Author Topic: Bach's Bungalow  (Read 129339 times)

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Antoine Marchand

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Re: Bach's Bungalow
« Reply #320 on: September 04, 2011, 03:39:35 PM »


Les Folies Francoises (Patrick Cohen-Akenine, violin & Beatrice Martin, harpsichord)
Label: Fontmorigny

I wonder if somebody knows these Bach's sonatas for violin & harpsichord.

Offline Opus106

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Re: Bach's Bungalow
« Reply #321 on: September 24, 2011, 10:17:01 AM »
Where should one go for more music like the Chromatic Fantasy and Fugue?* I fell in love with the fantasia the first time I listened to it; and I'm sure the free and improvisatory nature has much to do with it. Apart from Bach's keyboard fantasias and toccatas (and perhaps Buxtehude's), which other composers' works of a similar nature would you recommend?



*A true Bachaholic, of course, knows that all the others are inferior. 0:) ;)
Regards,
Navneeth

kishnevi

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Like the ass in the fable....
« Reply #322 on: September 29, 2011, 01:00:00 PM »
..who starved to death between two piles of hay because he couldn't decide if he wanted to eat from the pile on the right or the pile on the left...

This arrived today


and now I'm faced with a serious "problem" (if only all our problems were no more serious than this one!)

Where should I begin listening?
start with CD1 and work through to the end, which means start with the cantatas and work through the other vocal works, then the organ works, and then the instrumental works?
start with the cantatas because they are the category of which I have the most unheard to date?
Or, since I'm not quite in the mood for cantatas at the moment,  start with the organ works, the second most underrepresented category in my collection?
Or start with the instrumental stuff because they're what I know best and then go back to the cantatas and organ works?
Or are there any individual performances I might want to listen to before anything else?

Bulldog

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Re: Bach's Bungalow
« Reply #323 on: September 29, 2011, 02:59:33 PM »
..who starved to death between two piles of hay because he couldn't decide if he wanted to eat from the pile on the right or the pile on the left...

This arrived today


and now I'm faced with a serious "problem" (if only all our problems were no more serious than this one!)

Where should I begin listening?
start with CD1 and work through to the end, which means start with the cantatas and work through the other vocal works, then the organ works, and then the instrumental works?
start with the cantatas because they are the category of which I have the most unheard to date?
Or, since I'm not quite in the mood for cantatas at the moment,  start with the organ works, the second most underrepresented category in my collection?
Or start with the instrumental stuff because they're what I know best and then go back to the cantatas and organ works?
Or are there any individual performances I might want to listen to before anything else?

Sell it as fast as you can - problem solved. 8)

Antoine Marchand

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Re: Bach's Bungalow
« Reply #324 on: September 29, 2011, 05:50:29 PM »
..who starved to death between two piles of hay because he couldn't decide if he wanted to eat from the pile on the right or the pile on the left...

This arrived today


and now I'm faced with a serious "problem" (if only all our problems were no more serious than this one!)

Where should I begin listening?
start with CD1 and work through to the end, which means start with the cantatas and work through the other vocal works, then the organ works, and then the instrumental works?
start with the cantatas because they are the category of which I have the most unheard to date?
Or, since I'm not quite in the mood for cantatas at the moment,  start with the organ works, the second most underrepresented category in my collection?
Or start with the instrumental stuff because they're what I know best and then go back to the cantatas and organ works?
Or are there any individual performances I might want to listen to before anything else?

Some recommendations to begin:  :)



Leon

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Re: Bach's Bungalow
« Reply #325 on: January 09, 2012, 05:55:24 AM »
I recently heard the recordings by Cafe Zimmermann of the orchestral works, Concerts avec plusieurs instruments and was impressed.

Anyone else know them?

 :)
« Last Edit: January 09, 2012, 06:22:03 AM by Arnold »

Offline Marc

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Re: Bach's Bungalow
« Reply #326 on: January 13, 2012, 02:09:24 PM »
I recently heard the recordings by Cafe Zimmermann of the orchestral works, Concerts avec plusieurs instruments and was impressed.

Anyone else know them?

I do, for instance, and I think they're very good. And my guess is that I'm not the only one.

Here's a thread about Bach's orchestral works btw:
http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,981.0.html
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Offline Opus106

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Re: Bach's Bungalow
« Reply #327 on: January 16, 2012, 02:02:52 AM »


Well, the picture doesn't say much, but it's the complete Bach Edition from Warner/Teldec/Erato.

I just wish they would release the keyboard works -- those for harpsichord, specifically -- again, since it's much of that set which isn't easily available compared to the organ works, chamber/orchestal music, passions and canatatas.

http://www.prestoclassical.co.uk/r/Teldec/2564664202
Regards,
Navneeth

Antoine Marchand

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Re: Bach's Bungalow
« Reply #328 on: January 16, 2012, 05:39:05 AM »


Well, the picture doesn't say much, but it's the complete Bach Edition from Warner/Teldec/Erato.

I just wish they would release the keyboard works -- those for harpsichord, specifically -- again, since it's much of that set which isn't easily available compared to the organ works, chamber/orchestal music, passions and canatatas.

http://www.prestoclassical.co.uk/r/Teldec/2564664202

Excellent news, Nav! Anyway I guess it will be available cheaper because Presto Classical is almost never the best option regarding big boxes.  :)

Online Que

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Re: Bach's Bungalow
« Reply #329 on: January 16, 2012, 05:43:42 AM »


Well, the picture doesn't say much, but it's the complete Bach Edition from Warner/Teldec/Erato.

I just wish they would release the keyboard works -- those for harpsichord, specifically -- again, since it's much of that set which isn't easily available compared to the organ works, chamber/orchestal music, passions and canatatas.

http://www.prestoclassical.co.uk/r/Teldec/2564664202

Looks decidely scary! :o Though if any company, Waner has the best back catalogue for such a project, but from the decription it seems they decided on "mixed" performers for groups of works - I'd hate that...

Q

Antoine Marchand

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Re: Bach's Bungalow
« Reply #330 on: January 16, 2012, 05:49:51 AM »
Looks decidely scary! :o Though if any company, Waner has the best back catalogue for such a project, but from the decription it seems they decided on "mixed" performers for groups of works - I'd hate that...

Q

I think it's simply a reissue of the Bach 2000 Edition.

Offline mc ukrneal

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Re: Bach's Bungalow
« Reply #331 on: January 16, 2012, 06:22:15 AM »
I think it's simply a reissue of the Bach 2000 Edition.
Would seem so. They each have the exact same number of discs.
Be kind to your fellow posters!!

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: Bach's Bungalow
« Reply #332 on: January 16, 2012, 12:32:15 PM »
Color coded by genre, eh? So I should guess the wheat color is the cantatas &c. YMMV, of course, but that's more Bach cantata than I require.
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His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Offline Opus106

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Re: Bach's Bungalow
« Reply #333 on: June 04, 2012, 02:32:19 AM »
Here's news of a quasi-dramatised SMP. Has anyone watched it yet? Oh, and if you haven't, Peter Sellars was involved in it.

Regards,
Navneeth

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: Bach's Bungalow
« Reply #334 on: June 04, 2012, 03:11:45 AM »
. . . Peter Sellars was involved in it.

Faugh.

There: got it out of my system.
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Offline Leo K.

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Re: Bach's Bungalow
« Reply #335 on: June 09, 2012, 05:47:35 AM »
Faugh.

There: got it out of my system.


You beat me to it!

 ;)

kishnevi

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Re: Bach's Bungalow
« Reply #336 on: January 30, 2013, 10:39:06 AM »
(Responding to a conversation in Haydn's Haus that can be traced back starting here:
http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,54.msg692832.html#msg692832)

And how do we know that this is specifically what he meant by the solo harpsichord?

I've always thought that he specifically meant "My music and my harpsichord playing will equally knock your socks off!"*

There is an argument that Musical Offering has a sort of philosophical intention behind it, meaning a defense of "old school" against the up and coming galantaries of the mid 18th century, but even that had a specificallyl musical context to it.   Beyond that, I've never seen anything to indicate that his non-choral works had any meaning behind them in the way that Mandryka proposes.   He may have supported social equality but that does mean he was determined to illustrate it through his instrumental compositions.

The article Sanantonio provided is informative, though I'm not really convinced by it;  but it does seem to disagree with Mandryka's reading, which in itself is a strong data point for this discussion.

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: Bach's Bungalow
« Reply #337 on: January 30, 2013, 10:49:40 AM »
The article Sanantonio provided is informative, though I'm not really convinced by it [....]

Most informative . . . at the outset, he owns that it is purely speculative, which does not diminish the interest (nor the epochal resonance).  Still, not firmly applicable to the piece.  And, as you say, the Baroque practice of allegorical reflection is entirely different to the Romantic Expression of the Individual.
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
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http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Offline North Star

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Re: Bach's Bungalow
« Reply #338 on: January 30, 2013, 11:11:33 AM »
(Responding to a conversation in Haydn's Haus that can be traced back starting here:
http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,54.msg692832.html#msg692832)

I've always thought that he specifically meant "My music and my harpsichord playing will equally knock your socks off!"*

There is an argument that Musical Offering has a sort of philosophical intention behind it, meaning a defense of "old school" against the up and coming galantaries of the mid 18th century, but even that had a specificallyl musical context to it.   Beyond that, I've never seen anything to indicate that his non-choral works had any meaning behind them in the way that Mandryka proposes.   He may have supported social equality but that does mean he was determined to illustrate it through his instrumental compositions.

The article Sanantonio provided is informative, though I'm not really convinced by it;  but it does seem to disagree with Mandryka's reading, which in itself is a strong data point for this discussion.
Agreed, but what about the Ciaccona?
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Offline Opus106

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Re: Bach's Bungalow
« Reply #339 on: January 30, 2013, 11:25:12 AM »
Agreed, but what about the Ciaccona?

What about it? The Romantics certainly saw something in it and went on a transcription spree, to the point of almost forgetting the rest of the partita, but do you think Bach really had a message attached to it?
« Last Edit: January 30, 2013, 11:30:48 AM by Opus106 »
Regards,
Navneeth