Author Topic: Alfred Schnittke (1934-1998)  (Read 137698 times)

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Offline Maestro267

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Re: Alfred Schnittke (1934-1998)
« Reply #1160 on: May 13, 2020, 03:44:50 AM »
The aforementioned discs have arrived. Listening to the 5th Symphony right now. The third movement in particular is incredible! Some utterly enormous climaxes!

Offline relm1

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Re: Alfred Schnittke (1934-1998)
« Reply #1161 on: May 13, 2020, 04:42:28 AM »
The aforementioned discs have arrived. Listening to the 5th Symphony right now. The third movement in particular is incredible! Some utterly enormous climaxes!

Did you get the Viola Concerto/In Memoriam too?  I loved that disc very much.

Offline Maestro267

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Re: Alfred Schnittke (1934-1998)
« Reply #1162 on: May 13, 2020, 05:56:28 AM »
I did, yes. I'm listening to In Memoriam right now. Admittedly I've not heard the original Piano Quintet yet.

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Alfred Schnittke (1934-1998)
« Reply #1163 on: May 13, 2020, 06:04:39 AM »
I did, yes. I'm listening to In Memoriam right now. Admittedly I've not heard the original Piano Quintet yet.

Please rectify that ASAP. One of my favorite Schnittke works is that incredible Piano Quintet.
“Works of art create rules; rules do not create works of art.” - Claude Debussy

Offline Maestro267

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Re: Alfred Schnittke (1934-1998)
« Reply #1164 on: May 13, 2020, 06:12:44 AM »
I didn't expect that big organ chord in the third movement!

Offline relm1

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Re: Alfred Schnittke (1934-1998)
« Reply #1165 on: May 13, 2020, 03:19:33 PM »
I didn't expect that big organ chord in the third movement!

And I've never heard that chord more jarring than in the BIS recording.  I love this piece in its orchestral version.  It's so dark and personal.  The original quintet was introspective but the orchestral version (especially Lev Markiz) was grim and intense like none other I've heard.

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Alfred Schnittke (1934-1998)
« Reply #1166 on: May 28, 2020, 04:06:35 PM »
Great to see more love for Sketches. An apparently inoffensive music with many bizarre touches. Schnittke's imagination amazes me.

Sketches is such a fun work! Like you, I love the zaniness that Schnittke adds throughout the work.
“Works of art create rules; rules do not create works of art.” - Claude Debussy

Offline Symphonic Addict

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Re: Alfred Schnittke (1934-1998)
« Reply #1167 on: May 28, 2020, 04:59:19 PM »
Sketches is such a fun work! Like you, I love the zaniness that Schnittke adds throughout the work.

Indeed. I loved it instantly when I stumbled upon it. It's like the music for a sinister circus featuring some disturbing clowns.

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Alfred Schnittke (1934-1998)
« Reply #1168 on: May 28, 2020, 05:16:22 PM »
Indeed. I loved it instantly when I stumbled upon it. It's like the music for a sinister circus featuring some disturbing clowns.

Ha! ;D Yes, indeed.
“Works of art create rules; rules do not create works of art.” - Claude Debussy

Offline Maestro267

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Re: Alfred Schnittke (1934-1998)
« Reply #1169 on: July 28, 2020, 10:01:55 AM »
Next disc in my collection: Symphonies Nos. 6 & 7, continuing the BIS cycle. It'll be interesting to dive into his 1990s output. I think the latest orchestral work I have of his is the 2nd Cello Concerto from 1990.

Meantime, I'm currently listening to Symphony No. 4. I'm only really noticing now how prominent the piano is in this work. In fact, I almost think the pianist should be credited as a soloist.
« Last Edit: July 28, 2020, 10:10:24 AM by Maestro267 »

Offline Maestro267

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Re: Alfred Schnittke (1934-1998)
« Reply #1170 on: July 29, 2020, 04:01:13 AM »
Something I notice with Symphony No. 6 is that the sound space is a lot less filled than it is in a lot of the other works I've heard.

Offline relm1

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Re: Alfred Schnittke (1934-1998)
« Reply #1171 on: July 29, 2020, 04:58:55 AM »
Something I notice with Symphony No. 6 is that the sound space is a lot less filled than it is in a lot of the other works I've heard.

Yes, the first five symphonies are in a very different sound world then the late symphonies.  I think Schnittke might have had one of his bad strokes and been half paralyzed around this time so composing became considerably more difficult and that might explain the shift too.

Offline edward

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Re: Alfred Schnittke (1934-1998)
« Reply #1172 on: August 01, 2020, 11:18:50 AM »
Yes, the first five symphonies are in a very different sound world then the late symphonies.  I think Schnittke might have had one of his bad strokes and been half paralyzed around this time so composing became considerably more difficult and that might explain the shift too.
If I remember the chronology correctly: the first four symphonies came before his first stroke, the 5th came between the first and second strokes; the 6th-8th came between the second and third strokes and the 9th was after the 3rd stroke.

Obviously the glaring stylistic change did come between the 5th and 6th symphonies, but I think there's a subtler stylistic change also present in the music that came after the first stroke.
"I don't at all mind actively disliking a piece of contemporary music, but in order to feel happy about it I must consciously understand why I dislike it. Otherwise it remains in my mind as unfinished business."
 -- Aaron Copland, The Pleasures of Music

Offline CRCulver

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Re: Alfred Schnittke (1934-1998)
« Reply #1173 on: August 01, 2020, 11:37:20 AM »
The first stroke didn't immediately drive Schnittke into his bleak late soundworld. That is, remember that the moving fourth movement of the Cello Concerto No. 1 was written after the first stroke.

Offline edward

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Re: Alfred Schnittke (1934-1998)
« Reply #1174 on: August 01, 2020, 12:13:25 PM »
The first stroke didn't immediately drive Schnittke into his bleak late soundworld. That is, remember that the moving fourth movement of the Cello Concerto No. 1 was written after the first stroke.
Absolutely, and I think Peer Gynt also straddles the period around his first stroke, with the extraordinary Epilogue also coming after it.

However, though I can't quite figure it out, I think there's a subtle change in the music that was begun after his first stroke. Works like the second cello concerto, Monologue, the fourth string quartet and the first piano sonata feel to me more constrained than those of the years leading up to his first stroke.
"I don't at all mind actively disliking a piece of contemporary music, but in order to feel happy about it I must consciously understand why I dislike it. Otherwise it remains in my mind as unfinished business."
 -- Aaron Copland, The Pleasures of Music