Author Topic: Photography At Home  (Read 9756 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Todd

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 18501
Re: Photography At Home
« Reply #320 on: September 12, 2020, 06:50:00 AM »
Todd, how far away are any of the fires from you?


I'm roughly 40 miles from the east metro fires that are prompting the majority of the evacuation orders.  (All of Clackamas County is under some level of evacuation order, an historical first.)  I'm around 15 miles from small western fires that have been contained.  While wildfire is obviously a possibility where I live, it is a low probability event given the vegetation where my house is located.  Of much more concern is the worst air quality since 1980.  I'm not concerned for myself as I suffer no respiratory conditions and will remain indoors for the most part, and use a mask when outdoors, but quite a few other people are not so fortunate.

The Level 1 steps listed in the linked article are typically not followed to the letter.  The number of people included in the current orders requires NW Natural to shut off gas service to entire areas; the firm does not have the manpower to visit all impacted locations.  Similarly, PGE has had to shut off electricity to entire areas. 

Oregon endures wildfires every year, and often the fires burn more acreage than this year.  The difference this year is that the fires moved into portions of the Willamette Valley where most people in the state live.  This was directly caused by an exceedingly rare summer wind "event" (not storm, apparently) that blew in warm air and embers from fires burning in the east.
The universe is change; life is opinion. - Marcus Aurelius, Meditations

Everything dies - Alien Bounty Hunter, The X-Files

Everyone dies - William Barr, United States Attorney General

Offline Pohjolas Daughter

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 3417
  • Location: USA
Re: Photography At Home
« Reply #321 on: September 13, 2020, 12:23:59 PM »

I'm roughly 40 miles from the east metro fires that are prompting the majority of the evacuation orders.  (All of Clackamas County is under some level of evacuation order, an historical first.)  I'm around 15 miles from small western fires that have been contained.  While wildfire is obviously a possibility where I live, it is a low probability event given the vegetation where my house is located.  Of much more concern is the worst air quality since 1980.  I'm not concerned for myself as I suffer no respiratory conditions and will remain indoors for the most part, and use a mask when outdoors, but quite a few other people are not so fortunate.

The Level 1 steps listed in the linked article are typically not followed to the letter.  The number of people included in the current orders requires NW Natural to shut off gas service to entire areas; the firm does not have the manpower to visit all impacted locations.  Similarly, PGE has had to shut off electricity to entire areas. 

Oregon endures wildfires every year, and often the fires burn more acreage than this year.  The difference this year is that the fires moved into portions of the Willamette Valley where most people in the state live.  This was directly caused by an exceedingly rare summer wind "event" (not storm, apparently) that blew in warm air and embers from fires burning in the east.
Thank you for the information.  Good to hear that you seem to be in pretty good shape due to where you live, etc.  I imagine that the air quality (and soot) must be big problems in many areas.  I have an older friend who sadly has both bad respiratory issues and diabetes who has had to be extra-careful of late due to Covid-19.  It's hard to fathom how people who have had to flee the fires are dealing with it due to the pandemic.  I'd imagine that the eerie colors of the sky and the news have helped to create a rather surrealistic feeling/vibe?  Despite wildfires being common, have you seen an uptick over the past few decades Todd?  Quite interesting to hear about the winds.  I wonder what caused them?

And, yes, I can't see a power company being able to send out manpower house-by-house in instances like these.

Trying to remember where I read or heard about one homeowner talking about how quickly things in their area turned from a level 1 to a level 3; it was quite fast--which was what had made me stand up and take notice.   :(

In any event, take care.

PD

Offline Todd

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 18501
Re: Photography At Home
« Reply #322 on: September 13, 2020, 01:46:53 PM »
Despite wildfires being common, have you seen an uptick over the past few decades Todd


I've witnessed what the data shows: the same or fewer fires per year, but the ones that occur can be larger.  There have been two mammoth fires (ie, >500,000 acres) in Oregon this century.  But Oregon has had some mammoth fires in the past.  The first fire in the Tillamook Burn (>350,000 acres in 1933) left damage visible into the 1990s. 

After the first day of the smoke rolling in, the sky now just looks like a burlap sack when the sun is out.  Evacuation levels are being scaled back in most areas, and so far, as of last night at about 10:00 PM, about 40,000 residents had to actually evacuate.  Terrible, absolutely, but not the catastrophic figure reported by some news outlets.

We get strong easterly winds every November and December - they're basically cold, wimpy Santa Ana winds that blow down the Columbia Gorge - but every once in a while a weather pattern emerges that replicates them in the summer. 
The universe is change; life is opinion. - Marcus Aurelius, Meditations

Everything dies - Alien Bounty Hunter, The X-Files

Everyone dies - William Barr, United States Attorney General

Offline Pohjolas Daughter

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 3417
  • Location: USA
Re: Photography At Home
« Reply #323 on: September 13, 2020, 05:25:35 PM »

I've witnessed what the data shows: the same or fewer fires per year, but the ones that occur can be larger.  There have been two mammoth fires (ie, >500,000 acres) in Oregon this century.  But Oregon has had some mammoth fires in the past.  The first fire in the Tillamook Burn (>350,000 acres in 1933) left damage visible into the 1990s. 

After the first day of the smoke rolling in, the sky now just looks like a burlap sack when the sun is out.  Evacuation levels are being scaled back in most areas, and so far, as of last night at about 10:00 PM, about 40,000 residents had to actually evacuate.  Terrible, absolutely, but not the catastrophic figure reported by some news outlets.

We get strong easterly winds every November and December - they're basically cold, wimpy Santa Ana winds that blow down the Columbia Gorge - but every once in a while a weather pattern emerges that replicates them in the summer.
So, thinking about it for a while and looking into the facts, do you think that there are more major fires these days overall?  Where also (and I'm meaning this politely) are you gathering your data from?  Do you believe that climate change is a factor at all too?  Wondering how much too possible changes in controlled fire burns vs. how things are handled these days are effecting things?  Trying to learn more about fire prevention here.....certainly not an expert.  :(  Just trying to learn.

Best wishes,

PD

Offline Todd

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 18501
Re: Photography At Home
« Reply #324 on: September 13, 2020, 05:34:11 PM »
The Congressional Research Service publishes data on wildfires, as do an assortment of federal and state agencies.  I always rely on government agencies for such data.  If I had access to logging company data, I'd use that, too.  The definition of "major" would need to be established, but there are fewer, bigger fires, on average.  AGW certainly contributes.  I know nothing about fire prevention, though one of my employees is a former smokejumper, so he may have insights if I remember to ask him.  I'm sure there are fact based resources available online.
The universe is change; life is opinion. - Marcus Aurelius, Meditations

Everything dies - Alien Bounty Hunter, The X-Files

Everyone dies - William Barr, United States Attorney General