from: Symphonic Addict on September 10, 2023, 07:46:43 PMWas listening to Bartók's Piano Quartet in C minor (1898) from this recording. Yes, he wrote one, and what mastery and energy it displays. Despite it sounds heavily Brahmsian, I consider it one of his early masterpieces, the quality of the music is undeniable, and I can't imagine a more passionate and committed performance than this.


I haven't heard of that quartet before now.  Have you heard any other recordings by them?

PD

pjme

Quote from: Pohjolas Daughter on September 11, 2023, 06:10:54 AMI haven't heard of that quartet before now.  Have you heard any other recordings by them?
I read that it is their debut album. So, we will have to wait for a disc with more" meat"....

Jo498

They apparently have by now two more discs out, one with Brahms' op.25 g minor and an arrangement of his 3rd symphony! and one with Lajtha, Francaix and Tansman, see below:
I only have the "hungarian" disc and agree that it is a very worthwhile discovery. I at first didn't realize that the Dohnanyi is also an early hardly known work (I first thought it was one of his *quintets" that are of course reasonably well known and have been recorded several times)

https://www.jpc.de/s/notos+quartett
Tout le malheur des hommes vient d'une seule chose, qui est de ne savoir pas demeurer en repos, dans une chambre.
- Blaise Pascal

Pohjolas Daughter

Quote from: Jo498 on September 11, 2023, 08:04:03 AMThey apparently have by now two more discs out, one with Brahms' op.25 g minor and an arrangement of his 3rd symphony! and one with Lajtha, Francaix and Tansman, see below:
I only have the "hungarian" disc and agree that it is a very worthwhile discovery. I at first didn't realize that the Dohnanyi is also an early hardly known work (I first thought it was one of his *quintets" that are of course reasonably well known and have been recorded several times)

https://www.jpc.de/s/notos+quartett
Thanks for the info.  :)

PD

atardecer

Schiff on Bartók, also with interesting points relating to music interpretation in general.

"In this metallic age of barbarians, only a relentless cultivation of our ability to dream, to analyze and to captivate can prevent our personality from degenerating into nothing or else into a personality like all the rest." - Fernando Pessoa

brewski

On Feb. 2, the Kosmos Bartók festival opens with this live concert from the NDR Elbphilharmonie Orchestra, conductor Alan Gilbert, and pianist Igor Levit in the all-Bartók program below. Alas, I'll be unable to catch the livestream, but they often archive their concerts.

Bartók
Divertimento for String Orchestra
Piano Concerto No. 3
Concerto for Orchestra


-Bruce
"I set down a beautiful chord on paper—and suddenly it rusts."
—Alfred Schnittke (1934-1998)

brewski

On Saturday night, Feb. 10 at 8:00 pm, the Boston Symphony Orchestra will broadcast this concert below live. Encore broadcast will be on Monday, Feb. 19.

Karina Canellakis, conductor
Alisa Weilerstein, cello
Karen Cargill, mezzo-soprano
Nathan Berg, bass-baritone
Jeremiah Kissel, narrator

Haydn: Cello Concerto in C
Bartók: Bluebeard's Castle

-Bruce
"I set down a beautiful chord on paper—and suddenly it rusts."
—Alfred Schnittke (1934-1998)