Author Topic: Early English Instrumental Music  (Read 47172 times)

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Offline Mandryka

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Re: Early English Instrumental Music
« Reply #200 on: August 24, 2019, 01:03:12 AM »
Woolley, do you mean this one?

Yes, that’s the one. Some good singing in it too, and some nice organ music when you’re in the right frame of mind for it. The instrument is characterful.

By the way, I’m going to send you the Jaud Erbach later this weekend, it’s good!
« Last Edit: August 24, 2019, 01:07:33 AM by Mandryka »
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Offline vers la flamme

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Re: Early English Instrumental Music
« Reply #201 on: August 24, 2019, 02:16:46 AM »
I think you will like this one:

Music of Byrd, Bull and of course Gibbons.
Played on 6 different harpsichords and virginals, 3 of them originals. Played in the sort of harpsichord style in vogue nowadays that lovers will call dreamy and poetic, and haters limp-wristed. I like it!
This looks good, promising selection. But where can it be found? I see it's available as a download on Amazon, but I'd prefer a CD if possible.

Offline bioluminescentsquid

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Re: Early English Instrumental Music
« Reply #202 on: August 24, 2019, 01:17:26 PM »
This looks good, promising selection. But where can it be found? I see it's available as a download on Amazon, but I'd prefer a CD if possible.

It's online (If youtube allows you to see it in your region) here:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DNGTlT5Ndi8&list=PLSZX05Flsi-sNtRjo_icCdWBEDBiR6-X_
Probably on Spotify too, just to try it out.

Of course, CD has better quality. Edit: CD is out of print everywhere! But there are hi-res downloads.
https://www.carpediem-records.de/en/parthenia

Not Early English music, but also check out her Il Cembalo di Partenope disc if you like her style.
« Last Edit: August 24, 2019, 01:22:01 PM by bioluminescentsquid »

Offline bioluminescentsquid

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Re: Early English Instrumental Music
« Reply #203 on: August 24, 2019, 01:18:07 PM »
Yes, that’s the one. Some good singing in it too, and some nice organ music when you’re in the right frame of mind for it. The instrument is characterful.

By the way, I’m going to send you the Jaud Erbach later this weekend, it’s good!

Yes please!

Offline Mandryka

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Re: Early English Instrumental Music
« Reply #204 on: August 27, 2019, 11:32:39 AM »
<a href="https://youtube.com/v/CK5gYh7_Jnk" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://youtube.com/v/CK5gYh7_Jnk</a>

There’s something about the modesty of these performances by Roland Götz which makes me think of Chorzempa’s Orgelbüchlein and Leipzig Chorales. I don’t think that the LP has every been commercially transferred.

Götz is someone who almost missed out on the transition from LP to CD because of distribution and marketing I guess, and who looks as though he’s completely missing out on the transition from CD to streaming and download. 
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Offline milk

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Re: Early English Instrumental Music
« Reply #205 on: October 01, 2019, 04:56:12 PM »

Does anyone know this pianist? I just discovered this.
Also: how is Belder in the Fitzwilliam? Fans here?

Offline bioluminescentsquid

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Re: Early English Instrumental Music
« Reply #206 on: October 12, 2019, 04:21:28 PM »
Speaking of more early English organ music, any thoughts on this one? I feel like the organ is great and characterful, but just becomes less interesting when next to a great organ like the Uttum instrument. Playing is good, but so far not much has stood out for me.
I do hear a "family relationship" with Uttum, though - the organ sings too.


I just listened to Tomkins' colossal Offertory on this disc - 17.5 minutes of quiet ecstasy - and completely regret what I said above. The first 1/3 of the piece is played on a single 8' flute, so well voiced and beautiful that I wouldn't mind if the whole piece was played on it.

The same piece at Uttum with Klapprott is more dramatic, the soul-twisting dissonances more obvious (partly because of the pure meantone at Uttum, compared to the modified "Norden" temperament - but that doesn't matter), but Farr is better at carrying the intensity over the marathon of a piece - I guess is this what Mandryka would mean with a "sense of architecture".

In this disc, there's a rendition of the Offertory on harpsichord. I'm not convinced by it.. yet.
« Last Edit: October 12, 2019, 04:31:09 PM by bioluminescentsquid »

Offline Mandryka

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Re: Early English Instrumental Music
« Reply #207 on: October 12, 2019, 09:10:41 PM »
in fact the music seems to me to sound really good on a harpsichord, because of its virtuosity. I haven’t kept Bertrand Cuiller’s booklet, I don’t know whether he discusses this.

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Offline Mandryka

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Re: Early English Instrumental Music
« Reply #208 on: October 12, 2019, 09:29:51 PM »
By the way, one thing you might enjoy is Gerard van Reenen’s meantone harmonium  performance of Tomkins set of variations on Fortune my Foe, on YouTube (I can’t provide a link easily as I’m using my phone.) This is a huge set of variations, a very late piece by Tomkins, a masterpiece!
« Last Edit: October 12, 2019, 09:35:49 PM by Mandryka »
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Offline Mandryka

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Re: Early English Instrumental Music
« Reply #209 on: November 10, 2019, 09:48:54 PM »


A fluid, moving, noble and intense interpretation of Byrd’s fantasie on ut re mi fa sol la, the slowest harpsichord performance on record I know, and I think that Wilson’s gamble there paid off. In particular the tempo lets me appreciate the beauty of the dissonant section in the middle.

Wilson’s approach is more melodic than contrapuntal, that’s to say, he makes the left and right hand music align smoothly, and you don’t sense much by way of tensions and collisions between the voices like for example, Richard Egarr and Eliizabeth Farr on harpsichord on the same piece. I suppose it’s a case of swings and roundabouts. What you gain in melodiousness and sweetness you lose in complexity and tension.
« Last Edit: November 10, 2019, 09:53:55 PM by Mandryka »
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Offline milk

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Re: Early English Instrumental Music
« Reply #210 on: November 15, 2019, 01:41:33 AM »


I'd like to know more about this; I think she's got a pedal harpsichord going and a clavichord too. Here is someone from a different generation but I think the music is magic in her hands and very fresh.

Offline Mandryka

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Re: Early English Instrumental Music
« Reply #211 on: November 15, 2019, 09:46:38 AM »


I'd like to know more about this; I think she's got a pedal harpsichord going and a clavichord too. Here is someone from a different generation but I think the music is magic in her hands and very fresh.

Harpsichord, clavichord and organ. I just listened to A Fancie, MB25, she plays organ.  I didn’t hear anything distinguished and the sound is not great.
« Last Edit: November 15, 2019, 10:34:31 AM by Mandryka »
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Offline Mandryka

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Re: Early English Instrumental Music
« Reply #212 on: November 15, 2019, 10:57:08 PM »


It’s very good to have all these five part fantasias collected together like this, Spirit of Gambo are clearly committed to Jenkins like no other consort. It has only just been released and so I’ve just begun to listen. But my initial reaction is slightly mitigated by a nagging doubt - that their interpretations are too fluid and too lyrical. In short, that the performances are under-articulated. The result may sometimes come close to the thing which must be avoided in polyphonic music like this at all costs - an interwoven hotchpotch.

This seems rather different from what they did on their recording of four part fantasias, and of course the sound is different too, thicker in the five part music of course, but also I’d say less strongly underpinned by the bass viol. This could be partly due to the engineering - there seems to me to be more air between the musicians in the four part recording



Of course the music is different. Four the five part music we read

while for the four part music we read

a comment which is followed up by a tantalising (for me) remark on enharmonics

Anyway it’s probably not right to post these very preliminary reactions because I’m almost bound to change my mind. But I thought I’d state them in case anyone else felt like listening to see if they feel the same way  p

Returning to the five part music I’m very impressed by the depth of feeling and subtlety of the expression of the music, especially away from the start of the CD. This is a recording which is rewarding for me in the sense that it has repayed repeated listening.
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