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Bach's St. Matthew Passion

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FideLeo:
Leonhardt.
(Even though I like how McCreesh's OVPP account often sounds.)
 

KevinP:
First of Bogey, which Richter? Five different Richter SMPs have been made available, and the last one, from 1979 {(p) 1980}, is considered a dud even by many who generally admire him.

I just counted 15 on my shelves and I may have forgotten one or two included in box sets filed elsewhere, and I know I've a couple DVDs I didn't count. Richter's 1959 recording is the one I reach for if I haven't listened to the work in a while. Bernstein's is in English but cut, yet includes a 16+minute talk by the conductor--not a bad way to become familiar with the work so long as you're aware it's cut. Furtwangler's is also heavily cut.

Klemperer's is powerful and as HIP as an elbow. No cuts here: all three CDs are filled to the brim at 73 minutes or more, and there's no coupling of another work.

McCreesh takes tempos so fast that he is the only conductor to ever fit the uncut work on two CDs. It's one of those interpretations that breathes new life into an old warhorse, but you wouldn't want to start with it. (Think about that math-wise. McCreesh's version is an entire jam-packed CD shorter than Klemperer's!)

Herreweghe's is good and (the 1999 version) comes with a truly excellent CD-ROM that's a virtual encyclopaedia on the SMP. If you see it, snag it.

Bogey:

--- Quote from: KevinP on December 11, 2007, 03:47:09 AM ---First of Bogey, which Richter? Five different Richter SMPs have been made available, and the last one, from 1979 {(p) 1980}, is considered a dud even by many who generally admire him.

I just counted 15 on my shelves and I may have forgotten one or two included in box sets filed elsewhere, and I know I've a couple DVDs I didn't count. Richter's 1959 recording is the one I reach for if I haven't listened to the work in a while. Bernstein's is in English but cut, yet includes a 16+minute talk by the conductor--not a bad way to become familiar with the work so long as you're aware it's cut. Furtwangler's is also heavily cut.

Klemperer's is powerful and as HIP as an elbow. No cuts here: all three CDs are filled to the brim at 73 minutes or more, and there's no coupling of another work.

McCreesh takes tempos so fast that he is the only conductor to ever fit the uncut work on two CDs. It's one of those interpretations that breathes new life into an old warhorse, but you wouldn't want to start with it. (Think about that math-wise. McCreesh's version is an entire jam-packed CD shorter than Klemperer's!)

Herreweghe's is good and (the 1999 version) comes with a truly excellent CD-ROM that's a virtual encyclopaedia on the SMP. If you see it, snag it.


--- End quote ---

It is the 1980 Kevin. 

FideLeo:

--- Quote from: KevinP on December 11, 2007, 03:47:09 AM ---
McCreesh takes tempos so fast that he is the only conductor to ever fit the uncut work on two CDs.


--- End quote ---

Hermann Max (pictured above in Bogey's post) does that also, and there he doesn't have to sound particularly rushed or even fast. 

71 dB:

--- Quote from: KevinP on December 11, 2007, 03:47:09 AM ---McCreesh takes tempos so fast that he is the only conductor to ever fit the uncut work on two CDs.
--- End quote ---

I have Gardiner and his version could be divided to two discs (66:03 + 50:01 + 41:19 = 157:23 = 78:52 + 78:49).

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