Author Topic: Bach's Violin Sonatas & Partitas (solo)  (Read 89936 times)

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Offline San Antone

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Re: Bach's Violin Sonatas & Partitas (solo)
« Reply #260 on: February 23, 2019, 02:57:05 AM »
The other thing about Letzbor's recordings is he split up the works: a recording of just the partitas and another recording of just the sonatas.  I like to hear them alternated, as is done by most violinists.  But in looking at Giuliano Carmignola's, they are not alternated (but at least they are all on one recording). 

I started listening to Letzbor's sonata record and the sound eventually got to me and I switched to Carmignola.  But I switched again to Monica Huggett, who alternates the sonatas and partitias.
« Last Edit: February 23, 2019, 03:11:51 AM by San Antone »

Offline Mandryka

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Re: Bach's Violin Sonatas & Partitas (solo)
« Reply #261 on: February 23, 2019, 03:34:31 AM »
The other thing about Letzbor's recordings is he split up the works: a recording of just the partitas and another recording of just the sonatas

yes it would be interesting to know why he does that. They're in the usual order I think, but it seems that there are some manuscripts (Kellner) which put them in something more like Letzbor's order.  I just found this

https://www.jstor.org/stable/3126976?seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents
« Last Edit: February 23, 2019, 03:39:03 AM by Mandryka »
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Offline JBS

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Re: Bach's Violin Sonatas & Partitas (solo)
« Reply #262 on: February 23, 2019, 08:00:58 PM »
My first recording of the S&Ps was the one by Heifetz, with sonatas in CD1 and partitas on CD2.  So the idea is not very strange to me.
There is a certain sense to it since it allows one to focus on each of the types,  bringing the similarities and differences among the sonatas and among the partitas to the fore.

and of course if you prefer the alternating arrangement, you can program or rip/burn the sequence you prefer.

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Offline aukhawk

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Re: Bach's Violin Sonatas & Partitas (solo)
« Reply #263 on: February 24, 2019, 03:37:20 AM »
Much as I love tbe music, I'm unlikely to listen to more than two of the suites in one session.  I also happen to generally prefer the Sonatas to the Partitas, so if I were buying physical media** I would welcome a 1-disc set of the Sonatas.  I also generally prefer the minor key to the major so a 1-disc set of S1P1S2 works for me too.  Assuming of course there's a price advantage to the single disc.  Obviously if the recording/performance turns out to really catch my fancy I'll add the rest.

** I don't actually have a CD player any more but if a (used) CD is the cheapest or only way to get hold of the music, then I'll buy it and rip it, I do still prefer that to streaming.

Talking of streaming, I greatly surprised myself this morning by listening to the Hilary Hahn recording of the 2nd sonata - quite splendid, especially the Andante which is just spellbinding.
« Last Edit: February 24, 2019, 08:29:07 AM by aukhawk »

Offline Mandryka

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Re: Bach's Violin Sonatas & Partitas (solo)
« Reply #264 on: March 05, 2019, 10:40:33 AM »


There's a sense of balance here, the structure of each movement is gently laid bare. He's almost innocent sounding, self effacing, and not forceful. The rhythm and phrasing is fluid -- I mean it transcends the the bar lines, but not in an ostentatious way. I like it very much.  Szeryng recorded the music twice I think, I think this is the first. 
« Last Edit: March 05, 2019, 10:46:10 AM by Mandryka »
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Offline Mandryka

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Re: Bach's Violin Sonatas & Partitas (solo)
« Reply #265 on: April 23, 2019, 10:22:19 AM »
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Re: Bach's Violin Sonatas & Partitas (solo)
« Reply #266 on: April 23, 2019, 10:37:51 AM »


There's a sense of balance here, the structure of each movement is gently laid bare. He's almost innocent sounding, self effacing, and not forceful. The rhythm and phrasing is fluid -- I mean it transcends the the bar lines, but not in an ostentatious way. I like it very much.  Szeryng recorded the music twice I think, I think this is the first.

I'm tempted to get that, until I think "can it possibly be better than his DG recording?" I always answer "no," to myself. Maybe I'm wrong.

Offline Mandryka

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Re: Bach's Violin Sonatas & Partitas (solo)
« Reply #267 on: April 23, 2019, 11:24:18 AM »
I'm tempted to get that, until I think "can it possibly be better than his DG recording?" I always answer "no," to myself. Maybe I'm wrong.

I was planning on exploring the different recordings. Maybe tomorrow .
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Offline hvbias

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Re: Bach's Violin Sonatas & Partitas (solo)
« Reply #268 on: April 27, 2019, 06:14:16 AM »
I listened to Szeryng play BWV1004 and 1005 on DG, the best way I could describe it is it was "dry" and I don't mean in relation to the recording quality. I wasn't really captivated by what I was hearing. This is my first time hearing him play them and I will give them another listen.

Offline Mandryka

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Re: Bach's Violin Sonatas & Partitas (solo)
« Reply #269 on: April 27, 2019, 08:47:06 PM »
I'm tempted to get that, until I think "can it possibly be better than his DG recording?" I always answer "no," to myself. Maybe I'm wrong.

I don’t think you’re wrong, the DG is very good indeed.
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Offline André

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Re: Bach's Violin Sonatas & Partitas (solo)
« Reply #270 on: April 28, 2019, 12:13:45 PM »
I don’t think you’re wrong, the DG is very good indeed.

Absolutely. But I understand Staxomega’s impression. There is a hint of wiriness in the DGG Szeryng. I haven’t heard his first version though.

Offline T. D.

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Re: Bach's Violin Sonatas & Partitas (solo)
« Reply #271 on: November 13, 2019, 02:25:11 PM »
Newcomer, looking for a HIP recording of the S&P. Have recordings by Podger, Szeryng (DG) and Grumiaux.
Leaning to one of 2 recent releases: Carmignola (DG) or von der Goltz (Aparte). Know little about v d G, Carmignola is a musician I've meant to hear but never got around to. On the basis of brief sound clips, I enjoy v d G's "let the music speak for itself" approach, but get the impression I might prefer Carmignola's Chaconne in D minor (important factor for me).
Suggestions (these or others) welcome.

Offline Mandryka

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Re: Bach's Violin Sonatas & Partitas (solo)
« Reply #272 on: November 13, 2019, 02:50:06 PM »
Not a reply to above post!



BWV1002 allemande. His way of bowing reminds me of Paolo Pandolfo, the music is very interestingly articulated. The sound is excellent. This is a taster on Spotify, I think the whole thing is set to be released on the 15th.

If this sample is representative, he has some new things to say.
« Last Edit: November 13, 2019, 03:01:30 PM by Mandryka »
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Offline Mandryka

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Re: Bach's Violin Sonatas & Partitas (solo)
« Reply #273 on: November 13, 2019, 02:52:19 PM »
Newcomer, looking for a HIP recording of the S&P. Have recordings by Podger, Szeryng (DG) and Grumiaux.
Leaning to one of 2 recent releases: Carmignola (DG) or von der Goltz (Aparte). Know little about v d G, Carmignola is a musician I've meant to hear but never got around to. On the basis of brief sound clips, I enjoy v d G's "let the music speak for itself" approach, but get the impression I might prefer Carmignola's Chaconne in D minor (important factor for me).
Suggestions (these or others) welcome.

I thought both Carmignola and Goltz were excellent, but there are also excellent old ones. Maybe try to sample Sigiswald  Kuijken’s first recording and Lucy van Dael and John Holloway and Ryo Terakado and Ingrid Matthews?

Are you looking for extrovert or introvert performances?
« Last Edit: November 13, 2019, 03:03:07 PM by Mandryka »
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Offline aukhawk

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Re: Bach's Violin Sonatas & Partitas (solo)
« Reply #274 on: November 14, 2019, 01:59:01 AM »
Leaning to one of 2 recent releases: Carmignola (DG) or von der Goltz (Aparte). Know little about v d G, Carmignola is a musician I've meant to hear but never got around to. On the basis of brief sound clips, I enjoy v d G's "let the music speak for itself" approach, but get the impression I might prefer Carmignola's Chaconne in D minor (important factor for me).
Suggestions (these or others) welcome.

Carmignola surveyed at time of release a year ago on page 12 of this thread.  Specifially of his Chaconne I wrote (to cries of disapproval):
Which brings me finally to the Ciaccona.  This is a most extraordinary performance, he seems to have complete mastery of the complexities and slithers through it all with a light and facile touch.  There is no sense of travail at all, he's as glib as a gypsy fiddler in a restaurant.

I like Carmignola, but not as much as I like him in Vivaldi, and not as much as I like Ibragimova, Mullova, van Dael, or Brooks, in Bach.  Goltz is certainly up there as well.
Mullova was the runaway winner in our Blind Comparison (pre-dating Carmignola, or Goltz).
I'll keep an eye out for the new Zehetmair.
« Last Edit: November 14, 2019, 02:09:49 AM by aukhawk »

Offline T. D.

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Re: Bach's Violin Sonatas & Partitas (solo)
« Reply #275 on: November 14, 2019, 07:12:40 AM »
Thanks. Will have to do some more sampling.
Offhand I would have said I prefer extroverted performances, but I really enjoy the Goltz samples, and he seems on the introverted side.
I got the impression Holloway (physical CDs) is OOP and nearly impossible to find. I have a personal bias against Naxos  ??? , so van Dael didn't come into consideration. Isabelle Faust is another name that comes up.

Offline aukhawk

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Re: Bach's Violin Sonatas & Partitas (solo)
« Reply #276 on: November 14, 2019, 08:30:53 AM »
Van Dael is quite an old recording compared with all most of the others mentioned so far, and has been criticised for audible breathing noises by the musician. She's certainly full of humanity.  She is the polar opposite (within HIP bounds) of Faust, who is steely verging on icy.  I like them both.  Mullova has the middle ground here, which I find less interesting.
« Last Edit: November 14, 2019, 08:33:36 AM by aukhawk »

Offline T. D.

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Re: Bach's Violin Sonatas & Partitas (solo)
« Reply #277 on: November 14, 2019, 09:11:59 PM »
Van Dael is quite an old recording compared with all most of the others mentioned so far, and has been criticised for audible breathing noises by the musician. She's certainly full of humanity.  She is the polar opposite (within HIP bounds) of Faust, who is steely verging on icy.  I like them both.  Mullova has the middle ground here, which I find less interesting.

Thanks, I pretty much agree with your comments. Listened to some Van Dael and find her extremely impressive. Breathing noise doesn't bother me. If more of the Naxos recordings I heard were of this quality, I'd own more and have a higher opinion of the label! Also agree on Faust; enjoy her playing but wouldn't want it to be the only recording I own.
I like the "polar" approach and enjoy hearing "opposite" versions. Mullova's certainly good, but I'd gravitate to the poles. Still very high on Goltz's contemplative (IMO) approach but not sure it's objectively (whatever that means) better than the aforementioned.

Offline Mandryka

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Re: Bach's Violin Sonatas & Partitas (solo)
« Reply #278 on: November 15, 2019, 01:23:43 AM »
Not a reply to above post!



BWV1002 allemande. His way of bowing reminds me of Paolo Pandolfo, the music is very interestingly articulated. The sound is excellent. This is a taster on Spotify, I think the whole thing is set to be released on the 15th.

If this sample is representative, he has some new things to say.



Quote
My first Baroque violin and bow experiences came when I was young and a member of the Concentus Musicus for several projects under the direction of Nikolaus Harnoncourr, sharing a desk with Alice Harnoncourt — a wonderful musician and a pioneer of the instrument. Back then, shortly before I recorded the sonatas and partitas for the first time, on an instrument with a modern set-up, he was ready right away to work on these pieces with me in derail. This is something I have never forgotten.

For the new recording I wanted to use every possible means of getting close to Bach and the sound and technique of his time. Dispensing with chin rest and shoulder rest, one gains an immediate proximity to the instrument that allows more and more timbral possibilities. The two instruments I have chosen for these recordings are, for the partitas. a particularly finely made violin by an unknown South Tyrolean master from around 1685, which a close friend has made available to me, and, for the sonatas, my own wonderfully preserved Joannes Udalricus Eberle of around 1750. These two instruments, together with the acoustics of the priory church of St. Gerold, provided me with a wide range of sound. The two Baroque bows for this recording, replicas of historical bows from around ino by Taman Muthesius and Gerhard Landwehr, could hardly be more different, in length, weight and sound formation.

 Thomas Zehetmair

Just listening to the prelude and fugue from 1005, it's a bit . . . dramatic . . . melodramatic.
« Last Edit: November 15, 2019, 01:25:29 AM by Mandryka »
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Offline Mandryka

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Re: Bach's Violin Sonatas & Partitas (solo)
« Reply #279 on: November 15, 2019, 08:52:13 AM »
I got the impression Holloway (physical CDs) is OOP and nearly impossible to find.

That’s a shame, I just fled from the new Zehetmair 1005, which isn’t my sort of thing, listening to Holloway and I think it’s ideal.
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