Author Topic: Morton Feldman (1926-1987)  (Read 92518 times)

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Offline Mandryka

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Re: Morton Feldman (1926-1987)
« Reply #740 on: July 24, 2021, 11:55:39 PM »
Does anyone know if Feldman was aware of Radulescu? Or even vice versa.


This may be a crazy line of thinking. But listening to Radukescu’s 4th quartet made me think very much of the harmony and structure of For Samuel Beckett.
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Offline Artem

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Re: Morton Feldman (1926-1987)
« Reply #741 on: July 26, 2021, 12:23:39 PM »
Herbert Henck playing Triadic Memories

https://soundcloud.com/user-985460328/sets/herbert-henck-beginner-studio

Almost like Reinbert de Leeuw playing Satie.

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Morton Feldman (1926-1987)
« Reply #742 on: September 28, 2021, 06:52:56 AM »
I’m listening to the Pellegrini Quartet’s recording of Violin and String Quartet. This piece doesn’t get mentioned much. Do you think this is a successful work?

Yes! I mean it's late period Feldman, so it is on the long-ish side, but I like it better than either of the SQs for example. Piano and String Quartet is also quite good.
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Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Morton Feldman (1926-1987)
« Reply #743 on: September 28, 2021, 06:56:02 AM »
I really liked Marc-Andre Hamelin's interpretation of For Bunita Marcus (I believe the second slowest one I've heard) but frustratingly Hyperion have added some digital processing like ambience or ringing quality to the middle and upper registers of the piano. For me kills a lot of the enjoyment of this, barely listenable on headphones and just acceptable on speakers. I'm not sure why Harmonia Mundi and Hyperion do this to many of their solo piano recordings.

Forget the Hamelin and give this one a listen:

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orchestrion

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Re: Morton Feldman (1926-1987)
« Reply #744 on: September 29, 2021, 02:00:41 PM »
Does anyone know if Feldman was aware of Radulescu? Or even vice versa.
They were certainly aware of one another, having both been on the faculty of the Darmstadt courses in the 1980s. I doubt very much that either's work influenced the other though. Radulescu's 4th Quartet is focused on harmonic spectra whereas Feldman wasn't at all concerned about such things.

Offline Mandryka

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Re: Morton Feldman (1926-1987)
« Reply #745 on: September 30, 2021, 07:27:15 AM »
They were certainly aware of one another, having both been on the faculty of the Darmstadt courses in the 1980s. I doubt very much that either's work influenced the other though. Radulescu's 4th Quartet is focused on harmonic spectra whereas Feldman wasn't at all concerned about such things.

I have absolutely no idea why I said that in June! I may well have been drunk. But seeing it again has prompted me to listen to half of Arditti’s Radulescu 4, which is nice.

There used to be 6 Radulescu quartets on YouTube, 4 seemed to be a breakthrough one, one where he found a really distinctive voice.

By the way, have you heard the new Radigue? Occam 3. I like it a lot.
« Last Edit: September 30, 2021, 07:54:36 AM by Mandryka »
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Offline Mandryka

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Re: Morton Feldman (1926-1987)
« Reply #746 on: September 30, 2021, 09:17:31 AM »
https://taniacarolinechen.bandcamp.com/album/monitored-feldman

Caroline Chen, Thomas Dimuzio and Jon Leidecker used Triadic Memories as the basis for some improvised live electronics. I think it's rather nice.

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/vAkKzBidoHs&amp;ab_channel=TheLabSF" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/vAkKzBidoHs&amp;ab_channel=TheLabSF</a>
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Offline hvbias

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Re: Morton Feldman (1926-1987)
« Reply #747 on: October 03, 2021, 01:56:45 PM »
Forget the Hamelin and give this one a listen:



I heard this after making that post on Hamelin, this performance from Aki Takahashi is excellent but it has even more reverberance than the Hamelin recording so I couldn't tolerate it. My go to is the recording by Philip Thomas on Another Timbre; the performance is exceptional and the recording quality is state of the art. If I recall the label owner is an ex BBC recording engineer which might explain why I've never heard anything poor sounding from them.
« Last Edit: October 03, 2021, 01:59:12 PM by hvbias »

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Morton Feldman (1926-1987)
« Reply #748 on: October 03, 2021, 02:11:07 PM »
I heard this after making that post on Hamelin, this performance from Aki Takahashi is excellent but it has even more reverberance than the Hamelin recording so I couldn't tolerate it. My go to is the recording by Philip Thomas on Another Timbre; the performance is exceptional and the recording quality is state of the art. If I recall the label owner is an ex BBC recording engineer which might explain why I've never heard anything poor sounding from them.

Hmmm...I'm not sure if I'm following you with the state of the art comment in regards to recording quality. Mode Records, in general, have especially high standards in their recording practices and I have to say I never heard a poor sounding recording from their label. I should give a listen to the Philip Thomas performance, though as I don't think I've heard it and I own that box set of Feldman solo piano music.
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Offline hvbias

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Re: Morton Feldman (1926-1987)
« Reply #749 on: October 03, 2021, 02:26:27 PM »
Hmmm...I'm not sure if I'm following you with the state of the art comment in regards to recording quality. Mode Records, in general, have especially high standards in their recording practices and I have to say I never heard a poor sounding recording from their label. I should give a listen to the Philip Thomas performance, though as I don't think I've heard it and I own that box set of Feldman solo piano music.

My comment on state of the art was not meant to put down Mode, but to praise Another Timbre. Mode are excellent too, but with this particular recording the reverberance is too much for me.

Listen to the way the notes trail off on the Takahashi performance, I've never heard a piano sound like that in dozens of different environments that I've heard them. It sounds like they either added it in digitally or if that is natural the room must have really live sounding walls like tons of glass.

(I know this sounds recording snobby, I'm not, with Feldman it draws me in closer to the music when it sounds as realistic as possible. Given disparities in performance I'd certainly choose the one not recorded as well)
« Last Edit: October 03, 2021, 02:28:14 PM by hvbias »

Offline Artem

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Re: Morton Feldman (1926-1987)
« Reply #750 on: October 04, 2021, 01:54:43 AM »
Vey interesting exchange on these recent For Bunita Marcus recordings. Makes me want to hear them both now. I only heard a few, but my favourite is Hildegard Kleeb on HatArt.

Another Timbre is a great label. My exposure to their Feldman catalogue is limited, but I found their performance kind of formalistic, not particularly surprising.

Offline Mandryka

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Re: Morton Feldman (1926-1987)
« Reply #751 on: October 04, 2021, 07:33:41 AM »
Vey interesting exchange on these recent For Bunita Marcus recordings. Makes me want to hear them both now. I only heard a few, but my favourite is Hildegard Kleeb on HatArt.

Another Timbre is a great label. My exposure to their Feldman catalogue is limited, but I found their performance kind of formalistic, not particularly surprising.

 I like Kleeb very much.
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Offline Mandryka

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Re: Morton Feldman (1926-1987)
« Reply #752 on: October 04, 2021, 07:35:06 AM »

My go to is the recording by Philip Thomas on Another Timbre; the performance is exceptional and the recording quality is state of the art.

The decay of the piano is indeed impressively captured and it contributes a lot to the interest of the interpretation.
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