Carmen!

Started by Brian, April 25, 2007, 03:07:17 PM

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yashin

It always striked me as a difficult opera to get into - it has long slow moments for me. I have not found a wholly acceptable version to watch or listen too -maybe i need to see some of the more recent DVDs

What is do have are the cds on the Chandos in English label - Carmen with Patricia Bardon - not listened to it in a long time. Find the English quite stilted.

I also have the Carmen conducted by Sinopoli and with Jennifer Larmore as Carmen, Angela Gheorghiu as Michaela - again not brilliant.

On DVD i have seen the old Covent Garden  with Luis Lima and Maria Ewing conducted by Zubin Mehta - now i did like this but is has aged now and i have it only on VHS.

What about the current crop of DVDs?
Anna Caterina Antonacci in the John Eliot Gardiner conducted production from Paris? or the same singer with Jonas Kaufmann in London? Or as some have mentioned the Alagna/Garanca from the Met.
I must admit i like Kaufmann in some roles but his 'thick' voice takes some getting used to.  I love both Alagna and Garanca so maybe that is the one for me.

Florestan

#121
For me, the main character of this opera is not Carmen, but Don Jose:  a fragile, weak and impressionable man, vacillating between pure love & filial piety and the (inexorable) appeal of carnal love & lust. His only and fatal moment of strength and resolution is indeed in the final scene, when he is at last able to make his mind and carry it through the ultimate consequences. (In this respect, I strongly urge you to read the original Prosper Merimee's story, one of the forgotten yet quintessential masterpieces of Romanticism).

Now, this very opera is one of the main reasons for me being hooked on Classical music and THE reason I am an avid opera fan --- and it has remained my favorite opera ever since . I was in my early teens when I first watched in cinema Francesco Rosi's production with Placido Domingo and Julia Migenes-Johnson and I was literally spellbound. I watched it (alone) twice in a week and forced my parents into watching it together with me the following week. Words fail me --- I cannot properly describe the effect it had on me (I can only compare it, in terms of the lasting and positive impact it had on my life, with Zefirellli's Jesus of Nazareth.).

So, for pure sentimental reasons this is my favorite version.

The only other recording I own of this opera is



But I am sure that no matter what recording I'll ever hear, the shivers over my spine would be the same.




When I'm creating at the piano, I tend to feel happy; but - the eternal dilemma - how can we be happy amid the unhappiness of others? I'd do everything I could to give everyone a moment of happiness. That's what's at the heart of my music. — Nino Rota

sospiro

#122
Quote from: Il Conte Rodolfo on April 25, 2011, 09:56:18 AMFor me, the main character of this opera is not Carmen, but Don Jose:  a fragile, weak and impressionable man, vacillating between pure love & filial piety and the (inexorable) appeal of carnal love & lust. His only and fatal moment of strength and resolution is indeed in the final scene, when he is at last able to make his mind and carry it through the ultimate consequences. (In this respect, I strongly urge you to read the original Prosper Merimee's story, one of the forgotten yet quintessential masterpieces of Romanticism).

Now, this very opera is one of the main reasons for me being hooked on Classical music and THE reason I am an avid opera fan --- and it has remained my favorite opera ever since . I was in my early teens when I first watched in cinema Francesco Rosi's production with Placido Domingo and Julia Migenes-Johnson and I was literally spellbound. I watched it (alone) twice in a week and forced my parents into watching it together with me the following week. Words fail me --- I cannot properly describe the effect it had on me (I can only compare it, in terms of the lasting and positive impact it had on my life, with Zefirellli's Jesus of Nazareth.).

So, for pure sentimental reasons this is my favorite version.

The only other recording I own of this opera is



But I am sure that no matter what recording I'll ever hear, the shivers over my spine would be the same.


What a fabulous story, thanks for posting it.

I love hearing about other people's opera journeys.
Annie

bonzo75

hi, on vinyl, which are your favourite gypsy song and Toreador?