Author Topic: Nicholas Medtner  (Read 45927 times)

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Offline Lethevich

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Re: Nicholas Medtner
« Reply #60 on: March 20, 2009, 08:38:20 AM »
I find I need to pay attention with Medtner, and that I cannot use him as background music. I really need to listen. Perhaps with time, I'll be able to listen while doing other things - but not yet. I've grown to like some of this disc and am enjoying the process of learning his music. I recently ordered the piano concerti from Berkshire.

Welcome to the cult :) One way to appreciate Medtner's concerti is to listen to them expecting Beethoven rather than Rachmaninoff. I initially understood the lack of sweeping melodies to be a flaw in the music, but later realised that the composer was aiming for something different. Rather than a grand series of tunes, they are more pointalistic and architectural, these small events combining to form a satisfying whole.
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Re: Nicholas Medtner
« Reply #61 on: March 20, 2009, 08:54:07 AM »
Medner's Skaski I find extremely good (although I like some a lot better than others, which is expected from such collections).  A nice combination of melodic invention, rich harmony, and motific development.  However, my subsequent listening to the piano concerti was a big disappointment and the sonata-ballade struck me as a mess.  I am not impressed so far with Medner's work in large-scale forms. 

Offline Ten thumbs

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Re: Nicholas Medtner
« Reply #62 on: March 30, 2009, 02:23:14 PM »
Medner's Skaski I find extremely good (although I like some a lot better than others, which is expected from such collections).  A nice combination of melodic invention, rich harmony, and motific development.  However, my subsequent listening to the piano concerti was a big disappointment and the sonata-ballade struck me as a mess.  I am not impressed so far with Medner's work in large-scale forms. 

I once expressed the same opinion regarding Medtner's larger forms and was advised to think again. I now have quite the opposite opinion. In fact the Sonata-ballade since you mention it is very tautly constructed. The first piano concerto has to be considering that it is a single sonata form movement lasting over thirty minutes.
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Offline springrite

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Re: Nicholas Medtner
« Reply #63 on: June 01, 2009, 04:39:01 AM »
TTT
Do what I must do, and let what must happen happen.

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robnewman

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Re: Nicholas Medtner
« Reply #65 on: June 01, 2009, 04:50:08 AM »
Improvisation No. 1 in B Flat Minor
Op. 31/1
(Hamelin)

http://www.mediafire.com/?gjnmdmykgzm



Offline springrite

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Re: Nicholas Medtner
« Reply #66 on: June 01, 2009, 04:50:49 AM »
Having been familiar with Medtner's piano music (that includes the concerti) and later some of the chamber works, and becoming a huge fan, I have recently listened to some of his songs (romances) and found them to be wonderful as well. I am becoming resentful of the "Rachmaninov without the tunes" description of Medtner that was so fashionable for a long time. (In fact, it was reading that line that made me curious and led to my first Medtner purchase). First of all, there are tunes. Secondly, Rachmaninov without the tunes (or even WITH the tunes) could not touch Medtner with a ten foot pole!
Do what I must do, and let what must happen happen.

Offline Lethevich

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Re: Nicholas Medtner
« Reply #67 on: June 01, 2009, 04:51:54 AM »
Something I find remarkable is the (not expert, but very fine) orchestral writing in his piano concertos, considering that the composer produced no other mature orchestral work.
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Re: Nicholas Medtner
« Reply #68 on: June 01, 2009, 04:57:22 AM »

I really love this man's music. To me, having listened to much of his music (and some of his sonatas many times) his ideas are often amazing. So dense in ideas. Almost Bach-like. There are a few sonatas of his which I rate as the very greatest of all.


Offline springrite

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Re: Nicholas Medtner
« Reply #69 on: June 01, 2009, 05:03:37 AM »
I really love this man's music. To me, having listened to much of his music (and some of his sonatas many times) his ideas are often amazing. So dense in ideas. Almost Bach-like. There are a few sonatas of his which I rate as the very greatest of all.


Very true. I am planning to name every room in my house after a pianist-composer (if you accept Bach on the piano, that is). I have settled on Bach, Beethoven, Chopin, Liszt, Schumann, Medtner and Alkan.

I will not disclose who has the bathroom or the kitchen, but we can surely rule out Alkan for the bedroom, or the study which contain too many tall bookshelves for comfort!
Do what I must do, and let what must happen happen.

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Re: Nicholas Medtner
« Reply #70 on: June 01, 2009, 05:04:28 AM »
I'm listening to his music RIGHT NOW!

Offline Lethevich

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Re: Nicholas Medtner
« Reply #71 on: June 01, 2009, 05:14:07 AM »
So dense in ideas. Almost Bach-like.

I agree with this description, as far as it can be applied. He seems anti-Romantic in his frequent aversion to the milking of great material, not to mention this trait enhancing appreciation of the structural qualities as they show through better without long lines of surface melodies drawing all attention. The counterpoint becomes more of a focus and it's just such nourishing music.
Peanut butter, flour and sugar do not make cookies. They make FIRE.

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Re: Nicholas Medtner
« Reply #72 on: June 01, 2009, 05:44:39 AM »
Very true. I am planning to name every room in my house after a pianist-composer (if you accept Bach on the piano, that is). I have settled on Bach, Beethoven, Chopin, Liszt, Schumann, Medtner and Alkan.

I will not disclose who has the bathroom or the kitchen, but we can surely rule out Alkan for the bedroom, or the study which contain too many tall bookshelves for comfort!

Alkan !!! Wow, there's a name !

As far as Bach the pianist is concerned, well, here's something I hope you find interesting. I will put it here since you plan to name a room after him ! A short radio interview with the great American Bach player Rosalyn Tureck on Bach and the piano.


Michael Oliver with
Rosalyn Tureck (Pianist and Harpsichordist)
'Bach and the Piano' (1998)


http://www.mediafire.com/?q4ytjynzznt

//

Regards


« Last Edit: June 01, 2009, 11:11:01 PM by robnewman »

Offline Wanderer

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Re: Nicholas Medtner
« Reply #73 on: August 06, 2009, 04:13:41 AM »
The Alexeev/Demidenko recital of music for 2 pianos by Rachmaninov (Suite No.2, Russian Rhapsody, Symphonic Dances) and Medtner (Russian Round Dance op.58/1 & Knight Errant op.58/2) has been reissued by Hyperion in its budget label, Helios. Indispensable!

Samples, here.


George

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Re: Nicholas Medtner
« Reply #74 on: August 06, 2009, 10:43:46 AM »
The Alexeev/Demidenko recital of music for 2 pianos by Rachmaninov (Suite No.2, Russian Rhapsody, Symphonic Dances) and Medtner (Russian Round Dance op.58/1 & Knight Errant op.58/2) has been reissued by Hyperion in its budget label, Helios. Indispensable!

Samples, here.



Very good news! I have no excuse to not pick it up now. Thanks for the heads up. :)

Offline Wanderer

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RIP Geoffrey Tozer
« Reply #75 on: August 29, 2009, 07:31:46 AM »
I've just found out that renowned pianist and celebrated Medtner interpreter Geoffrey Tozer passed away a few days ago, August 20, in Melbourne, aged 54. It was only today that I mentioned his exceptional rendition of Medtner's op.30 piano sonata in another thread. May he rest in peace.  :'(

Farewell to musical prodigy Geoffrey Tozer

Prodigy born to play all masters

Online SonicMan46

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Re: RIP Geoffrey Tozer
« Reply #76 on: August 29, 2009, 08:20:24 AM »
I've just found out that renowned pianist and celebrated Medtner interpreter Geoffrey Tozer passed away a few days ago, August 20, in Melbourne, aged 54. It was only today that I mentioned his exceptional rendition of Medtner's op.30 piano sonata in another thread. May he rest in peace.  :'(

Tasos - thanks for the links in your post above - still own the same Medtner CDs as posted earlier, including the Piano Sonatas w/ Geoffrey Tozer - sad news, indeed!  :-\  Dave

Offline J.Z. Herrenberg

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Re: RIP Geoffrey Tozer
« Reply #77 on: August 30, 2009, 09:06:52 PM »
I've just found out that renowned pianist and celebrated Medtner interpreter Geoffrey Tozer passed away a few days ago, August 20, in Melbourne, aged 54. It was only today that I mentioned his exceptional rendition of Medtner's op.30 piano sonata in another thread. May he rest in peace.  :'(

That's too bad. And still so young. I'll be listening to that op.30 sonata later today.
Music gives a soul to the universe, wings to the mind, flight to the imagination and life to everything. -- Plato

Offline Wanderer

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Re: Nicholas Medtner
« Reply #78 on: November 30, 2009, 12:04:23 PM »


Sudbin is continuing his Medtner piano concerto cycle with the extrovert (and most akin to its dedicatee, Rachmaninov) Second Concerto op.50, deservedly coupled with Rachmaninov’s Fourth (dedicated to Medtner in return). These two works were written during the same period and the two composers corresponded a lot during that time, each eventually inserting elements of its dedicatee into the fabric of their respective work; Medtner emulating the sweeping elan of Rachmaninov without for a moment forsaking his penchant for exhaustive motivic and rhythmic development and Rachmaninov incorporating whimsical rhythmic patterns and idiosyncrasies of typical Medtnerian fashion. A number of these were subsequently ironed out during his extensive revisions of the work, but they're amply demonstrated here in the concerto's original version, an impressive edifice of Rachmaninov’s disillusionment in view of  the modern world, a creation which the public of the day - obviously anticipating another Rach3 - could not and would not comprehend.

Sudbin’s rendition of Medtner’s Second is excellent, full of verve and passion and revealing a great number of personal interpretative views; however, he does not surpass Demidenko who manages to make the work sound even more urgent, ebullient and exciting. He manages to be more clear in the last movement, though, aided by the exquisite support of the orchestra, which plays magnificently throughout in both works.

Rachmaninov’s Fourth in its original version runs equally well, with ample amounts of passion and many opportunities for Sudbin to commit acts of impressive (but never vapid) virtuosity. He compares very favourably to Ghindin’s rendition of the original version of Rach4 (Michelangeli in the revised version being of course quite in another league).

Despite the general excellence of these performances, nevertheless,  I got a strange feeling that there was something missing; perhaps an additional number of rehearsals might allow soloist and orchestra to integrate and communicate more eloquently still. Mostly, I felt a general hesitation from Sudbin’s part, as if he was holding back for some reason. Despite this minor feeling of might-have-been (inspired in part by Demidenko’s stellar rendition of Medtner’s Second), this is an important release, warmly recommended.

Offline Wanderer

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Re: Nicholas Medtner
« Reply #79 on: January 08, 2010, 06:40:31 AM »


A MusicWeb review.