Author Topic: Golijov's Gatehouse  (Read 12176 times)

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Offline Catison

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Re: Golijov's Gatehouse
« Reply #20 on: September 19, 2007, 07:33:00 PM »
So why does that count against him? Shouldn't there be more, not less, publicity for modern composers?

It doesn't necessarily count against him, but lets face it: historically speaking, more advertised has never meant better.  A lot of people become skeptical after a while.  But I am all for a modern composer getting more notice.  I just hope many people can get past his pretty melodies or whatever it is that makes Golijov popular (I haven't heard his music).

I just put a CD of his in my Amazon wishlist, so I'll get a taste soon enough.
-Brett

greg

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Re: Golijov's Gatehouse
« Reply #21 on: September 20, 2007, 05:40:13 AM »
So why does that count against him? Shouldn't there be more, not less, publicity for modern composers?
that's what makes me happy about the advertising, though  ;D
he's modern, and promoted  :o
i just wish they'd advertise other modern composers, too (besides Glass and Adams)

Offline andy

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Re: Golijov's Gatehouse
« Reply #22 on: September 20, 2007, 11:27:43 AM »
I attended a performance of Ainadamar in Boulder, Colorado. As usual when at classical music concerts, I was among the youngest, oh say, 10% of the audience. I'm 24, and most in attendance had gray hair.

Anyhow, I think the audience really enjoyed the piece. I'm sure most of them had never heard it before, but it certainly makes for a good performance. I don't think Ainadamar will be remembered for too long, but I think it's representative of something that's necessary in our culture; that is, it gives intelligent music pop appeal. Not to mention, it has a good, easily  digested story.

I hope that only 1 in 20 of Golijov's work is as poppy as Ainadamar, but that 5% is good to have if you want new fans. Obnoxious as it may be, a little marketing will help your average composer and may even help classic music as a whole.

btpaul674

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Re: Golijov's Gatehouse
« Reply #23 on: September 20, 2007, 01:00:19 PM »
I'll get to meet Golijov in February when he comes to OSU for the Contemporary Music Festival. I'll let you guys know what unfolds.

Mark G. Simon

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Re: Golijov's Gatehouse
« Reply #24 on: September 21, 2007, 10:35:04 AM »
It doesn't necessarily count against him, but lets face it: historically speaking, more advertised has never meant better.

No, that's stating it exactly backwards. Historically, inferior music has been advertised more (as in Britney Spears inferior). There is a difference.

Whatever his shortcomings may be, Golijov is a real composer and it cheers me that it has met there is a composer whose work has attracted enough attention to make such advertisements worthwhile.

Offline knight66

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Re: Golijov's Gatehouse
« Reply #25 on: September 21, 2007, 10:04:45 PM »
Ainadamar makes a superb opera of the mind. The DGG recording is skilfully done and the piece has plenty of memorable things about it. Apart from some catchy tunes, there are a couple of places where the music melts into timelessness. He used percussive sounds very cleverly. I have not seen it and would have thought it might be difficult to stage. It is a short piece, but feels very substantial.

Mike
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I wasted time: and time wasted me.

btpaul674

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Re: Golijov's Gatehouse
« Reply #26 on: January 25, 2008, 08:18:35 AM »
If you could ask Golijov one question, what would it be?

Offline andy

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Re: Golijov's Gatehouse
« Reply #27 on: January 25, 2008, 11:51:15 AM »
If you could ask Golijov one question, what would it be?

Hmmm... I would have to say something about the balance he tries to strike in his music between popular appeal and musical theory. Many of his compositions are quite appealing, even catchy. Does he worry that this will hurt his classical cred?

Or maybe on his synthesis of latin music with the European tradition...

ChamberNut

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Re: Golijov's Gatehouse
« Reply #28 on: January 25, 2008, 12:11:23 PM »
If you could ask Golijov one question, what would it be?

When are you going to be working on your next string quartet? Really love Tenebrae!   :)

btpaul674

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Re: Golijov's Gatehouse
« Reply #29 on: January 25, 2008, 02:58:44 PM »
Thanks for your replies. The situation is Golijov is coming to OSU and I in a 4 person forum that asks Golijov questions in front of the school of music.

I've decided to ask him about his relationship with Dawn Upshaw; how it is working with her and what qualities about her inspire his music he has written for her. This is relevent since Upshaw is coming to OSU as well.

Offline andy

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Re: Golijov's Gatehouse
« Reply #30 on: January 25, 2008, 10:08:12 PM »
Thanks for your replies. The situation is Golijov is coming to OSU and I in a 4 person forum that asks Golijov questions in front of the school of music.

I've decided to ask him about his relationship with Dawn Upshaw; how it is working with her and what qualities about her inspire his music he has written for her. This is relevent since Upshaw is coming to OSU as well.

I think is definitely a good topic to ask him about. I really like Ayre, and I especially love the things Upshaw does with her voice in it. I read a review once where the guy bashed Ayre because Dawn Upshaw has such a beautiful voice, but she does ugly things with it in Ayre. Talk about not getting it!

Anyhow, sounds like a great topic, and I hope you post here to tell us about his visit!

btpaul674

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Re: Golijov's Gatehouse
« Reply #31 on: January 25, 2008, 11:03:09 PM »
After reading my prior post, I realize the wording I chose is incoherent and in some places erroneous. I was distracted... sorry.

Apparently other questions that are to ensue cover his background with Klezmer and Tango Nuevo as well as working with diverse musicians such as Zakir Hussain, Yo-Yo Ma, and The Kronos Quartet.



Columbus Symphony Orchestra is performing Three Songs for Soprano and Orchestra and Last Round on Feb. 1st with guest conductor Scott Yoo.

M forever

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Re: Golijov's Gatehouse
« Reply #32 on: January 26, 2008, 01:23:09 AM »
I heard "Azul" and "Ausencia" in December in Boston with Yo Yo Ma and the BSO conducted by some dude called Harth-Bedoya who after the intermission acted the maestro while the BSO autopiloted through Dvoř├ík 8.
Ma played very well and very expressively and the music was quite interesting to listen to, but I can't say I really got inside it. This was more or less my first exposure to Golijov's music, so I didn't expect to "get" it. But it sounded interesting enough to return to it sometime. My first impression was of a lot of ideas, but really no structure, more like a composed improvisation, if you know what I mean. Or maybe I just didn't see the structures.

Offline Guido

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Re: Golijov's Gatehouse
« Reply #33 on: January 26, 2008, 06:06:10 AM »
Thankyou for answering my initial question! I imagine it will be recorded at some point - the most successful recording cellist along with maybe the most successful contemporary composer will surely convince the record companies.
Geologist.

The large print giveth, and the small print taketh away

M forever

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Re: Golijov's Gatehouse
« Reply #34 on: January 26, 2008, 10:21:31 AM »
Well, it's too late for that - Rostropovich passed away last year. I agree, it would have been great if he had recorded Glass' cello concerto. I really like the piece a lot. I played in the US premiere in November.

Offline Guido

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Re: Golijov's Gatehouse
« Reply #35 on: January 26, 2008, 03:35:51 PM »
Oh really? I have to say that its one of my least favourite pieces of Glass... Once of his least interesting pieces, and really quite badly written for the cello (and was even worse before Julian Lloyd Webber intervened - was he the soloist incidentally?). Rostropovich didn't play any concertos that were composed during his adult lifetime that he didn't comission (almost without exception). An odd quirk which meant that he comissioned a second Jolivet concerto instead of playing the first, also true of Schnittke, Penderecki, Hoddinott, Matthews, (a few others that I can't recall) and also he didn't play the Walton and Barber concertos, to note the two most obvious and finest examples of his neglect. (The only exceptions being: Hindemith's concerto of 1940 he played on three occasions, and the Prokofiev concerto he played once before Prokofiev reworked it into the Symphony concerto. He played the Honegger and Milhaud (1st) concertos too but they were composed before he had started the cello)

I was sure that Yo-Yo Ma had sold more CDs than Rostropovich. I can't remember where I had read that.

P.S. Do you play Double Bass? Which orchestra do you play with?
« Last Edit: January 26, 2008, 03:38:48 PM by Guido »
Geologist.

The large print giveth, and the small print taketh away

M forever

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Re: Golijov's Gatehouse
« Reply #36 on: January 27, 2008, 12:28:35 AM »
I used to be co-principal bass with the La Jolla Symphony in San Diego, but since I am moving to Boston next week, I won't be able to play with that orchestra anymore. The soloist was Wendy Sutter. She played the concerto much better than JLW on the recording. Actually, Glass (he attended the final rehearsals and the performances) said he didn't like the way JLW played the piece at all.

Offline Guido

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Re: Golijov's Gatehouse
« Reply #37 on: January 27, 2008, 03:49:03 AM »
Quote
Actually, Glass (he attended the final rehearsals and the performances) said he didn't like the way JLW played the piece at all.

Ooh controversy, - did he say why? I haven't heard of Wendy Sutter - I will look her up. I think the central movement is just too long, and aside from the arresting opening figure, it just meanders too much, but maybe a better performance might make it more convincing.
Geologist.

The large print giveth, and the small print taketh away

Mark G. Simon

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Re: Golijov's Gatehouse
« Reply #38 on: January 27, 2008, 06:39:25 AM »
Hmmm... I would have to say something about the balance he tries to strike in his music between popular appeal and musical theory. Many of his compositions are quite appealing, even catchy. Does he worry that this will hurt his classical cred?


I think it's so sad that composers have to make that kind of a choice. We complain that nobody likes classical music, we complain that nobody into classical music likes new music, and then turn around and complain when a composer comes along and writes something that people like.

ChamberNut

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Re: Golijov's Gatehouse
« Reply #39 on: January 27, 2008, 08:08:39 AM »
I think it's so sad that composers have to make that kind of a choice. We complain that nobody likes classical music, we complain that nobody into classical music likes new music, and then turn around and complain when a composer comes along and writes something that people like.

Very well said!  No matter what, someone will always find something to complain about.